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5 A fishing-rod was a stick with a hook at one end and a fool at the other. SAMUEL JoHNSON, according to HAZLITT–Essay on Egotism. The Plain Speaker. 6 Fly fishing is a very pleasant amusement; but angling or float fishing, I can only compare to a stick and a string, with a worm at one end and a fool at the other. Attributed to Johnsonby HAWKER—On Worm Fishing. (Not found in his works.) See Notes and Queries, Dec. 11, 1915. 7 Laligne, avec sa canne, est un long instrument, Dont le plus mince bout tient un petit reptile, Et dont l'autre est tenu par un grand imbecile. A French version of lines attributed to Johnson; claimed for GUYET, who lived about 100 years earlier.

s His angle-rod made of a sturdy oak; His line, a cable which in storms ne'er broke; His hook he baited with a §: tailAnd sat upon a rock, and bobb'd for whale. WILLIAM KING—Upon a Giant's Angling. (In CHALMERs's British Poets.) (See also DAVENANT)

g Down and back at day dawn, Tramp from lake to lake, Washing brain and heart clean Every step we take. . Leave to Robert Browning Beggars, fleas, and vines; Leave to mournful Ruskin Popish Apennines, Dirty stones of Venice, And his gas lamps seven, We've the stones of Snowdon And the lamps of heaven. CHARLEs ours and Memories, Aug., 1856. (Edited by MRs. KINGSLEY.) 10 In a bowl to sea went wise men three, On a brilliant night in June; They carried a net, and their hearts were set

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18 Angling may be said to be so like the mathematics that it can never be fully learnt. IzAAK, WALTON.—The Compleat Angler. Author's Preface. 19 As no man is born an artist, so no man is born an angler. IzAAK, WALTON.—The Compleat Angler. Author's Preface.

20 I shall stay him no longer than to wish * * * that if he be an honest angler, the east wind may never blow when he goes a fishing. IzAAK WALTON.—The Compleat Angler. Author's Preface. 21 Angling is somewhat like Poetry, men are to be born so. o www-to Compleat Angler. Pt. I.

22 Doubt not but angling will prove to be so pleasant, that it will prove to be, like virtue, a reward to itself. o: www-ro Compleat Angler. Pt. L

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