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Then the Saviour bent down, and the Saviour No sound ought to be heard in the church In silence wrote on in the sand. but the healing voice of Christian charity.

JOAQUIN MILLER-Charity. BURKE-Reflections on the Revolution in France. (1790)

Charité bien ordonné commence par soy même.

Charity well directed should begin at home. Though I speak with the tongues of men and MONTLUCLa Comédie de Proverbes. Act III. of angels, and have not charity, I am become as Sc. 7. (See also BEAUMONT) sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal. I Corinthians. XIII. 1.

Charity shall cover the multitude of sins. 3

I Peter. IV. 8. Though I have all faith, so that I could remove

16 mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing. In Faith and Hope the world will disagree, I Corinthians. XIII. 2.

But all mankind's concern is charity.

POPE-Essay on Man. Ep. III. L. 307. Charity suffereth long and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not

Soft peace she brings, wherever she arrives: puffed up.

She builds our quiet, as she forms our lives: I Corinthians. XIII. 4.

Lays the rough paths of peevish Nature even, 5

And opens in each heart a little Heaven. And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these

PRIOR-Charity.
three; but the greatest of these is charity.
I Corinthians. XIII. 13.

Charity itself fulfills the law,
And who can sever love from charity?

Love's Labour's Lost. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 364.
True Charity, a plant divinely nurs’d.
COWPER Charity. L. 573.

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Charity,

Which renders good for bad, blessings for curses. No farther seek his merits to disclose,

Richard III. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 68. Or draw his frailties from their dread abode (There they alike in trembling hope repose), I believe there is no sentiment he has such faith The bosom of his Father and his God.

in as that "charity begins at home" GRAY-Elegy in a Country Churchyard. And his, I presume, is of that domestic sort Epitaph.

which never stirs abroad at all.

SHERIDAN-School for Scandal. Act. V. Sc. 1. When your courtyard twists, do not pour the

(See also BEAUMONT) water abroad.

21 GREFS.

Our charity begins at home, (See also BEAUMONT)

And mostly ends where it begins.

HORACE SMITH-Horace in London. Bk. II. Meek and lowly, pure and holy,

Ode 15. Chief among the blessed three.”

(See also BEAUMONT) CHARLES JEFFERYS—Charity.

Cold is thy hopeless heart, even as charity. 10 In silence,

SOUTHEY—Soldier's Wife.
Steals on soft-handed Charity,
Tempering her gifts, that seem so free,

Proximus sum egomet mihi.
By time and place,

Charity begins at home. (Free trans.)
Till not a woe the bleak world see,

TERENCE-Andria. Act IV. Sc. 1. 12. Greek But finds her grace.

from MENANDER. See note to Andria. Act KEBLE—The Christian Year. The Sunday II. Sc. 5. 16. (Valpy's ed.) After Ascension Day. St. 6.

(See also BEAUMONT) 11 He is truly great who hath a great charity.

Let them learn first to show piety at home. THOMAS A KEMPIS-Imitation of Christ. Bk.

I Timothy. V. 4. I. Ch. III. DIBDIN's trans.

(See also BEAUMONT) 12

In necessasariis, unitas; In dubiis, libertas; in omnibus, caritas.

CHASE, THE In things essential, unity; in doubtful, He thought at heart like courtly Chesterfield, liberty; in all things, charity.

Who, after a long chase o'er hills, dales, bushes, RUPERTUS MELDENIUS. So attributed by And what not, though he rode beyond all price,

CANON FARRAR at Croyden Church Con Ask'd next day, "if men ever hunted twice?" gress, 1877. Also attributed to Melancthon. BYRON—Don Juan. Canto XIV. St. 35. Quoted as "A gude saying o' auld Mr. Guthrie” in A Crack aboot the Kirk, ap- They sought it with thimbles, they sought it pended to Memoirs of Norman Maclood,

with care; D.D. Vol. I. P. 340.

They pursued it with forks and hope; 13

They threatened its life with a railway-share; All crush'd and stone-cast in behaviour,

They charmed it with smiles and soap. She stood as a marble would stand,

LEWIS CARROLL-Hunting of the Snark. Fit 5.

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But who, if he be called upon to face
Some awful moment to which Heaven has

joined
Great issues, good or bad for humankind,
Is happy as a lover.
WORDSWORTH-Character of a Happy Warrior.

L. 48.

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Whom neither shape of danger can dismay,
Nor thought of tender happiness betray.
WORDSWORTH-Character of a Happy Warrior.

L. 72.

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Nor e'er was to the bowers of bliss conveyed
A fairer spirit, or more welcome shade.

TICKELLOn the Death of Mr. Addison. L. 45. Quantum instar in ipso est.

None but himself can be his parallel.
VERGIL-Æneid. VI. L. 865. He (Cæsar)

was equal only to himself. SIR WILLIAM
TEMPLE. As quoted by GRANGER-Bio-
graphical History. Found in DoDD-Epi-
grammatists.

(See also THEOBALD) Uni odiisque viro telisque frequentibus instant. Ille velut rupes vastum quæ prodit in æquor, Obvia ventorum furiis, expostaque ponto, Vim cunctam atque minas perfert coelique ma

risque, Ipsa immota manens.

They attack this one man with their hate and their shower of weapons. But he is like some rock which stretches into the vast sea and which, exposed to the fury of the winds and beaten against by the waves, endures all the violence and threats of heaven and sea, himself standing unmoved. VERGIL-Æneid. X. 692.

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In charity to all mankind, bearing no malice or ill-will to any human being, and even compassionating those who hold in bondage their fellow-men, not knowing what they do. JOHN QUINCY ADAMSLetter to A. Bronson. July 30, 1838.

(See also LINCOLN under Right) Charity is a virtue of the heart, and not of the hands.

ADDISONThe Guardian. No. 166.

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Accipe nunc Danaum insidias, et crimine ab uno Disce omnes.

Learn now of the treachery of the Greeks, and from one example the character of the nation may be known. VERGIL-Æneid. II. 65. Il [le Chevalier de Belle

Isle) était capable de tout imaginer, de tout arranger, et de tout faire.

He (the Chevalier de Belle-Isle) was capable
of imagining all, of arranging all, and of doing
everything
VOLTAIRE-Siècle de Louis XV. Works. XXI.
P. 67.

(See also CLARENDON)
Lord of the golden tongue and smiting eyes;
Great out of season and untimely wise:
A man whose virtue, genius, grandeur, worth,
Wrought deadlier ill than ages can undo.

WM. WATSONThe Political Luminary.
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good as be

longs to you. WALT WHITMAN–Song of Myself. I.

Formed on the good old plan, A true and brave and downright honest man! He blew no trumpet in the market-place, Nor in the church with hypocritic face Supplied with cant the lack of Christian grace;

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Then the Saviour bent down, and the Saviour No sound ought to be heard in the church In silence wrote on in the sand. but the healing voice of Christian charity.

JOAQUIN MILLER—Charity. BURKE-Reflections on the Revolution in France. (1790)

Charité bien ordonné commence par soy même.

Charity well directed should begin at home. Though I speak with the tongues of men and MONTLUC—La Comédie de Proverbes. Act III. of angels, and have not charity, I am become as Sc. 7. (See also BEAUMONT) sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal. I Corinthians. XIII. 1.

Charity shall cover the multitude of sins. 3

I Peter. IV. 8. Though I have all faith, so that I could remove

16 mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.

In Faith and Hope the world will disagree, I Corinthians. XIII. 2.

But all mankind's concern is charity.

POPE-Essay on Man. Ep. III. L. 307. Charity suffereth long and is kind; charity

17 envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not

Soft

peace she brings, wherever she arrives: puffed up.

She builds our quiet, as she forms our lives: I Corinthians. XIII. 4.

Lays the rough paths of peevish Nature even, 5

And opens in each heart a little Heaven. And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these

PRIOR-Charity. three; but the greatest of these is charity. I Corinthians. XIII. 13.

Charity itself fulfills the law,

And who can sever love from charity? 6

Love's Labour's Lost. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 364. True Charity, a plant divinely nurs'd. COWPER Charity. L. 573.

Charity,

Which renders good for bad, blessings for curses. No farther seek his merits to disclose,

Richard III. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 68. Or draw his frailties from their dread abode (There they alike in trembling hope repose), I believe there is no sentiment he has such faith The bosom of his Father and his God.

in as that "charity begins at home" GRAY-Elegy in a Country Churchyard.

And his, I presume, is of that domestic sort Epitaph.

which never stirs abroad at all. 8

SHERIDAN-School for Scandal. Act. V. Sc. 1. When your courtyard twists, do not pour the

(See also BEAUMONT) water abroad. GREFS.

Our charity begins at home, (See also BEAUMONT)

And mostly ends where it begins.

HORACE SMITH-Horace in London. Bk. II. Meek and lowly, pure and holy,

Ode 15. Chief among the blessed three.”

(See also BEAUMONT) CHARLES JEFFERYS—Charity.

Cold is thy hopeless heart, even as charity. 10 In silence,

SOUTHEYSoldier's Wife.
Steals on soft-handed Charity,
Tempering her gifts, that seem so free,

Proximus sum egomet mihi.
By time and place,

Charity begins at home. (Free trans.)
Till not a woe the bleak world see,

TERENCE-Andria. Act IV. Sc. 1. 12. Greek But finds her grace.

from MENANDER. See note to Andria. Act KEBLE—The Christian Year. The Sunday II. Sc. 5. 16. (Valpy's ed.) After Ascension Day. St. 6.

(See also BEAUMONT) 11 He is truly great who hath a great charity.

Let them learn first to show piety at home. THOMAS & KEMPISImitation of Christ. Bk.

I Timothy. V. 4. I. Ch. III. DIBDIN's trans.

(See also BEAUMONT) In necessasariis, unitas; In dubiis, libertas; in omnibus, caritas.

CHASE, THE In things essential, unity; in doubtful, He thought at heart like courtly Chesterfield, liberty; in all things, charity.

Who, after a long chase o'er hills, dales, bushes, RUPERTUS MELDENIUS. So attributed by And what not, though he rode beyond all price,

CANON FARRAR at Croyden Church Con Ask'd next day, "if men ever hunted twice?gress, 1877. Also attributed to Melancthon. BYRONDon Juan. Canto XIV. St. 35. Quoted as “A gude saying o' auld Mr. Guthrie" in A Crack aboot the Kirk, ap They sought it with thimbles, they sought it pended to Memoirs of Norman Maclood, D.D. Vol. I. P. 340.

They pursued it with forks and hope; 13

They threatened its life with a railway-share; All crush'd and stone cast in behaviour,

They charmed it with smiles and soap. She stood as a marble would stand,

LEWIS CARROLL-Hunting of the Snark. Fit 5,

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with care;

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The dusky night rides down the sky

CHASTITY (See also PURITY) And ushers in the morn:

There's a woman like a dew-drop, The hounds all join in glorious cry,

She's so purer than the purest. The huntsman winds his horn;

ROBERT BROWNING—A Blot in the 'Scutcheon. And a-hunting we will go.

Act I. Sc. 3. HENRY FIELDING--Anda-Hunting We Will Go. 13 2

That chastity of honour which felt a stain like The woods were made for the hunter of dreams, a wound. The brooks for the fishers of song;

BURKE-Reflections on the Revolution in France. To the hunters who hunt for the gunless game The streams and the woods belong.

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As pure as a pearl, There are thoughts that moan from the soul of And as perfect: a noble and innocent girl. pine

OWEN MEREDITH (Lord Lytton)-Lucile. Pt. And thoughts in a flower bell curled;

II. Canto VI. St. 16. And the thoughts that are blown with scent of

15 the fern

"Tis chastity, my brother, chastity; Are as new and as old as the world.

She that has that is clad in complete steel,
Sam WALTER Foss-Bloodless Sportsman.

And, like a quiver'd nymph with arrows keen,
May trace huge forests, and unharbour'd heaths,

Infamous hills, and sandy perilous wilds;
Soon as Aurora drives away the night,
And edges eastern clouds with rosy light,

Where, through the sacred rays of chastity,
The healthy huntsman, with the cheerful horn, Will dare to soil'her virgin purity.

No savage fierce, bandite, or mountaineer,
Summons the dogs, and greets the dappled morn.
Gay-Rural Sports. Canto II. L. 93.

MILTONComus. L. 420.

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So dear to Heaven is saintly chastity, Love's torments made me seek the chase; That, when a soul is found sincerely so, Rifle in hand, I roam'd apace.

A thousand liveried angels lacky her, Down from the tree, with hollow scoff,

Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt. The raven cried: "Head-off! head off!"

MILTON-Comus. L. 453. HEINE-Book of Songs. Youthful Sorrows.

17 No. 8.

Like the stain'd web that whitens in the sun, 5 Of horn and morn, and hark and bark,

Grow pure by being purely shone upon. And echo's answering sounds,

MOORE-Lalla Rookh. The Veiled Prophet of

Khorassan. All poets' wit hath ever writ

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In dog-rel verse of hounds.
HOOD-Epping Hunt. St. 10.

If she seem not chaste to me,
What care I how chaste she be?

SIR WALTER RALEIGH. Written the night beD'ye ken John Peel with his coat so gay?

fore his death. D'ye ken John Peel at the break of the day?

19 D'ye ken John Peel when he's far, far away, My chastity's the jewel of our house, With his hounds and his horn in the morning? Bequeathed down from many ancestors. John Peel. Old Hunting Song. ("Coat so All's Well That Ends Well. Act IV. Sc. 2. L.46. gray,” said to be in the original)

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The very ice of chastity is in them.
It (hunting) was the labour of the savages of
North America, but the amusement of the

As You Like It. Act III. Sc. 4. L. 18. gentlemen of England.

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Chaste as the icicle SAMUEL JOHNSON-Johnsoniana.

That's curded by the frost from purest snow

And hangs on Dian's temple. With a hey, ho, chevy!

Coriolanus. Act V. Sc. 3. L. 66. Hark forward, hark forward, tantivy!

22 Hark, hark, tantivy!

As chaste as unsunn'd snow.
This day a stag must die.

Cymbeline. Act. II. Sc. 5. L. 14.
JOHN O'KEEFE—Song in Czar Peter. Act I.
Sc. 4.

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A nice man is a man of nasty ideas. Together let us beat this ample field,

SWIFT- Preface to one of BISHOP BURNET'S Try what the open, what the covert yield.

Introductions to History of the Reformation. POPEEssay on Man. Ep. I. L. 9

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Neque femina amissa pudicitia alia abnuerit. 10 Proud Nimrod first the bloody chase began,

When a woman has lost her chastity, she

will shrink from no crime. A mighty hunter, and his prey was man.

TACITUS---Annales. IV. 3. POPE-Windsor Forest. L. 61.

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Then she rode forth, clothed on with chastity: My hoarse-sounding horn

The deep air listen'd round her as she rode, Invites thee to the chase, the sport of kings. And all the low wind hardly breathed for fear. WILLIAM SOMERVILLE--The Chase.

TENNYSON--Godiva. L. 53.

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Even from the body's purity, the mind Receives a secret sympathetic aid. THOMSON-Seasons Summer. L. 1,269.

CHATTAHOOCHEE (RIVER)

CHERRY TREE

Cerasus Sweet is the air with the budding haws, and the

valley stretching for miles below Is white with blossoming cherry-trees, as if just

covered with lightest snow. LONGFELLOW-Christus. Golden Legend. Pt. IV.

CHESTNUT TREE

Castanea Vesca

When I see the chestnut letting All her lovely blossoms falter down, I think,

“Alas the day!” JEAN INGELOW-The Warbling of Blackbirds. The chestnuts, lavish of their long-hid gold, To the faint Summer, beggared now and old, Pour back the sunshine hoarded 'neath her fa

voring eye. LOWELLIndian-Summer Reverie. St. 10.

Out of the hills of Habersham,

Down the valleys of Hall,
I hurry amain to reach the plain;

Run the rapid and leap the fall,
Split at the rock, and together again
Accept my bed, or narrow or wide,

And flee from folly on every side With a lover's pain to attain the plain,

Far from the hills of Habersham,

Far from the valleys of Hall. SIDNEY LANIERThe Song of the Chattahoochee.

CHEERFULNESS

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Cheered up himself with ends of verse
And sayings of philosophers.

BCTLER-Hudibras. Pt.I. Canto III. L.1,011.

CHILDHOOD (See also BABYHOOD) The children in Holland take pleasure in making What the children in England take pleasure in

breaking Old Nursery Rhyme.

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A cheerful look makes a dish a feast.

HERBERT, Jacula Prudentum.

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My lovely living Boy, My hope, my hap, my Love, my life, my joy. DU BARTAS-Divine Weekes and Workes. Second Week, Fourth Day. Bk. II.

"Tis not a life, 'Tis but a piece of childhood thrown away. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER-Philaster. Act

V. Sc. 2. L. 15. 21 Do ye

hear the children weeping, O my brothers, Ere the sorrow comes with years? They are leaning their young heads against their

mothers, And that cannot stop their tears. E. B. BROWNINGThe Cry of the Children.

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Cheer up, the worst is yet to come.
PHILANDER JOHNSON. See Everybody's Mag-

azine, May, 1920. P. 36. See TENNYSON-
Sea Dreams, L. 5 from end.

It is good To lengthen to the last a sunny mood.

LOWELL-Legend of Brittany. Pt. I. St. 35. Leve fit quod bene fertur onus.

That load becomes light which is cheerfully borne. OVID-Amorum. 1. 2. 10.

Had she been light, like you, Of such a merry, nimble, stirring spirit, She might ha' been a grandam ere she died; And so may you; for a light heart lives long. Love's Labour's Lost. Act V. Sc. 2. L. 15.

Look cheerfully upon me. Here, love; thou seest how dilgent I am.

Taming of the Shrew. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 38. He makes a July's day short as December, And with his varying childness cures in me Thoughts that would thick my blood.

Winter's Tale. Act I, Sc. 2. L. 169.

Women know The way to rear up children (to be just); They know a simple, merry, tender knack Of tying sashes, fitting baby-shoes, And stringing pretty words that make no sense, And kissing full sense into empty words; Which things are corals to cut life upon, Although such trifles. E. B. BROWNING—Aurora Leigh. Bk. I. L.

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