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For the living there is hope, for the dead there is none.

THEOCRITUSIdyl. IV. 42.

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Spes fovet, et fore cras semper ait melius.

Hope ever urges on, and tells us to-morrow will be better. TIBULLUSCarmina. II. 6. 20.

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Vestras spes uritis.

You burn your hopes.
VERGILÆneid. V. 68.

HORSE Then I cast loose my buff coat, each halter let fall, Shook off both my jack-boots, let go belt and all, Stood up in the stirrup, leaned, patted his ear, Called my Roland his pet name, my horse with

out peer; Clapped my hands, laughed and sang, any noise

bad or good, 'Til at length

into Aix Roland galloped and stood. ROBERT BROWNING 6How They Brought the

News from Ghent.
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Gamaun is a dainty steed,
Strong, black, and of a noble breed,
Full of fire, and full of bone,
With all his line of fathers known;
Fine his nose, his nostrils thin,
But blown abroad by the pride within;
His mane is like a river flowing,
And his eyes like embers glowing
In the darkness of the night,
And his pace as swift as light.

BARRY CORNWALLThe Blood Horse.

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Morgan!She ain't nothing else, and I've got

the papers to prove it. Sired by Chippewa Chief, and twelve hundred

dollars won't buy her. Briggs of Turlumne owned her. Did you know

Briggs of Turlumne?Busted hisself in White Pine and blew out his

brains down in Frisco? BRET HARTE—Chiquita.

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Is Man
A child of hope? Do generations press
On generations, without progress made?
Halts the individual, ere his hairs be gray,
Perforce?

WORDSWORTHThe Eccursion. Bk. V.
Hopes, what are they?-Beads of morning

Strung on slender blades of grass; Or a spider's

web adorning In a straight and treacherous pass.

WORDSWORTHHopes, What are They? Hope tells a flattering tale,

Delusive, vain and hollow.
Ah! let not hope prevail,

Lest disappointment follow.
Miss WROTHER-In the Universal Songster.
Vol. II. P. 86.

(See also Wolcot)

Like the driving of Jehu, the son of Nimshi: for he driveth furiously.

II Kings. IX. 20. Villain, a horse —Villain, I say, give me a horse

to fly, To swim the river, villain, and to fly. GEORGE PEELE—Battle of Alcazar. Act V.

L. 104. (1588-9)

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Steed threatens steed, in high and boastful

neighs, Piercing the night's dull ear.

Henry V. Chorus to Act IV. L. 10.

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An two men ride of a horse, one must ride behind.

Much Ado About Nothing. III. 5.

21 For young hot colts being rag'd, do rage the

more. Richard II. Act II. Sc. I. L. 70.

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Give me another horse: bind up my wounds.

Richard III. Act V. Sc. 3. L. 177.

Hope, like a cordial, innocent, though strong,
Man's heart, at once, inspirits, and serenes;
Nor makes him pay his wisdom for his joys.

YOUNGNight Thoughts. Night VII. L. 1,514

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Confiding, though confounded; hoping on,
Untaught by trial, unconvinced by proof,
And ever looking for the never-seen.

YOUNG——Night Thoughts. Night VIII. L. 116.

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If my best wines mislike thy taste,
And my best service win thy frown,
Then tarry not, I bid thee haste;
There's many another Inn in town.

ALDRICH Quits.
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There are hermit souls that live withdrawn

In the place of their self-content;
There are souls like stars that dwell apart,

In a fellowless firmament;
There are pioneer souls that blaze their paths

Where highways never ran,
But let me live by the side of the road,

And be a friend to man.
SAM WALTER Foss-House by the side of the

Road.
(See also HOMER, JEREMIAH, TAGORE)

Hospes nullus tam in amici hospitium diverti

potest, Quin ubi triduum continuum fuerit jam odiosus

siet.

No one can be so welcome a guest that he will not become an annoyance when he has stayed three continuous days in a friend's house. PLAUTUS—Miles Gloriosus. III. 3. 12.

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For I, who hold sage Homer's rule the best,
Welcome the coming, speed the going guest.
POPE-Satire II. Bk. II. L. 159.

(See also HOMER)
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Given to hospitality.

Romans. XII. 13.

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My master is of churlish disposition
And little recks to find the way to heaven
By doing deeds of hospitality.
As You Like It. Act II. Sc. 4. L. 80.

I am your host; With robbers' hands my hospitable favours You should not ruffle thus.

King Lear. Act III. Sc. 7. L. 39.

Let me live in my house by the side of the road,

Where the race of men go by; They are good, they are bad; they are weak, they

are strong, Wise, foolish, so am I; Then why should I sit in the scorner's seat,

Or huri the cynic's ban?
Let me live in my house by the side of the road,

And be a friend to man.
SAM WALTER Foss-House by the Side of the

Road.

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I charge thee, invite them all: let in the tide
Of knaves once more; my cook and I'll provide.

Timon of Athens. Act III. Sc. 4. L. 118.

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Ah me, why did they build my house by the road Every human heart is human. to the market town?

LONGFELLOW_Hiawatha. Introduction. L. 91. RABINDRANATH TAGORE-Gardener. 4. (See also Foss)

Laborin' man an' laborin' woman

Hev one glory an' one shame; The lintel low enough to keep out pomp and Ev’ythin' thet's done inhuman pride;

Injers all on 'em the same. The threshold high enough to turn deceit aside; LOWELLThe Biglow Papers. First Series. The doorband strong enough from robbers to de

No. 1. St. 10. fend; This door will open at a touch to welcome every friend.

It is good to be often reminded of the inconHENRY VAN DYKE—Inscription for a Friend's

sistency of human nature, and to learn to look

without wonder or disgust on the weaknesses House.

which are found in the strongest minds. A host in himself.

MACAULAY-Warren Hastings. WELLINGTON. Of LORD JOHN RUSSELL. Related by SAMUEL ROGERS. (1839) Para

For nothing human foreign was to him. phrase of HOMER's epithet of AJAX. See THOMSON—To the Memory of Lord Talbot. POPE's trans. of Iliad. III. 293.

Translation of "Humani nihil a me alienum

puto." HOUSE (See HOME, HOSPITALITY)

For the interesting and inspiring thing about

America, gentlemen, is that she asks nothing for HUMANITY (See also PHILANTHROPY) herself except what she has a right to ask for

humanity itself.

WOODROW WILSON—Speech, at the luncheon Love, hope, fear, faith—these make humanity; These are its sign and note and character.

of the Mayor of New York, May 17, 1915. ROBERT BROWNING- Paracelsus. Sc. 3.

Never to blend our pleasure or our pride An inadvertent step may crush the snail

With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels. That crawls at evening in the public path.

WORDSWORTHHart-leap Well. Pt. II.
But he that has humanity, forewarned,
Will turn aside and let the reptile live.

But hearing oftentimes
COWPER—Task. Bk. VI.

The still, sad music of humanity.

WORDSWORTH-Tintern Abbey.
W'en you see a man in woe,
Walk right up and say "hullo.”

HUMILITY
Say “hullo" and "how d'ye do,"
"How's the world a-usin' you?''

Lowliness is the base of every virtue,

And he who goes the lowest builds the safest. W'en you travel through the strange

BAILEY-Festus. Sc. Home.
Country t'other side the range,
Then the souls you've cheered will know

He saw a cottage with a double coach-house, Who you be, an' say "hullo.”

A cottage of gentility! SAM WALTER Foss—Hullo.

And the Devil did grin, for his darling sin 7

Is pride that apes humility. He held his seat; a friend to human race.

COLERIDGE-Devil's Waik. Original title, HOMERIliad. Bk. VI. L. 18. POPE's trans.

Devil's Thoughts. Written jointly by COLE

RIDGE and SOUTHEY. Respect us, human, and relieve us, poor.

(See also SOUTHEY under Devn) HOMER— Odyssey. Bk. IX. L. 338. POPE'S trans.

I am well aware that I am the 'umblest person going *

* let the other be where he may. Over the brink of it.

DICKENSDavid Copperfield. Vol. I. Ch. Picture it—think of it,

XVI.
Dissolute man.
Lave in it-drink of it

'I'mble we are, 'umble we have been, 'umble Then, if you can.

we shall ever be. HoonBridge of Sighs.

DICKENS-David Copperfield. Vol. I. Ch.

XVII.
Oh, God! that bread should be so dear,
Ánd flesh and blood so cheap!

Parvum parva decent.
HooD Song of a Shirt.

Humble things become the humble.

HORACE-Epistles. I. 7. 44.
For He, who gave this vast machine to roll,
Breathed Life in them, in us a Reasoning Soul; God hath sworn to lift on high
That kindred feelings might our state improve, Who sinks himself by true humility.
And mutual wants conduct to mutual love.

KEBLE~Miscellaneous Poems. At Hooker's JUVENAL—Satire XV. L. 203.

Tomb.

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There's the humour of it.
Merry Wives of Windsor. Act I. Sc. 1. (In-

serted by THEOBALD from the quarto.)

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I was not born for Courts or great affairs;
I pay my debts, believe, and say my pray'rs.
POPE-Prologue to Satires. L. 268.

Humility is to make a right estimate of one's self. It is no humility for a man to think less of himself than he ought, though it might rather puzzle him to do that. SPURGEONGleanings Among the Sheaves. Hu

mility. 8

The higher a man is in grace, the lower he will be in his own esteem. SPURGEON—Gleanings Among the Sheaves. The

Right Estimate.
Da locum melioribus.

Give place to your betters.
TERENCEPhormio. III. 2. 37.

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Enough is as good as a feast.
GEORGE CHAPMAN-Eastward Ho! Act III.

Sc. 2. Written by CHAPMAN, JONSON,
MARSTON.

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HUMMING-BIRD 10

Jewelled coryphée With quivering wings like shielding gauze out

spread. EDNAH PROCTOR CLARKE—Humming-Bird. Quick as a humming bird is my love, Dipping into the hearts of flowersShe darts so eagerly, swiftly, sweetly Dipping into the flowers of my heart.

JAMES OPPENHEIM-Quick as a Humming Bird. And the humming-bird that hung

Like a jewel up among The tilted honeysuckle horns

They mesmerized and swung In the palpitating air,

Drowsed with odors strange and rare, And, with whispered laughter, slipped away And left him hanging there. JAMES WHITCOMB RILEYThe South Wind

and the Sun.
A flash of harmless lightning,

A mist of rainbow dyes,
The burnished sunbeams brightening

From flower to flower he flies.
JOHN BANISTER TABB-Humming Bird.

Socratem audio dicentem, cibi condimentum esse famem, potionis sitim.

I hear Socrates saying that the best seasoning for food is hunger; for drink, thirst. CICERO-De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum. II.

28. (See also CERVANTES) 25 Oliver Twist has asked for more.

DICKENS-Oliver Twist. Ch. II.

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Græculus esuriens in cælum, jusseris, ibit.

Bid the hungry Greek go to heaven, he will go. JUVENAL-Satires. III. 78.

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God is thy law, thou mine.

MILTON- Paradise Lost. Bk. IV. L. 637.

17 The wife, where danger or dishonour lurks, Safest and seemliest by her husband stays, Who guards her, or with her the worst endures. MILTON-Paradise Lost. Bk. IX. L. 267.

And to thy husband's will Thine shall submit; he over thee shall rule. MILTON--Paradise Lost. Bk. X. L. 195.

With thee goes Thy husband, him to follow thou art bound; Where he abides, think there thy native soil.

MILTONParadise Lost. Bk. XI. L. 290. The stoic husband was the glorious thing. The man had courage, was a sage, 'tis true, And lov'd his country.

POPE-Epilogue to Rowe's Jane Shore. Well, if our author in the wife offends He has a husband that will make amends; He draws him gentle, tender, and forgiving, And sure such kind good creatures may be living.

POPE-Epilogue to Rowe's Jane Shore.

22 No worse a husband than the best of men.

Antony and Cleopatra. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 131. I will attend my husband, be his nurse, Diet his sickness, for it is my office.

Comedy of Errors. Act V. Sc. 1. L. 98.

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La ventre affamé n'point d'oreilles.

Hungry bellies have no ears.
RABELAIS-Pantagruel. Bk. III. Ch. XV.

(See also Cato)

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Nec rationem patitur, nec æquitate mitigatur nec ulla prece flectitur, populus esuriens.

A hungry people listens not to reason, nor cares for justice, nor is bent by any prayers. SENECA-De Brevitate Vitæ. XVIII.

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They said they were an-hungry; sigh'd forth

proverbs, That hunger broke stone walls, that dogs must

eat, That meat was made for mouths, that the gods

sent not
Corn for the rich men only: with these shreds
They vented their complainings.
Coriolanus. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 209.

Our stomachs
Will make what's homely savoury.
Cymbeline. Act III. Sc. 6. L. 32.

(See also CERVANTES)
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look.

Julius Cæsar. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 194.

That lord whose hand must take my plight shall

carry Half my love with him, half my care and duty.

King Lear. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 103.

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If I should marry him, I should marry twenty

husbands. Merchant of Venice. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 67.

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