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22 There are three wicks you know to the lamp of a man's life: brain, blood, and breath. Press the brain a little, its light goes out, followed by both the others. Stop the heart a minute, and out go all three of the wicks. Choke the air out of the lungs, and presently the fluid ceases to supply the other centres of flame, and all is soon stagnation, cold, and darkness. Hol.MEs—Professor at the Breakfast Table. XI. 23 Orandum est ut sit mens sana in corpore sano. Our prayers should be for a sound mind in a healthy body. JUVENAL–Satires. X. 356.

24
Preserving the health by too strict a regimen

is a wearisome malady.
LA Rochefoucauld–Maxims. No. 285.

L. 35.

25

Health consists with Temperance alone. Pope—Essay on Man. Ep. IV. L. 81. 26

Pars sanitatis velle sanari fuit.
It is part of the cure to wish to be cured.
SENECA–Hippolytus, CCXLIX,

1. May be he is not well: 15 Infirmity doth still neglect all office He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. Whereto our health is bound. Mark. IV. 9. King Lear. Act II. Sc. 4. L. 107. 16 I was all ear, 2 And took in strains that might create a soul Ah! what avail the largest gifts of Heaven, Under the ribs of death.

When drooping health and spirits go amiss? How tasteless then whatever can be given!

Health is the vital principle of bliss, And exercise of health.

Too-cal, of Indolence. Canto II. St.

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1 - 15 No command of art, Better to have the poet's heart than brain, No toil, can help you hear; Feeling than song. Earth's *:::: falls clear GEORGE MAcDoNALD–Within and Without. But on the listening heart. Pt. III. Sc. 9. L. 30.

John WANCE CHENEy—The Listening Heart,

2 Some hearts are hidden, some have not a heart. CRABBE—The Borough. Letter XVII.

3 “There are strings,” said Mr. Tappertit, “. . . in the human heart that had better not be wibrated.” DICKENs—Barnaby Rudge. Ch. XXII. (See also DICKENs under SYMPATHY)

4
The heart asks pleasure first,
And then, excuse from pain;
And then, those little anodynes
That deaden suffering;

And then, to go to sleep;

And then, if it should be

The will of its Inquisitor,

The liberty to die.
EMILY DICKINsoN—Poems. IX. (Ed. 1891)

5
Meine Ruh isthin,
Mein Herz ist schwer.
My peace is gone, my heart is heavy.
GoETHE—Faust. I. 15.

6 Ganz unbefleckt geniesst sich nur das Herz. Only the heart without a stain knows perfect ease. GoFTHE—Iphigemia auf Tauris. IV. 4. 123.

7 Dochein gekränktes Herzerholt sich schwer.

A wounded heart can with difficulty be cured.

GoETHE–Torquato Tasso. IV. 4. 24.

8
There is an evening twilight of the heart,
When its wild passion-waves are lulled to rest.
REENE HALLEck—Twilight.

9 I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. Job. XXIX. 13.

10 Let not your heart be troubled. John. XIV. 1.

11 The head is always the dupe of the heart. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Marims. No. 105.

12 Wo das Herz reden darf braucht es keiner Worbereitung. When the heart dares to speak, it needs no preparation. LEssING—Mina von Barnhelm. W. 4.

13

For his heart was in his work, and the heart

Giveth grace unto every Art.
LoNGFELLow—The Building of the Ship. L.7.

14 Something the heart must have to cherish, Must love, and joy, and sorrow learn; Something with passion clasp, or perish, And in itself to ashes burn. LoNGFELLow—Hyperion. Bk. II. Introduction.

16
The heart is like an instrument whose strings
Steal nobler music from Life's many frets:
The golden threads are spun thro’Suffering's fire,
Wherewith the marriage-robes for heaven are
Woven:
And all the rarest hues of human life
Take radiance, and are rainbow'd out in tears.
GERALD MASSEY-Wedded Love.

17 Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. Matthew. VI. 21.

18 But the beating of my own heart Was all the sound I heard. RICHARD Monckton MILNEs (Lord Houghton)—The Brookside.

10 And when once the young heart of a maiden is stolen, The maiden herself will steal after it soon. MooRE—Ill Omens.

20
Zwei Kammern hat das Herz.
Drin wohnen,
Die Freude und der Schmerz.
Two chambers hath the heart.
There dwelling,
Live Joy and Pain apart.
HERMANN NEUMANN-Das Herz. Trans. by
T. W. H. Robinson. Found in Echoes
from Kottabos. Another trans. by ERNEST
RADFORD-Chambers Twain.

21
Yonkers that have hearts of oak at fourscore

yeares.
Old Meg of Herefordshire. (1609)
(See also CERVANTEs)

22 Oh, the heart is a free and a fetterless thing, A wave of the ocean, a bird on the };

JULIA PARDoE—The Captive Greek Girl.

23
The incense of the heart may rise.
PIERPONT—Every Place a Temple.
(See also Cotton under RESIGNATION)

24
The heart knoweth his own bitterness.
Proverbs. XIV. 10.

25 A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance. Proverbs. XV. 13.

26 He that is of a merry heart hath a continual feast. Proverbs. XV. 15.

27 A man's heart deviseth his way; but the Lord directeth his steps. Proverbs. XVI. 9.

28
He fashioneth their hearts alike.
Psalms. XXXIII. 15.

t 13 Never morning wore The heart is a small thing, but desireth great To evening, but some heart did break. matters. It is not sufficient for a kite's dinner, TENNYSoN–In Memoriam. Pt. VI. Same

yet the whole world is not sufficient for it. QUARLEs—Emblems. Bk. I. Hugo de Anima.

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While resignation gently slopes the way;
And, all his prospects brightening to the last,
His heaven commences ere the world be past.
GoLDSMITH-The Deserted Village. L. 110.
10
They had finished her own crown in glory, and
she couldn't stay away from the coronation.
GRAY-Enigmas of Life.
11
Eye hath not seen it, my gentle boy!
Earhath not heard its deep songs of joy;
Dreams cannot picture a world so fair—
Sorrow and death may not enter there;
Time doth not breathe on its fadeless bloom,
For beyond the clouds, and beyond the tomb,
It is there, it is there, my child!
FELICIA D. HEMANs—The Better Land.

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22 Cedit item retro, de terra quod fuit ante, In terras; et, quod missum est ex ætheris oreis, Id rursum caeli relatum templa receptant. What came from the earth returns back to the earth, and the spirit that was sent from heaven, again carried back, is received into the temple of heaven. LUCRETIUs—De Rerum Natura. II. 999.

23 Heaven to me's a fair blue stretch of sky, Earth's jest a dusty road.

MASEFIELD–Vagabond

24 Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven.

Matthew. VI. 20.

25 It were a journey like the path to heaven, To help you find them.

MILTON.—Comus. L. 302.

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