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20 "Tis no sin love's fruits to steal; But the sweet thefts to reveal; To be taken, to be seen, These have crimes accounted been. BEN Jonson—Volpone. Act III. Sc. 6. 21 Sejudice, nemonocens absolvitur. By his own verdict no guilty man was ever acquitted. JUVENAL–Satires. XIII. 2. 22 Multi committunt easlem diverso crimina fato; Ille crucem scleris pretium tulit, hic diadema. Many commit the same crimes with a very different result. One bears a cross for his crime; another a crown. JUVENAL–Satires. XIII. 103. 23 Nam scelus intrase tacitum qui cogitat ullum, Facti crimen habet. For whoever meditates a crime is guilty of the deed. JUVENAL–Satires. XIII. 209.

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1 A man must serve his time to every trade Save censure—critics all are ready made. Take hackney’d jokes from Miller, got by rote, With just enough of learning to misquote; A mind well skill'd to find or forge a fault; A turn for punning, call it Attic salt; To Jeffrey go, be silent and discreet, His pay is just ten sterling pounds per sheet; Fear not to lie, 'twill seem a lucky hit; Shrink not from blasphemy, 'twill pass for wit; Care not for feeling—pass your proper jest, And stand a critic, hated yet caress'd.

BYRON-English Bards and Scotch Reviewers.

L. 63.

2 - As soon
Seek roses in December—ice in June,
Hope, constancy in wind, or corn in chaff;
Believe a woman or an epitaph,
Or any other thing that's false, before
You trust in critics.

Bowen Bards and Scotch Reviewers.

3 Dijó la sarten à la caldera, quitate allá of negra. Said the pot to the kettle, “Get away, blackface.” CERVANTEs—Don Quixote. II. 67.

4 Who shall dispute what the Reviewers say? Their word's sufficient; and to ask a reason, In soch a state as theirs, is downright treason.

CHURCHILL-Apology. L. 94.

5

Though by whim, envy, or resentment led,

They damn those authors whom they never read. CHURCHILL-The Candidate. L. 57.

6 A servile race Who, in mere want of fault, all merit place; Who blind obedience pay to ancient schools, Bigots to Greece, and slaves to musty rules.

CHURCHILL-The Rosciad. L. 183.

7 But spite of all the criticizing elves, Those who would make us feel—must feel them

selves. CHURCHILL–The Rosciad. L. 961.

8

Reviewers are usually people who would have been poets, historians, biographers, etc., if they could: they have tried their talents at one or the other, and have failed; therefore they turn critics.

CoLERIDGE—Lectures on Shakespeare and Mil(See also DISRAELI, MACAULAY, SHELLEY; also

BISMARCK under Journalism)

9 Too nicely Jonson knew the critic's part, Nature in him was almost lost in art.

CoLLINs—Epistle to Sir Thomas Hanmer on

his Edition of Shakespeare.

10 There are some Critics so with Spleen diseased, They scarcely come inclining to be pleased: And sure he must have more than mortal Skill, Who pleases one against his Will.

CoNGREve—The Way of the World. Epilogue.

11 La critique est aisée, et l'art est difficile.

Criticism is easy, and art is difficult.

DESTOUCHEs—Glorieur. II. 5.

12 The press, the pulpit, and the stage, Conspire to censure and expose our age. WENTwoRTH DILLON-Essay on Translated Verse. L. 7. 13 You know who critics are?—the men who have failed in literature and art. BENJ. DisrAELI–Lothair. Ch. XXXV. (See also Col.FRIDGE)

14 It is much easier to be critical than to be correct. BENJ. DISRAELI—Speech in the House of Commons. Jan 24, 1860.

15 The most noble criticism is that in which the critic is not the antagonist so much as the rival of the author. Isaac D'IsrAELI — Curiosities of Literature. Literary Journals.

16 Those who do not read criticism will rarely merit to be criticised. Isaac D'IsrAELI–Literary Character of Men of Genius. Ch. VI.

17 Ill writers are usually the sharpest censors. DRYDEN–Dedication of translations from Ovid.

18 They who write ill, and they who ne'er durst write, Turn critics out of mere revenge and spite. DRYDEN–Prologue to Conquest of Granada.

19 All who (like him) have writill plays before, For . like thieves, condemned, are hangmen made, To execute the members of their trade. DRYDEN–Prologue to Rival Queens.

20

“I’m an owl: you're another. Sir Critic, good day.” And the barber kept on shaving.

JAMES T. FIELDS—The Owl-Critic.

21 Blame where you must, be candid where you can, And be each critic the Good-natured Man.

GoLDSMITH-The Good-Natured Man. Epi

22 Reviewers are forever telling authors they

can't understand them. The author might often

reply: Is that my fault?
J. C. AND A. W. HARE-Guesses at Truth.

23 The readers and the hearers like my books, And yet some writers cannot them digest; But what care I? for when I make a feast, I would my guests should praise it, not the cooks. SIR John HARRINGTON.—Against Writers that Carp at other Men's Books.

24 When Poets' plots in plays are damn'd for spite, They critics turn and damn the rest that write. John HAYNEs—Prologue. In Oxford and Cambridge Miscellany Poems. Ed. by ELIJAH FENTON.

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