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He that parts 469 sis kunigaie water sweethalal saldo Ile that commends me to mine own content And hire 1x kok you

Commends me to the thing I cannot get. in Ng

Comedy of Errors. Act I, Sc. 2. L. 33. !!, will

For mine own part, I could be well content digi DU EUIL bissy 13,

To entertain the lag-end of my life Meri Wr."

With quiet hours. Une 23 als en matiba

Henry IV. Pt. I. Act V. Sc. 1. L. 23. To on hiukan it!! duru si

iwage of mind,

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The shepherd's homely curds,

Hlis cold thin drink out of his leathern bottle, Gruntis

ljetoni His wonted sleep under a fresh tree's shade,

All which secure and sweetly he enjoys, In the 51

;** joy. Vluch Is far beyond a prince's delicates,

"F", the contented ! His viands sparkling in a golden cup, For si

Lips, even His body couched in a curious bed, Lisiais

| When care, mistrust, and treason wait on him. Sarel ijr

In China Repos

Henry VI. Pt. III. Act II. Sc. 5. L. 47. Tel lassan

16 Żur'"

My crown is in my heart, not on my head;

Not deck'd with diamonds and Indian stones, 1 woulu se bl.

Nor to be seen: my crown is called content; sea, Eki 180

A crown it is that seldom kings enjoy. their un kā?! go well to know

Henry VI. Pt. III. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 63. take a piwn wie weils to do or xay Zenelia vs. 2UL-131% tetest, best. Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile,

Ek. VIII. L. 548. And cry, "Content" to that which grieves my

heart; But COD1 typeh and no tongue to wound us,

And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, Fills himn u bank we all heaven around us!

And frame my face to all occasions. us wait

Henry VI. Pt. III. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 182. Incosial" រឺ uូឬ **

"Tis better to be lowly born, !Irsque inglorius annos L 10

And range with humble livers in content, imge pares.

Than to be perk'd up in a glistering grief, uned, and pass many

And wear a golden sorrow. Througis II and Inkuowa to fame; and also

Henry VIII. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 19. burt In iuge 17 ? Aum. Lil. 4. 43.

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Our content SPENS

Is our best having.
I she as var the sun;

Henry VIII. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 23.
w nest for me!
wret one,

20 hii un'r arii pour green tree!

In measureless content.
Twitter:ut beat like thine and mine

Macbeth. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 17.
Atul lui sunt byla sepas humble earth; -
If a man of our Heaven shall shine

If it were now to die,
SIE *** of onr Hearth!

'Twere now to be most happy; for I fear ! "1- A Song of Content.

My soul hath her content so absolute

That not another comfort like to this r*pequus tibi satis habes, qui bene Succeeds in unknown fate.

Othello. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 191. ili pugunro content, you have enough to live

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'Tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a Aulularia. II. 2. 10.

church door; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve.

Romeo and Juliet. Act IIÍ. Sc. 1. L. 100 #f-diaga 16 nastus: nota mala res optima est.

Not on the outer world
Kpu what you have got; the known evil is

For inward joy depend;
GATTUS---Trinummus. I. 2. 25.

Enjoy the luxury of thought,

Make thine own self friend;

Not with the restless throng, i'er the passion, knowledge, fame, or pelf, In search of solace roam b. * will change his neighbor with himself.

But with an independent zeal Pop-Essay on Man. Ep. II. L. 261.

Be intimate at home.

LYDIA SIGOURNEY--Know Thyself. I warn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man ste, envy no man's happiness; glad of other The noblest mind the best contentment has. ma's good, content with my harm.

SPENSER-Faerie Queene. Bk. I. Canto I. St. As You Like It. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 77.

35.

Shut up

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Some things are of that nature as to make
One's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache.
BUNYAN--The Author's Way of Sending Forth

his Second Part of the Pilgrim. L. 126. Contented wi' little, and cantie wi' mair.

BURNS-Contented wi' Little.

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Happy the man, of mortals happiest he,
Whose quiet mind from vain desires is free;
Whom neither hopes deceive, nor fears torment,
But lives at peace, within himself content;
In thought, or act, accountable to none
But to himself, and to the gods alone.
GEO. GRANVILLE (Lord Lansdowne)-Epistle

to Mrs. Higgons, 1690. L. 79.
Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content;
The quiet mind is richer than a crown;
Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent;
The poor estate scorns fortune's angry frown:
Such sweet content, such minds, such sleep, such

bliss, Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss.

ROBERT GREENE-Song. Farewell to Folly. Let's live with that small pittance which we

have; Who covets more is evermore a slave.

HERRICKThe Covetous Still Captive.

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I would do what I pleased, and doing what I pleased, I should have my will, and having my will, I should be contented; and when one is contented, there is no more to be desired; and when there is no more to be desired, there is an end of it. CERVANTES—Don Quixote. Pt. I. Bk. IV.

Ch. XXIII.

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In a cottage I live, and the cot of content,

Where a few little rooms for ambition too low, Are furnish'd as plain as a patriarch's tent,

With all for convenience, but nothing for show: Like Robinson Crusoe's, both peaceful and pleas

ant, By industry stor’d, like the hive of a bee; And the peer who looks down with contempt on a

peasant. Can ne'er be look'd up to with envy by me. JOHN COLLINSHow to be Happy. in his

Scripscrapologia.

Quanto quisque sibi plura negaverit,
A dis plura feret. Nil cupientium
Nudus castra peto.

The more a man denies himself, the more he shall receive from heaven. Naked, I seek the camp of those who covet nothing. HORACE_Carmina. III. 16. 21.

Multa petentibus Desunt multa; bene est cui deus obtulit Parca quod satis est manu.

Those who want much, are always much in need; happy the man to whom God gives with a sparing hand what is sufficient for his wants. HORACE—Carmina. III, 16. 42.

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We'll therefore relish with content,
Whate'er kind Providence has sent,

Nor aim beyond our pow'r; For, if our stock be very small, 'Tis prudent to enjoy it all,

Nor lose the present hour.
NATHANIEL COTTONThe Fireside. St. 10.

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Enjoy the present hour, be thankful for the past, And neither fear nor wish th' approaches of the

last. COWLEY-Imitations. Martial. Bk. X. Ep.

XLVII.

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So well to know Her own, that what she wills to do or say Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best.

MILTONParadise Lost. Bk. VIII. L. 548.

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No eye to watch, and no tongue to wound us, All earth forgot, and all heaven around us!

MOORE—Come O'er the Sea.

Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile, And cry, "Content" to that which grieves my

heart; And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions.

Henry VI. Pt. III. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 182. 'Tis better to be lowly born, And range with humble livers in content, Than to be perk’d up in a glistering grief, And wear a golden sorrow.

Henry VIII. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 19.

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Vive sine invidia, mollesque inglorius annos
Exige; amicitias et tibi junge pares.

May you live unenvied, and pass many pleasant years unknown to fame; and also have congenial friends. OVID-Tristium. III. 4. 43.

8 The eagle nestles near the sun; The dove's low nest for me!

The eagle's on the crag; sweet one,

The dove's in our green tree!
For hearts that beat like thine and mine

Heaven blesses humble earth;-
The angels of our Heaven shall shine
The angels of our Hearth!
J. J. PLATT-A Song of Content.

Our content Is our best having.

Henry VIII. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 23.

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Si animus est æquus tibi satis habes, qui bene vitam colas.

If you are content, you have enough to live comfortably. PLAUTUS-Aulularia. II. 2. 10.

10 Habeas ut nactus: nota mala res optima est.

Keep what you have got; the known evil is best. PLAUTUS—Trinummus. I. 2. 25.

11 Whate'er the passion, knowledge, fame, or pelf, Not one will change his neighbor with himself.

POPE-Essay on Man. Ep. II. L. 261.

"Tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve.

Romeo and Juliet. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 100

23 Not on the outer world

For inward joy depend; Enjoy the luxury of thought,

Make thine own self friend;
Not with the restless throng,

In search of solace roam
But with an independent zeal

Be intimate at home.
LYDIA SIGOURNEY-Know Thyself.

24 The noblest mind the best contentment has. SPENSER—Faerie Queene. Bk. I. Canto I. St.

35.

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I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness; glad of other men's good, content with my harm. As You Like It. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 77.

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But curb thou the high spirit in thy breast,
For gentle ways are best, and keep aloof
From sharp contentions.
HOMER-Iliad. Bk. LX. L. 317. BRYANT'S

trans.

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A man of strife and a man of contention.

Jeremiah. XV. 10.

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Mansit concordia discors.

Agreement exists in disagreement.
LUCANPharsalia. I. 98.

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This is the charm, by sages often told,
Converting all it touches into gold:
Content can soothe, where'er by fortune placed,
Can rear a garden in the desert waste.

HENRY KIRK WHITE—Clifton Grove. L. 130. There is a jewel which no Indian mines can buy,

No chymic art can counterfeit;
It makes men rich in greatest poverty,

Makes water wine; turns wooden cups to gold;

The homely whistle to sweet music's strain, Seldom it comes;—to few from Heaven sent, That much in little, all in naught, Content.

JOHN WILBYE-Madrigales. There Is a Jewel. CONTENTION (See also DISSENSION, QUAR

RELLING) Did thrust (as now) in others' corn his sickle. Du BARTAS-Divine Weekes and Workes. Sec

ond Week, Second Day. Pt. II. He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. BURKE-Reflections on the Revolution in France.

Vol. III. P. 195.

Ducibus tantum de funere pugna est.

The chiefs contend only for their place of burial. LUCAN-Pharsalia. VI. 811.

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If a house be divided against itself, that house cannot stand.

Mark. III. 25.

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Irritabis crabrones.

You will stir up the hornets.
PLAUTUS-Amphitruo. Act II. 2. 75.

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'Tis a hydra's head contention; the more they strive the more they may: and as Praxiteles did by his glass, when he saw a scurvy face in it, brake it in pieces; but for that one he saw many more as bad in a moment. BURTON--Anatomy of Melancholy. Pt. II.

Sc. 3. Mem. 7.

A continual dropping in a very rainy day and a contentious woman are alike.

Proverbs. XXVII. 15.

22 Irriter les freslons.

Stir up the hornets. RABELAIS-Pantagruel. 23

Contentions fierce, Ardent, and dire, spring from no petty cause.

SCOTT—Peveril of the Peak. Ch. XL.

Et le combat cessa, faute de combattants.

And the combat ceased, for want of combatants. CORNEILLE—Le Cid. IV. 3.

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Great contest follows, and much learned dust Involves the combatants; each claiming truth, And truth disclaiming both.

COWPER—Task. Bk. III. L. 161.

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Tota hujus mundi concordia ex discordibus constat.

The whole concord of this world consists in discords. SENECA—Nat. Quæst. Bk. VII. 27.

25 Thus when a barber and collier fight, The barber beats the luckless collier—white; The dusty collier heaves his ponderous sack, And, big with vengeance, beats the barber

black. In comes the brick-dust man, with grime o'er

spread, And beats the collier and the barber-red;

So when two dogs are fighting in the streets,
When a third dog one of the two dogs meets:
With angry teeth he bites him to the bone,
And this dog smarts for what that dog has done.
HENRY FIELDING-Tom Thumb the Great. Act
I. Sc. 5. L. 55.

(See also SMART)

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Black, red, and white, in various clouds are toss'd, And in the dust they raise the combatants are His conversation does not show the minute lost.

hand; but he strikes the hour very correctly. CHRISTOPHER SMART—Soliloquy of the Princess SAMUEL JOHNSON —Johnsoniana. Kearsley.

Periwinkle in A Trip to Cambridge. See L. 604.
CAMPBELL'S Specimens of the British Poets.
Vol. VI. P. 185.

Tom Birch is as brisk as a bee in conversation; (See also FIELDING)

but no sooner does he take a pen in his hand, than

it becomes a torpedo to him, and benumbs all his Nimium altercando veritas amittitur.

faculties. In excessive altercation, truth is lost.

SAMUEL JOHNSON-Boswell's Life. (1743) SYRUS-Maxims.

Questioning is not the mode of conversation CONVERSATION

among gentlemen. Method is not less requisite in ordinary con

SAMUEL JOHNSONBoswell's Life. (1776) versation than in writing, provided a man would talk to make himself understood.

A single conversation across the table with a ADDISONThe Spectator, No. 476.

wise an is better than ten years' study of books. 3

LONGFELLOWHyperion. Ch. VII. Quoted With good and gentle-humored hearts

from the Chinese. I choose to chat where'er I come Whate'er the subject be that starts.

Men of great conversational powers almost But if I get among the glum

universally practise a sort of lively sophistry and I hold my tongue to tell the truth

exaggeration which deceives for the moment both And keep my breath to cool my broth.

themselves and their auditors. JOHN BYROM-Careless Content.

MACAULAY-Essay. On the Athenian Orators. In conversation avoid the extremes of forwardness and reserve.

With thee conversing I forget all time: CATO.

All seasons and their change, all please alike.

MILTON—Paradise Lost. Bk. IV. L. 639. 5

(See also GAY) But conversation, choose what theme we may, And chiefly when religion leads the way,

Inject a few raisins of conversation into the Should flow, like waters after summer show'rs,

tasteless dough of existence. Not as if raised by mere mechanic powers.

O. HENRYThe Complete Life of John Hopkins. COWPER-Conversation. L. 703. Conversation is a game of circles.

Form'd by thy converse, happily to steer EMERSONEssays. Circles.

From grave to gay, from lively to severe.

POPE-Essay on Man. Ep. IV. L. 379. Conversation is the laboratory and workshop

(See also BOILEAU under POETS) of the student.

We took sweet counsel together.
EMERSON—Society and Solitude. Clubs.

Psalms. LV. 14.
8
I never, with important air,
In conversation overbear.

Ita fabulantur ut qui sciant Dominum audire.

They converse as those who know that God

hears. My tongue within my lips I rein; For who talks much must talk in vain.

TERTULLIAN—Apologeticus. P. 36. (Ed. Rigalt) GarFables. Pt. I. Introduction. L. 53.

A dearth of words a woman need not fear; With thee conversing I forget the way.

But 'tis a task indeed to learn to hear: GAY—Trivia. Bk. II. L. 480.

In that the skill of conversation lies; 10

That shows or makes you both polite and wise. They would talk of nothing but high life and

YOUNG-Love of Fame. Satire V. L. 57. high-lived company, with other fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakespeare, and

CONVOLVULUS the musical glasses.

Convolvulus GOLDSMITH-Vicar of Wakefield. Ch. IX.

There is an herb named in Latine Convolvulus 11

(i. e. with wind), growing among shrubs and And when you stick on conversation's burs,

bushes, which carrieth a flower not unlike to this Don't strew your pathway with those dreadful Lilly, save that it yeeldeth no smell nor hath those

urs.
HOLMES—A Rhymed Lesson. Urania.

chives within; for whitenesse they resemble one

another very much, as if Nature in making this 12

floure were a learning and trying her skill how to Discourse, the sweeter banquet of the mind. frame the Lilly indeed. HOMERThe Odyssey. Bk. 15. L. 433. PLINYNatural History. Bk. XXI. Ch. X. Pope's trans.

HOLLAND's trans.

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