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Though only one for you shall care, 12 -
One only speak your praises; The Rose has but a Summer reign,

And you never wear in your shining hair, The daisy never dies.
A richer flower than daisies. MoNTGoMERY-The Daisy. On Finding One in
PHEBE CARY—The Fortune in the Daisy. Bloom on Christmas Day.

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1 He, perfect dancer, climbs the rope, DANDELION And balances your fear and hope. Tarazacum Dens-leonis

PRIOR-Alma. Canto II. L. 9.

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14 You cannot forget if you would those golden kisses all over the cheeks of the meadow, queerly called dandelions. HENRY WARD BEECHER—Star Papers. A Discourse of Flowers. 15 Upon a showery night and still, Without a sound of warning, A trooper band surprised the hill, And held it in the morning. We were not waked by bugle notes, No cheer our dreams invaded, And yet at dawn, their yellow coats On the green slopes paraded. HELEN GRAY CONE—The Dandelions.

16 Dear common flower, that grow'st beside the

way, Fringing the dusty road with harmless gold, First pledge of blithesome May, Which children pluck, and, full of pride, uphold, High-hearted buccaneers, o'erjoyed that they An Eldorado in the grass have id Which not the rich earth's ample round May match in wealth, thou art more dear to me Than all the prouder summer-blooms may be. Low ELL–To the Dandelion. 17 Young Dandelion On a hedge-side, Said young Dandelion who libe my bride?

Said young Dandelion
With a sweet air,

I have my eye on
Miss Daisy fair.
D. M. MULock—Young Dandelion.

18 DANGER Anguis sub viridi herba. There's a snake in the grass. BACON. Quoted in Essays. Of a King. (See also VERGIL)

19 The wolf was sick, he vowed a monk to be; But when he got well, a wolf once more was he. In WALTER Bow ER's Scotichronicon. (15th cent.). Found in MS. Black Book of Paisley in British Museum. End. (See also RABELAIs)

20 I have not quailed to danger's brow When high and happy—need I now?

BYRON-Giaour. L. 1,035.

21

In summo periculo timor misericordiam non recipit.

In extreme danger, fear turns a deaf ear to every feeling of pity. CAESAR–Bellum Gallicum. VII. 26.

22
Let him that thinketh he standeth take heed

lest he fall. -
I Corinthians. X. 12.

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4. For all on a razor's edge it stands. HoweR-Iliad. Bk. X. L. 173. Same use in HERodotus. VI. XXII. 5. Periculosae plenum opus aleae Tractas, et incedisperignes Suppositos cineri doloso. You are dealing with a work full of dangerous hazard, and you are venturing upon fires overlaid with treacherous ashes. HoRace–Odes. Bk. II. 1. 6. The following line (authorship unknown) is sometimes added: “Simorbum fugiens incidis in medicos” In fleeing disease you fall into the hands of the doctors. o id quisquevitet nunquam hominisatis tum estinhoras. Man is never watchful enough against dangers that threaten him every hour. Horace–Carmina. II. 13. 13.

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Some said: “Put a fence round the edge of the

Some: “An ambulance down in the valley.”

Joseph MALINEs—Fence or A nce. Appeared in the Virginia Health Bulletin with title Prevention and Cure.

9. What a sea Of melting ice I walk on! MAssingFR—Maid of Honor. Act III. Sc. 3.

10

Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor for . . . the destruction that wasteth at noonday.

Psalms. XCI. 6.

11 Passato il pericolo (or punto) gabbato il santo.

When the danger's past the saint is cheated.

RABELAIs—Pantagruel. IV. 24. Quoted as a

proverb.

12 AEgrotatDaemon; monachus tunc esse volebat, Daemon convaluit; Daemon ante fuit.

Mediaeval Latin.

The devil was sick, the devil a monk would be;

The devil was well, the devil a monk was he.

As trans, by URQUHART AND MoTTEUx.

13 (See also BowFR)

Sur un mince chrystal l’hyver conduit leurs pas,
Telle est denos plaisirs la legere surface,
Glissez mortels; n'appuyez pas.
O'er the ice the rapid skater flies.
With sport above and death below,
Where mischief lurks in gay disguise
Thus lightly touch and quickly go.
PIERRE CHARLEs Roy. Lines under a picture
of skaters, a print of a painting by LAN-
CRET. Trans. by SAMUEL Johnson. See
Piozzi, Anecdotes.
14
Scit eum sine gloria vinci, qui sine periculo
vincitur.
He knows that the man is overcome in-
loriously, who is overcome without danger.
SENECA–De Providentia. III.

15 Contemptum periculorum assiduitas periclitandidabit. Constant exposure to dangers will breed contempt for them. SENECA–De Providentia. IV. 16 Iln'y a personne quine soit dangereux pour quelqu'un. There is no person who is not dangerous for Some one. MME, DE Sávigns—Lettres.

17 For though I am not splenitive and rash, Yet have I something in me dangerous,

Hamlet. Act V. . 1. L. 285.

1s Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety. Henry IV. Pt. I. Act II. Sc. 3.

19 We have scotched the snake, not killed it: She'll close and be herself, whilst our poor malice Remains in danger of our former tooth. Macbeth. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 13.

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