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SoPHocLEs—Antigone. Johnson's ed. (1758) L. 632. Sophocles quotes it as a saying. The passage in Antigone is explained by Tricinius as “The gods lead to error him whom they intend to make miserable.” Quoted by ATHENAGORAs in Legat. P. 106. Oxon Ed. Found in a fragment of ÆscHYLUs preserved by PLUTARCH-De Audiend. Poel. P. 63. Oxon ed. See also CoNSTANTINUs MANAssEs. Fragments. Bk. VIII. L. 40. Ed. by BoissonADE. (1819) DUPORT's Gnomologia Homerica. P. 282. (1660) Oracula Sibylliana. Bk. VH L. 14. . SCHNEIDEWIN - Paraemiographorum Græcorum v.; "#"p. 444. SExTUs EMPIRICUs is given as the first writer to present the whole of the adage as cited by PLUTARCH. (“Con

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INSTINCT

14 Instinct is untaught ability.

BAIN–Senses and Intellect. (1855) P. 256.

15 Ein guter Mensch in seinem dunkeln Drange Ist sich des rechten Weges wohlbewusst.

A good man, through obscurest aspirations,

Has still an instinct of the one true way.

GoFTHE–Faust. Prolog im Himmel. Der

Herr. L. 88.

16

Nous n'écoutons d'instincts que ceux qui sont les nôtres.

Etne croyons le mal que quandilest venu.

'Tis thus we heed no instincts but our own,

Believe no evil, till the evil's done.

LA Fontaine—Fables. I. 8.

17
A fierce unrest seethes at the core

Of all existing things:
It was the eager wish to soar

That gove the gods their wings.

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There throbs through all the worlds that are
This heart-beat hot and strong,

And shaken systems, star by star,
Awake and glow in song.
DON MARQUIs—Unrest.

18 Great thoughts, great feelings, came to them, Like instincts, unawares. RICH. MonCKTON MILNEs—The Men of Old. 19 But honest instinct comes a volunteer; Surenever to o'er-shoot, but just to hit, While stilitoo wide or short in human wit. Pope—Essay on Man. Ep. III. L. 85. 20

How instinct varies in the grov'llingswine,
Compar'd, half-reasoning elephant, with thine!
"Twixt that and reason what a nice barrier!
Forever sep'rate, yet forever near!
Pope—Essay on Man. Ep. I. L. 221.
21
Instinct and reason how can we divide?
'Tis the fool's ignorance, and the pedant's pride.
Poison on the Vices of the World. Bk.

22

Instinct is a great matter; I was a coward on instinct.

Henry IV. Pt. I. Act II. Sc. 4. L. 299,

23 A few strong instincts and a few plain rules. WoRpsworth—Alas! What Boots the Long Laborious Quest?

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14 Glorious indeed is the world of God around us, but more glorious the world of God within us. There lies the Land of Song; there lies the poet's native land. LoNGFELLow—Hyperion. Bk. I. Ch. VIII.

15 A man is not a wall, whose stones are crushed . the road; or a pipe, whose fragments are thrown away at a street corner. The fragments of an intellect are always good. GEORGE SAND–Handsome Lawrence. Ch. II.

16 The march of intellect. SouTHEY-Sir Thos. More; or, Colloquies on the Progress and Prospects of Society. Vol. II. P. 361. 17

The intellectual power, through words and
things,
Went sounding on, a dim and perilous way!
WoRDsworth—Ezcursion. Bk. III.

18 Three sleepless nights I passed in sounding on, Through words and things, a dim and perilous way. WoRDsworth—Borderers. Written eighteen years before Excursion.

INTEMPERANCE (See also DRINKING, WINE)

19 Beware the deadly fumes of that insane elation Which rises from the cup of mad impiety, And go, get drunk with that divine intoxication Which is more sober far than all sobriety. WM. R. ALGER—Oriental Poetry. The Sober Drunkenness. 20 Man, being reasonable, must get drunk; The best of life is but intoxication: Glory, the grape, love, gold, in these are sunk The hopes of all men and of every nation; Without their sap, how branchless were the trunk Of life's strange tree, so fruitful on occasion: But to return,-Get very drunk; and when You * with headache, you shall see what then. BYRON-Don Juan. Canto II. St. 179.

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