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“Des humeurs desraisonnables des hommes, il semble que les philosophes mesmes se desfacent plus tard et plus envy de cette cy que de nulle autre: c'est la plus revesche et opiniastre; quia etiam bene proficientes animos tentare non cessat.

Of the unreasoning humours of mankind it seems that (fame) is the one of which the philosophers themselves have disengaged themselves from last and with the most reluctance: it is the most intra le obstinate; for (as St. Augustine says) it persists in tempting even minds nobly inclined." MONTAIGNE Essays. Bk. I. Ch. XLI.

Quoting the Latin from St. AUGUSTINE
De Civit. Dei. 5. 14.

(See also MASSINGER)
I'll make thee glorious by my pen
And famous by my sword.
MARQUIS OF MONTROSE—My Dear and Only

Love. (See also Scott)

Unblemish'd let me live or die unknown;
Oh, grant an honest fame, or grant me none!

POPE—Temple of Fame. L. 523.

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Omnia post obitum fingit majora vetustas:
Majus ab exsequiis nomen in ora venit.

Time magnifies everything after death; a man's fame is increased as it passes from mouth to mouth after his burial. PROPERTIUSElegiæ. III. 1. 23.

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Ingenio stimulos subdere fama solet.

The love of fame usually spurs on the mind. OVID-Tristium. V. 1. 76.

Your fame shall (spite of proverbs) make it plain
To write in water 's not to write in vain.
ANON. in preface to SIR WILLIAM SANDERSON

-Art of Painting in Water Colours. (1658)

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May see thee now, though late, redeem thy name,
And glorify what else is damn'd to fame.
RICHARD SAVAGE Character of the Rev. James

Foster. L. 43.
I'll make thee famous by my pen,
And glorious by my sword.
SCOTT— Legend of Montrose. Ch. XV.

(See also MONTROSE) 3 Better to leave undone, than by our deed Acquire too high a fame, when him we serve's

away. Antony and Cleopatra. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 14. Let fame, that all hunt after in their lives, Live register'd upon our brazen tombs.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 1.
Death makes no conquest of this conqueror:
For now he lives in fame, though not in life.

Richard III. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 87.
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He lives in fame, that died in virtue's cause.
Titus Andronicus. Act I, Sc. 1. L. 390.

C'est un poids bien pesant qu'un nom trop tôt fameux.

What a heavy burden a name that has become too famous. VOLTAIRE—Henriade. III.

19 What rage for fame attends' both great and

small! Better be dn'd than mentioned not at all. JOHN WOLCOT (Peter Pindar)—To the Royal

Academicians. Lyric Odes for the Year 1783. Ode LX.

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With fame, in just proportion, envy grows.

YOUNGEpistle to Mr. Pope. Ep. I. L. 27. Men should press forward, in fame's glorious

chase; Nobles look backward, and so lose the race.

YOUNG- Love of Fame. Satire I. L. 129. Wouldst thou be famed? have those high acts

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in view,

Brave men would act though scandal would

YOUNG--Love of Fame. Satire VII. L. 175.

ensue.

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Fame is the perfume of heroic deeds.

SOCRATES. Sloth views the towers of fame with envious eyes, Desirous still, still impotent to rise. SHENSTONE-Moral Pieces. The Judgment of

Hercules. L. 436. No true and permanent Fame can be founded except in labors which promote the happiness of mankind. CHARLES SUMNER—Fame and Glory. An

Address before the Literary Societies of

Amherst College. Aug. 11, 1847. 10

Censure is the tax a man pays to the public for being eminent. SWIFTThoughts on Various Subjects.

Etiam sapientibus cupido gloriæ novissima exuitur.

The love of fame is the last weakness which even the wise resign. TACITUS-Annales. IV.

(See also MASSINGER) Modestiæ fama neque summis mortalibus spernenda est.

Modest fame is not to be despised by the highest characters. TACITUS-Annales. XV. 2.

Fame is the shade of immortality,
And in itself a shadow. Soon as caught,
Contemn'd; it shrinks to nothing in the grasp.

YOUNGNight Thoughts. Night VII. L. 363.

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FAMILIARITY
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Nimia familiaritas parit contemptum.

Familiarity breeds contempt.
THOMAS AQUINAS-Ad Joannem fratrem Mo-

nitio. SYRUS-Maxims. 640. Idea in Cic-
ERO-Pro Murena. Ch. IX. Livy. Bk.
XXXV. Ch. X. PLUTARCH, C. MAR. Ch.
XVI. LA FONTAINEFables IV. X.

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The whole earth is a sepulchre for famous men.

THUCYDIDES. 2. 43.

Quod crebro videt non miratur, etiamsi cur fiat nescit. Quod ante non vidit, id si evenerit, ostentum esse censet.

A man does not wonder at what he sees frequently, even though he be ignorant of the reason. If anything happens which he has not seen before, he calls it a prodigy. CICERODe Divinatione. II. 22.

27 I hold he loves me best that calls me Tom. THOMAS HEYWOOD-Hierarchie of the Blessed

Angells.

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FAMILY (See HOME)

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Tell me where is fancy bred,
Or in the heart or in the head?
How begot, how nourished?

Reply, reply.
It is engender'd in the eyes,
With gazing fed; and fancy dies
In the cradle where it lies.
Merchant of Venice. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 63.

So full of shapes is fancy, That it alone is high fantastical.

Twelfth Night. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 14. Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep; If it be thus to dream, still let me sleep! Twelfth Night. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 66.

We figure to ourselves The thing we like, and then we build it up As chance will have it, on the rock or sand: For Thought is tired of wandering o'er the world, And homebound Fancy runs her bark ashore. SIR HENRY TAYLOR-Philip Van Artevelde.

Pt. I. Act I. Sc. 5. 19 Fancy light from Fancy caught.

TENNYSON-In Memoriam. Pt. XXIII.

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Sad fancies do we then affect,
In luxury of disrespect
To our own prodigal excess
Of too familiar happiness.

WORDSWORTH-Ode to Lycoris.

FANCY (See also IMAGINATION) 4 Some things are of that nature as to make One's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache. BUNYAN-Pilgrim's Progress. The Author's

Way of Sending Forth his Second Part of

the Pilgrim. Pt. II. 5 While fancy, like the finger of a clock, Runs the great circuit, and is still at home. COWPERThe Task. Bk. IV.

L. 118,

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Ever let the Fancy roam,
Pleasure never is at home.

KEATSFancy.

7 The truant Fancy was a wanderer ever. LAMBFancy employed on Divine Subjects.

I. 1.

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Sentiment is intellectualized emotion, emotion precipitated, as it were, in pretty crystals by the fancy. LOWELL-Among My Books. Rousseau and

the Sentimentalists.

FAREWELL (See also PARTING) He turn'd him right and round about

Upon the Irish shore, And gae

his bridle reins a shake, With Adieu for evermore,

My dear, With Adieu for evermore. BURNS-It Was a' for our Rightfu' King. Used

and altered by Scott in Rokeby and Monastery.

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She's all my fancy painted her, She's lovely, she's divine.

WM. MEE-Alice Gray.

Farewell! a word that must be, and hath beenA sound which makes us linger;-yet-farewell!

BYRON—Childe Harold. Canto IV. St. 186.

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"Farewell!” For in that word—that fatal word-howe'er We promise—hope believe there breathes de

spair. BYRON—Corsair. Canto I. St. 15.

24 Fare thee well! and if for ever, Still for ever, fare thee well.

BYRON—Fare Thee Well.

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“Adieu,” she cries, and waved her lily hand. GAY--Sweet William's Farewell to Black-eyed

Susan.

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Woe to the youth whom Fancy gains,
Winning from Reason's hand the reins,
Pity and woe! for such a mind
Is soft, contemplative, and kind.
SCOTTRokeby. Canto I. St. 31.

Pacing through the forest, Chewing the food of sweet and bitter fancy.

As You Like It. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 101.

Friend, ahoy! Farewell! farewell!

Grief unto grief, joy unto joy,
Greeting and help the echoes tell

Faint, but eternal-Friend, ahoy!
HELEN HUNT JACKSON—Verses. Friend,

Ahoy!

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Many things happen between the cup and the lip. BURTON—Anatomy of Melancholy. Pt. II. Sec. II. Memb. 3.

(See also GREENE)

To curse the hopeless world they ever curs’d, Vaunting vile deeds, and vainest of the worst. EBENEZER ELLIOTT—The Village Patriarch.

Bk. IV. Pt. IV.

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2

On est, quand on veut, maître de son sort.

We are, when we will it, masters of our own fate. FERRIER—Adraste.

(See also HENLEY under SOUL)

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3

Things and actions are what they are, and the consequences of them will be what they will be; why then should we desire to be deceived? BISHOP BUTLER-Sermon VII. On the Char

acter of Balaam. Last Paragraph.
Success, the mark no mortal wit,
Or surest hand, can always hit:
For whatsoe'er we perpetrate,
We do but row, we're

steer'd by Fate,
Which in success oft disinherits,
For spurious causes, noblest merits.

BUTLERHudibras. Pt. I. Canto I. L. 879.

One common fate we both must prove;
You die with envy, I with love.

GAY-Fable. The Poet and Rose. L. 29.

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Du musst (herrschen und gewinnen,
Oder dienen und verlieren,
Leiden oder triumphiren),
Amboss oder Hammer sein.

Thou must (in commanding and winning, or serving and losing, suffering or triumphing) be either anvil or hammer. GOETHE-Grosscophta. II.

Here's a sigh to those who love me,

And a smile to those who hate;
And whatever sky's above me,

Here's a heart for every fate.
BYRON—To Thomas Moore. St. 2.

(See LONGFELLOW under ACTION)

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To bear is to conquer our fate.

CAMPBELL-On Visiting a Scene in Argyleshire.

Der Mensch erfährt, er sei auch wer er mag,
Ein letztes Glück und einen letzten Tag.

Man, be he who he may, experiences a last piece of good fortune and a last day. GOETHE-Sprüche in Reimen. III.

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Each curs'd his fate that thus their project

cross'd; How hard their lot who neither won nor lost.

GRAVES—An Incident in High Life.

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Le vin est versé, il faut le boire.

The wine is poured, you should drink it. Attributed to M. DE CHAROST. Spoken to

Louis XIV, at the siege of Douai, as the

king attempted to retire from the firing line. 7

Tolluntur in altum Ut lapsu graviore ruant.

They are raised on high that they may be dashed to pieces with a greater fall.

CLAUDIAN-In Rufinum. Bk. I. 22. Fate steals along with silent tread, Found oftenest in what least we dread; Frowns in the storm with angry brow, But in the sunshine strikes the blow.

COWPER-A Fable. Moral.

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'Tis Fate that flings the dice,

And as she flings
Of kings makes peasants,

And of peasants kings.
DRYDEN-Works. Vol. XV. P. 103. Ed.
1821.

Fate has carried me 'Mid the thick arrows: I will keep my standNot shrink and let the shaft pass by my breast To pierce another. GEORGE Eliot The Spanish Gypsy. Bk. III.

Stern fate and time Will have their victims; and the best die first, Leaving the bad still strong, though past their

prime,

Toil the lot of all, and bitter woe
The fate of many.
HOMERIliad. Bk. XXI. L. 646. BRY-

ANT's trans.
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Jove lifts the golden balances that show
The fates of mortal men, and things below.
HOMERIliad. Bk. XXII. L. 271. POPE's

trans.

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And not a man appears to tell their fate.
HOMER-Odyssey. Bk. X. L. 308. POPE's

trans..

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