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11 Undique enim ad inferos tantundem via est. There are countless roads on all sides to the

grave. CICERo-Tusculanarum Disputationum. I.43. 12 Supremus ille dies non nostri extinctionem sed commutationem affert loci. That last day does not bring extinction to us, but change of place. CICERo-Tusculanarum Disputationum. I.49. 13 Some men make a womanish complaint that it is a great misfortune to die before our time. I would ask what time? Is it that of Nature? But she, indeed, has lent us life, as we do a sum of money, only no certain day is fixed for payment. What reason then to complain if she demands it at pleasure, since it was on this condition that you received it. CICERo. 14 Omnia mors acquat. Death levels all things. CLAUDLANUs—De Raptu Proserpinae. II. 302. 15 Mors dominos servis et sceptraligonibus aequat, Dissimiles simili conditione trahens. Death levels master and slave, the sceptre and the law and makes the unlike like. In WALTER Colman's La Danse Machabre or Death's Duell. (Circa 1633) 16 Mors sceptra ligonibus aequat. Inscribed over a 14th Century mural painting once at Battle Church, Sussex... Included in the 12th Century Vers sur la Mort. Ascribed to Thibaut de Marly. Also the motto of one of Symeoni's emblematic devices. See Notes and Queries, May, 1917. P. 134. (See also SHIRLEY)

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1 12

The mossy marbles rest We all do fade as a leaf.

On the lips that he has pressed Isaiah. LXIV. 6.

In their bloom; And the names he loved to hear Have been carved for many a year

On the tomb.

Holmes—The Last Leaf.

2

Behold—not him we knew!

This was the prison which hissoul looked through. Holmes—The Last Look.

3. And they die An equal death, the idler and the man Of mighty deeds. Homert–Iliad. Bk. IX. L. 396. BRYANT's trans. 4 He slept an iron sleep, + Slain fighting for his country. HoMER—Iliad. Bk. XI. L. 285. BRYANT's trans.

5 One more unfortunate Weary of breath, Rashly importunate, Gone to her death! Hood—Bridge of Sighs.

6 We watch'd her breathing thro' the night, Her breathing soft and low, As in her breast the wave of life Kopt heaving to and fro. +

Our very hopes belied our fears,
Our fears our hopes belied;

We thought her dying when she slept,
And sleeping when she died.
Hood—The Death-bed.

7 Pallida mors acquo pulsat pede pauperum tabernas

Regumque turres.
Pale death, with impartial step, knocks at
the hut of the poor and the towers of kings.
HoRACE—Carmina. I. 4. 13.

8 Omnes una manet nox, Et calcanda semel via leti. One night is awaiting us all, and the way of death must be trodden once. HoRACE—Carmina. I. 28. 15.

9. Omnes eodem cogimur; omnium Versatur urna serius, ocius Sors exitura. We are all compelled to take the same road; from the urn of death, shaken for all, sooner or later the lot must come forth. HoRACE—Carmina. II. 3. 25. 10 Omne capax movet urna nomen. In the capacious urn of death, every name is shaken. HoRACE—Carmina. III. 1. 16. 11 Cita mors ruit. Swift death rushes upon us. HoRACE. Adapted from Sat.1. 8.

13 The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken *; *: the name of the Lord.

14 He shall return no more to his house, neither

shall his place know him any more. Job. VII. 10.”

15 The land of darkness and the shadow of death. Job. X. 21.

16 Then with no fiery throbbing pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest wav. SAMUEL Johnson—Verses on the han of Mr. Robert Levet. St. 9. (“No fiery throbs of pain” in first ed.)

17 Thou art but gone before, Whither the world must follow. BEN Jonson—Epitaph on Sir John Roe. In Dodd's Epigrammatists. P. 190. (See also HENRY)

18 Mors sola fatetur Quantula sint hominum corpuscula. Death alone discloses how insignificant are the puny bodies of men. JUVENAL–Satires. X. 172.

19

Trust to a plank, draw precarious breath,

At most seven incbes from the jaws of death. JUVENAL–Satires. XII. GIFFord's

trans. (See also DU BARTAs, LUCRETIUs, Twelfth NIGHT) 20 Nemo impetrare potest a papa bullam nunquam moriendi. No one can obtain from the Pope a dispensation for never dying. THOMAs A KEMPIs. (See also MoLIAERE)

21 Nay, why should I fear Death, Who gives us life, and in exchange takes breath? FREDERIC L. KNowLEs—Laus Mortis.

22 When I have folded up this tent And laid the soiled thing by, I shall go forth 'neath different stars, Under an unknown sky. FREDERIC L. KNowLEs—The Last Word.

23 Gone before To that unknown and silent shore. LAMB—Hester. St. 1.

24

One destin'd period men in common have,

The great, the base, the coward, and the brave,

All food alike for worms, companions in the grave. LoRD LANsdown E—Meditation on Death.

25
Neither the sun nor death can be looked at

with a steady eye.
LA Rochefoucauld–Marims. 36.

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