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1. Wake up England. KING GEORGE W., when Prince of Wales. i. at Guildhall after a trip around the World.

2

He is an Englishman!
For he himself has said it,
And it's greatly to his credit,

That he's an Englishman!

For he might have been a Rooshian A French or Turk or Proosian, Or perhaps Itali-an. But in spite of all temptations To belong to other nations, He remains an Englishman. W. S. GILBERT-H. M. S. Pinafore. (See also Cook)

3. The land of scholars, and the nurse of arms. GoLDSMITH-The Traveller. L. 356.

4 We have stood alone in that which is called isolation—our splendid isolation, as one of our Colonial friends was good enough to call it. LoRD GoscHEN–Speech at Lewes. (Feb. 26, 1896) (See also FostFR)

5 Anglica gensest optima flenset pessima ridens. The English race is the best at weeping and the worst at laughing. (The English take their pleasures sadly.) THOMAS HEARNE–Reliquiae Hearnianae. Ed. 1857. Wol. I. P. 136. (Source referred to CHAMBERLAYNE–Anglicae Notitia. (1669) From old Latin saying quoted in KoRNMANNUs—De Linea. Amoris. Ch. II. P. 47. (Ed. 1610) BINDER—Novus The-. saurus Adagiorum Latinorum. No. 2983. NEANDER's Ethic Vetus et Sapiens (1590) (With “sed” not “et,” “Rustica” not “Anglica.” (See also FRoissart)

6

What have I done for you,
England, my England?

What is there I would not do,
England, my own?
W. E. HENLEY-England, My England.

7

His home!—the Western giant smiles,
And turns the spotty globe to find it;-

This little speck the British Isles?
'Tis but a freckle-never mind it.
Holmes—A Good Time Going.

8 Old England is our home and Englishmen are we, Our tongue is known in every clime, our flag on every sea. MARY HowITT–Old England is Our Home. (See also KIPLING, RICHARDs)

9 The whole [English] nation, beyond all other mortal men is most given to banquetting and feasts. PAULUs Jovius—Hist. Bk. II. Trans. by BURTON.—Anat. of Melancholy. 4See also CARLYLE)

10 Never was isle so little, never was sea so lone, But over the scud and the palm-trees an English flag was flown. KIPLING—English Flag. (See also HowitT)

11 Winds of the World give answer! They are Adopods. what sho ey know o who only England know?— KIPLING—English Flag.

12 Whether splendidly isolated or dangerously isolated, I will not now debate; but for my part, I think splendidly isolated, because this isolation of England comes from her superiority. SIR WILFRED LAURIER—Speech in the Canadian House of Assembly, Feb. 5, 1896. (See also Foster)

13 The .ew World's sons from England's breast we eW Such milk as bids remember whence we came, Proud of her past wherefrom our future grew, This window we inscribe with Raleigh's fame. Lowell. Inscription on the Window presented to St. Margaret's Church, Westminster, London, by American citizens in honor of Sir Walter Raleigh. (1882) 14 Non seulement l’Angleterre, mais chaque Anglais est une ile. Not only England, but every Englishman is an island. NovaLis—Fragments. (1799)

15 Let us hope that England, having saved herself by her energy, may save Europe by her example. WILLIAM PITT. In his last Speech, made at the Lord Mayor's Banquet at Guildhall. (Nov. 9, 1805) As reported by MACAULAY —Misc. Writings. Vol. II. P. 368. But Europe is not to be saved by any single man. England has saved herself by her exertions, and will, as I trust, save Europe o her example. STANHoPE's—Life of Pitt. Vol. IV. P. 346. Reported as told him by the DUKE of WELLINGTON. (1838) Neither the Morning Herald, nor the Times of Nov. 11, 1805 mention these words in comment on the speech. The London Chronicle and St. James's Chronicle give different versions. 16 o Edward] was careful not to tear England violently from the splendid isolation in which she had wrapped herself. PoincARÉ—Speech at Cannes. (April 13, 1912) (See also Foster)

17 Oh, when shall Britain, conscious of her claim, Stand emulous of Greek and Roman fame? In living medals see her wars enroll'd, And vanquished realms supply recording gold? Polow Essays. Epistle to Addison, . 53.

18 Dieu et mon droit. God and o right. Password of the day given by RICHARD I, to his

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ENGLAND ENJOYMENT

army at the battle of Gisors. In memory of Where'er the light of day be:
the victory it was made the motto of the There are no men like Englishmen,

England. TENNYson—Foresters. Song.
(See also HowTTT)

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royal arms of England. So tall and bold as they be! l And these will strike for England, The martial airs of England And man and maid be free Encircle still the earth. To foil and spoil the tyrant | AMELLA. B. Richards—The Martial Airs of Beneath the nwood tree. |

9
First drink a health, this solemn night,
A health to England, every guest;
That man's the best cosmopolite,
Who loves his native country best.
May Freedom's oak forever live
With stronger life from day to day;

But see thy fault!
Henry V. Act II. Chorus. L. 16.

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That man's the true Conservative
Who lops the moulder'd branch away.
Hands all round!
God the tyrant's hope confound!
To this great cause of Freedom drink, my friends,
And the great name of England round and round.
TENNyson—Hands all around. In Memoirs
of TENNYsoN by his son. Vol. I. P. 345.
10
When Britain first at Heaven's command,
Arose from out the azure main,
This was the charter of the land,
And guardian angels sung this strain;
“Rule Britannial rule the waves;
Britons never will be slaves.”
JAMEs THoMson—Masque of Alfred. Writ-
ten by THoMPsoN AND MALLET. MALLET
rearranged the Masque Alfred for the stage,
and introduced Thompson's Song. See DR.
Powe edition of MALLET. (1851)
. 292.

11
A shopkeeper will never get the more custom
by beating his customers, and what is true of a
shopkeeper is true of a shopkeeping nation.
osiah TUCKER—Four Tracts on Political and
Commercial Subjects.
(The words are said to have been used by Dr.
Tucker, in a sermon, some years before they
appeared in print.)
(See also BARRERE)

12
Froth at the top, dregs at bottom, but the

middle excellent.
Voltaire—Description of the English Nation.

13
Set in this stormy Northern sea,
Queen of these restless fields of tide,
England! what shall men say of thee,
Before whose feet the worlds divide?
OscaR WILDE—Ave Imperatriz.

14 ENJOYMENT

For Solomon, he lived at ease, and full

Of honour, wealth, high fare, aimed not beyond

Higher design than to enjoy his state.
MILTON.—Paradise Regained. Bk. II. L.201.

15
Though throned in highest bliss
Equal to God, and equally enjoying
God-like fruition.

MILTON.—Paradise Lost. Bk. III. L. 305.

16 Who can enjoy alone?
Or all enjoying what contentment find?
MILTON.—Paradise Lost. Bk. VIII. L. 365.

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