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ENTHUSLASM

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However, 'tis expedient to be wary:
Indifference certes don't produce distress;
And rash enthusiasm in good society
Were nothing but a moral inebriety.

BYRON-Don Juan. Canto XIII. St. 35.

9 No wild enthusiast ever yet could rest, Till half mankind were like himself possess'd.

CowPER—Progress of Error. L. 470.

10

Enthusiasm is that secret and harmonious spirit which hovers over the production of genius, throwing the reader of a book, or the spectator of a statue, into the very ideal presence whence these works have really originated. great work always leaves us in a state of musing.

Isaac D'IsrAELI–Literary Character. Ch.

XII. Last lines.

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24 Ego sirisi quod ineptus Pastillos Rufillusolet, Gargonius hircum, lividus et mordax videar? If I smile at the strong perfumes of the silly Rufillus must I be regarded as envious and ill-natured? HoRACE—Satires. I. 4. 91.

25 Envy! eldest-born of hell! CHARLEs JENNENs of Gopsall. Also ascribed to NEwBURGH HAMILTON. Chorus of HANDEL's Oratorio, Saul. 26 Invidiam, tamguam ignem, summa petere, Envy, like fire, soars upward. Livy—Annales. VIII. 31.

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10 In seeking tales and informations Against this man, whose honesty the devil And his disciples only envy at, Yeblew the fire that burns ye. Henry VIII. Act V. Sc. 3. L. 110. 11 Such men as he benever at heart's ease Whiles they behold a greater than themselves: And therefore are they *go; Julius Caesar. Act I. . 2. L. 208.

12 No metal can, No, not the hangman's axe, bear half the keen

ness Of thy sharp envy. Merchant of Venice. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 124. 13 Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Benother maid, since she is envious. Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 4.

14. We make ourselves fools, to disport ourselves; And spend our flatteries, to drink those men Upon whose age we void it up again, With poisonous spite and envy. Timon of Athens. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 141.

15 The general's disdain'd
By him one step below; he by the next;
That next by him beneath; so every step,
Exampled by the first pace that is sick
Of his superior, grows to an envious fever
Of pale and bloodless emulation.

Troilus and Cressida. Act I. Sc. 3. L. 129.

16

Base Envy withers at another's joy,

And hates that excellence it cannot reach. THoMSoN–The Seasons. Spring. L. 28.

17 EPIGRAMS

What is an epigram? a dwarfish whole,
Its body brevity, and wit its soul.
Author unknown. See BRANDER MATTHEws
—American Epigrams. Harper's Mag.,
Nov., 1903.

18 The diamond's virtues well might grace The epigram, and both excel In brilliancy in smallest space, And power to cut as well. GEORGE BIRDSEYE. See BRANDER MATTHEws, Harper's Mag., Nov., 1903. (See also YRLARTE) 19 Lumine Acon dextre-capta est Leonillasinistre, Et potis est forma vincere utergue dees: Blande puer, lumen quod habes concede sorori, Sic tu cascus Amor, sic erit illa Venus. Acon his right, Leonilla her left eye Doth want; yet each inform, the gods out-vie. Sweet boy, with thine, thy sister's sight im

proved: So shall she Venus be, thou God of Love. Epigram said to be the “most celebrated of modern o * WARTON, in his Essay on Pope. I. . 299. (Éd. 1772) Trans, as given in a Collection of Epigrams. Vol. I. No. 223.

20 Unlike my subject, I will make my song. It shall be witty, and it shan’t be long. CHESTERFIELD. See note by CRokER in Boswell's Life of Johnson, July 19, 1763. (When SIR THoMAs Robinson asked for an epigram on his friend LoNG.)

21 This picture, plac'd the busts between Gives Satire all its strength; Wisdom and Wit are little seen While Folly glares at length. Epigram on the portrait of BEAU NASH placed between the busts of Pope and NEwToN in the Pump Room at Bath, England. Attributed to LoRD CHESTERFIELD by DR. MATTHEw MATY in his Memoirs of Chesterfield. Sec. IV, prefixed to second ed. of Miscellaneous Works of the Earl of Chesterfield. LockBR-LAMPsoN credits only four of the lines of the whole epigram to Chesterfield. JANE BREREToN given credit for them. (See poems. 1744.) A copy of the poems of HENRY North Is (1740) in the British Museum contains the lines. See Notes and Queries, Feb. 10, 1917. P. 119; also Aug., 1917. P. 379.

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12

Shrine of the mighty! can it be,

That this is all remains of thee? BYRON-Giaour. L. 106.

13 Kind reader! take your choice to cry or laugh; Here HARold lies—but where's his Epitaph? If such you seek, try Westminster, and view Ten thousand, just as fit for him as you. ByRoN–Substitute for an Epitaph. 14 Yet at the resurrection we shall see A fair edition, and of matchless worth, Free from erratas, new in heaven set forth. Joseph CAPEN-Lines upon Mr. John Foster. Borrowed from REv. B. WooDBRIDGE. (See also FRANKLIN, GEDGE, MEADER, QUARLEs, SMollett)

15 Loe here the precious dust is layd; Whose purely-temper'd clay was made So fine that it the guest betray'd. Else the soule grew so fast within, It broke the outward shell of sinne And so was hatch'd a cherubin. THos. CAREw—Inscription on Tomb of Lady Maria Wentworth. In Toddington Church, Bedfordshire, England.

16 This Mirabeau's work, then, is done. He

sleeps with the primeval giants. He has gone

over to the majority: “Abiit ad plures.” CARLYLE-Essay on Mirabeau. Close.

17

It is so soon that I am done for,

I wonder what I was begun for! Epitaph in Cheltenham Church-yard.

18 Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, Death came with friendly care; The opening bud to Heaven conveyed, And bade it blossom there. CoLERIDGE-Epitaph on an Infant.

19 Peas to his Hashes. Epitaph on a Cook (London).

20 Underneath this crust Lies the mouldering dust Of Eleanor Batchelor Shoven, Well versed in the arts Of pies, custards and tarts, And the lucrative trade of the oven. When she lived long enough, She made her last puff, A puff by her husband much praised, And now she doth lie And make a dirt pie, In hopes that her crust may be raised. Epitaph on a Cook (Yorkshire). 21 What wee gave, wee have; What wee spent, wee had; What wee left, wee lost. Epitaph on Edward CourTENAY, EARL of DEvoN. (1419). In CLEveLAND's Geneal. Hist. of the Family of Courtenay. P. 142. Said to be on atomb in Padua. Attributed to CARLYLE; not found. Like inscriptions are found on many old tombstones. The oldest

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16

Here lies Fred,

Who was alive and is dead.

Had it been his father,

I had much rather.

Had it been his brother,

Still better than another.

Had it been his sister,

No one would have missed her.

Had it been the whole generation,

Still better for the nation.

But since 'tis only Fred,

Who was alive, and is dead,

There's no more to be said.

Epitaph to FREDERick, PRINCE of WALEs

(Father of George III), as given by THAckERAY-Four Georges. Probably version of a French epigram “Colas est morte demaladie,” found in Les Epigrammes de Jean Ogier Gombauld. (1658) Several early versions of same. See Notes and Queries. May 3, 1902. P. 345.

17 “Fuller's earth.” THoMAS FULLER-Epitaph written by Himself.

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