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1. Would give preceptial medicine to rage, Curae leves loguuntur, ingentes stupent. Fetter strong madness in a silken thread,

Light griefs are communicative, great ones stupefy. SENEcA—Hippolytus. 607. 2

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Charm ache, with air and agony with words.

M; Ado About Nothing. Act W. Sc. 1. L.

0.

17 Nor doth the general care
Take hold on me, for my particular grief
Is of so flood-gate and o'erbearing nature
That it engluts and swallows other sorrows
And it is still itself.

Othello. Act I. Sc. 3. L. 54.

18 When remedies are past, the By ...” worst, which

pended. Othello. Act I. Sc. 3. L. 202.

iefs are ended te on hopes de

19 Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadows, Which shows like grief itself, but is not so; For sorrow's eye, glazed with blinding tears, Divides one thing entire to many objects. Richard II. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 14. 20 You may my glories and my state depose, But not my griefs; still am I king of those. Richard II. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 192.

21 My grief lies all within; And these external manners of laments Are merely shadows to the unseen grief That swells with silence in the tortur'd soul.

Richard II. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 295.

22 Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast, Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest With more of thine.

Romeo and Juliet. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 193.

23 Some griefs show much of love; But much of grief shows still some want of wit. Romeo and Juliet. Act III. Sc. 5. L. 73.

24 My grief lies onward and my joy behind. Sonnet L. 25 Alas, r man! grief has so wrought on him, He takes false shadows for true su Ces. Titus Andronicus. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 79.

26 But I have

That honourable grief lodg'd here which burns

Worse than tears drown.
Winter's Tale. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 110.

27 What's gone and what's past help Should be past grief. Winter's Tale. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 223.

28 Winter is come and gone, But grief returns with the revolving year. SHELLEY-Adonais. St. 18.

29 Dark is the realm of grief: but human things Thooy not know of who cannot weep for them. SHELLEY-Otho. (A projected poem.)

30 “Oh, o quoth she, “great griefe will not be tould, And can more easily be thought than said.” SPENSER—Faerie Queene. Bk. I. Canto VII. St. 41. (See also LoNGFELLow)

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13 Arts and sciences are not cast in a mould, but are found and perfected by degrees, by often . polishing, as bears leisurely lick their cubs into shape. MonTAIGNE–Apology for Raimond Sebond. Bk. II. Ch. XII. (See also VERGIL) 14

“Oh! what a vile and abject thing is man unless he can erect himself above humanity.” Here is a bon mot and a useful desire, but equally absurd. For to make the handful bigger than the hand, the armful bigger than the arm, and to hope to stride further than the stretch of our legs, is impossible and monstrous. . . . He may lift himself if God lend him. His hand of special grace; he may lift himself . . . by means wholly celestial. It is for our Christian religion, and not for his Stoic virtue, to pretend to this divine and miraculous metamorphosis. MonTAIGNE–Essays. Bk. II. Ch. XII. (See also WoRDsworth) 15 Heu quotidie pejus! haec colonia retroversus crescit tanquam coda vituli. Alas! worse every day! this colony grows backward like the tail of a calf. PETRONIUs—Cena. 44. 16 Funo genere est; capite se totum tegit. e is of the race of the mushroom; he covers himself altogether with his head. PLAUTUS—Trinummus. IV. 2. 9. 17 Post id, frumenti quum alibi messis maxima'st Tribus tantis illi minus reddit, quam obseveris. Heu! istic oportet obseri mores malos, Si in obserendo possint interfieri. Besides that, when elsewhere the harvest of wheat is most abundant, there it comes up less by one-fourth than what you have sowed. ere, methinks, it were a proper place for men to sow their wild oats, where they would not spring up. PLAUTUs—Trinummus. IV. 4, 128.

18 Grows with his growth, and strengthens with his strength. Pope—Essay on Man. Ep. II. L. 136. 19 "Tis thus the mercury of man is fix’d, Strong grows the virtue with his nature mix’d. Pope—Essay on Man. Ep. II. L. 178. 20 Im engen Kreis verengert sich der Sinn. Es * der Menschmit seinen grössern Zwecen. In a narrow circle the mind contracts. Man grows with his expanded needs. SCHILLER—Prolog. I. 59.

21 Jock, when yehaenaething else to do, ye may be aye sticking in a tree; it will be growing, Jock, when ye're sleeping. SCOTT–The }. of Midlothian. Ch. VIII.

22 Gardener, for telling me these news of woe, Pray God the plants thou graft'st may never

grow. Richard II. Act III. Sc. 4. L. 100.

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