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Or because we once thought so, and think we

still think so; Or because, having thought so, we think we will

think so. HENRY SIDGEWICK. Lines which came to him in his sleep. Referred to by DR. WILLIAM OSLERHarveian Oration, given in the South Place Magazine, Feb., 1907.

(See also BURTON)

Faciunt næ intelligendo, ut nihil intelligant.

By too much knowledge they bring it about that they know nothing. TERENCE—Andria. Prologue. XVII.

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And thou my minde aspire to higher things;
Grow rich in that which never taketh rust.
SIR PHILIP SIDNEYSonnet. Leave me, O

Love.

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Sweet food of sweetly uttered knowledge.

SiR PHILIP SIDNEY-Defence of Poesy.

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Namque inscitia est,
Adversum stimulum calces.

For it shows want of knowledge to kick
against the goad.
TERENCE— Phormio. I. 24. 27.
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Knowledge, in truth, is the great sun in the
firmament. Life and power are scattered with
all its beams.
DANIEL WEBSTER—Address. Delivered at

the Laying of the Corner-Stone of Bunker

Hill Monument, 1825.
Knowledge is the only fountain, both of the
love and the principles of human liberty.
DANIEL WEBSTER—Address Delivered on Bun-

ker Hill, June 17, 1843.

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As for me, all I know is that I know nothing. SOCRATESPlato. Phædrus. Sec. CCXXXV (See also CONFUCIUS, OWEN, STIRLING)

He who binds His soul to knowledge, steals the key of heaven. N. P. WILLISThe Scholar of Thibet Ben

Khorat. II.

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Oh, be wise, Thou! Instructed that true knowledge leads to love. WORDSWORTH-Lines left upon a Seat in a

Yew-tree.

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L
LABOR (See also WORK)

with the owl.) ARISTOPHANES—Aves. 301. Labour in vain; or coals to Newcastle.

DIOGENES LAERTIUS Lives of Eminent ANON. In a sermon to the people of Queen Philosophers. Plato. XXXII.' You are Hith. Advertised in the Daily Courant,

Oct. importing pepper into Hindostan. From the 6, 1709. Published in Paternoster Row,

Bustan of Sadi. London. "Coals to Newcastle,” or “from

(See also FULLER, HORACE) Newcastle," found in HEYWOOD If you 20 Know Not Me. Pt. II. (1606) GAUNT Qui laborat, orat. Bills of Mortality (1661) MIDDLETON— He who labours, prays. Phænit. Act I. Sc. 5. R. THORESBY Attr. to St. AUGUSTINE. Correspondence. Letter June 29, 1682. Owls (See also BERNARD, MULOCK, also TENNYSON to Athens. (Athenian coins were stamped

under PRAYER)

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kings, and with high hands makes them obey its laws. MOLIÈRE-Les Femmes Savantes. II. 6.

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LAMB Mary had a little lamb

Its fleece was white as snow,
And everywhere that Mary went

The lamb was sure to go.
Mrs. SARAH J. HALE-Mary's Little Lamb.

First pub. in her Poems for our Children,
1830. Claimed for John ROULSTON by Mary
Sawyer Tyler. Disproved by Mrs. Hale's
son, in Letter to Boston Transcript, April 10,
1889. Mrs. Hale definitely asserted her
claim to authorship before her death.

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Syllables govern the world.
JOHN SELDENTable Talk. Power.

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Fie, fie upon her! There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body.

Troilus and Cressida. Act IV. Sc. 5. L. 55.

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LANGUAGE (See also LINGUIST, SPEECH,

WORDS) Well languag'd Danyel. WILLIAM BROWNE-Britannia's Pastorals.

Bk. II. Song 2. L. 303. 3

Pedantry consists in the use of words unsuitable to the time, place, and company.

COLERIDGE-Biographia Literaria. Ch. X. And who in time knows whither we may vent The treasure of our tongue? To whit strange

shores This gain of our best glory shall be sent,

T'enrich unknowing nations with our stores? What worlds in th' yet unformed Occident May come refin'd with th' accents that are ours?

SAM. DANIEL—Musophilus. Last lines. Who climbs the grammar-tree, distinctly knows Where noun, and verb, and participle grows.

DRYDEN—Sixth Satire of Juvenal. L. 583. Language is fossil poetry.

EMERSONEssays. The Poet.

Language is a city to the building of which every human being brought a stone. EMERSONLetters and Social Aims. Quotation

and Originality. And don't confound the language of the nation With long-tailed words in osity and ation. J. HOOKHAM FRERE—King Arthur and his

Round Table. Introduction. St. 6. Language is the only instrument of science, and words are but the signs of ideas. SAMUEL JOHNSON—-Preface to his English Dic

tionary. L'accent du pays où l'on est né demeure dans l'esprit et dans le cæur comme dans le langage.

The accent of one's country dwells in the mind and in the heart as much as in the language. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Maximes. 342.

There was speech in their dumbness, language in their very gesture.

Winter's Tale. Act V. Sc. 2. L. 12.

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Ego sum rex Romanus, et supra grammaticam. I am the King of Rome, and above grammar. SIGISMUND. At the Council of Constance.

(1414) To a prelate who objected to his grammar.

(See also MOLIÈRE) Don Chaucer, well of English undefyled On Fame's eternall beadroll worthie to be fyled. SPENSERFaerie Queene. IV. 2. 32.

(See also WHITTIER) Language is the expression of ideas, and if the people of one country cannot preserve an identity of ideas they cannot retain an identity of language. Noah WEBSTER—Preface to Dictionary. Ed.

of 1828.

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Clamorous pauperism feasteth While honest Labor, pining, hideth his sharp ribs. MARTIN TUPPER— Of Discretion.

(See also BYRON) Labor omnia vincit improbus.

Stubborn labor conquers everything.
VERGIL— Georgics. Î. 145.

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Too long, that some may rest,
Tired millions toil unblest.
WILLIAM WATSON-New National Anthem.

(See also BYRON)

Labor is rest—from the sorrows that greet us;
Rest from all petty vexations that meet us,
Rest from sin-promptings that ever entreat us,

Rest from the world-sirens that hire us to ill. Work-and pure slumbers shall wait on thy'pil

low; Work—thou shalt ride over Care's coming bil

low; Lie not down wearied 'neath Woe's weeping wil

low! Work with

a stout heart and resolute will! FRANCES S. OSGOOD—To Labor is to Pray.

10 Dum vires annique sinunt, tolerate labores. Jam veniet tacito curva senecta pede.

While strength and years permit, endure labor; soon bent old age will come with silent foot. OVIDArs Amatoria. II. 669.

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Labor in this country is independent and proud. It has not to ask the patronage of capital, but capital solicits the aid of labor.

DANIEL WEBSTER—Speech. April, 1824.

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Ah, little recks the laborer,
How near his work is holding him to God,
The loving Laborer through space and time,

Walt WHITMAN—Song of the Exposition. I.

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And all labor without any play, boys,
Makes Jack a dull boy in the end.
H. A. PAGE-Vers de Société.

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Grex venalium.

The herd of hirelings. (A venal pack.) PLAUTUSCistellaria. IV. 2. 67.

Ah vitam perdidi operse nihil agendo.

Ah, my life is lost in laboriously doing nothing. Josiah WOODWARDFair Warnings to a Care

less World. P. 97. Ed. 1736, quoting

Merick Casaubon. (See also CowPER, GROTIUS; also HORACE under

IDLENESS)

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LAMB

kings, and with high hands makes them obey

its laws. Mary had a little lamb

MOLIÈRE-Les Femmes Savantes. II. 6. Its fleece was white as snow, And everywhere that Mary went

Une louange en grec est d'une merveilleuse The lamb was sure to go.

efficace à la tête d'un livre. MRS. SARAH J. HALE-Mary's Little Lamb. A laudation in Greek is of marvellous effi

First pub. in her Poems for our Children, cacy on the title-page of a book. 1830. Claimed for JOHN ROULSTON by Mary MOLIÈRE-Preface. Les Précieuses Ridicules. Sawyer Tyler. Disproved by Mrs. Hale's 14 son, in Letter to Boston Transcript, April 10, L'accent est l'âme du discours, il lui donne le 1889. Mrs. Hale definitely asserted her sentiment et la vérité. claim to authorship before her death.

Accent is the soul of a language; it gives the feeling and truth to it.

ROUSSEAUEmile. I.
LANGUAGE (See also LINGUIST, SPEECH,
WORDS)

Syllables govern the world.
Well languag'd Danyel.

JOHN SELDEN—Table Talk. Power.
WILLIAM BROWNE-Britannia's Pastorals.
Bk. II. Song 2. L. 303.

He has strangled 3

His language in his tears. Pedantry consists in the use of words unsuit Henry VIII, Act V. Sc. 1. L. 158. able to the time, place, and company. COLERIDGE–Biographia Literaria. Ch. X. Thou whoreson Zed! thou unnecessary letter!

King Lear. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 66. And who in time knows whither we may vent The treasure of our tongue? To what strange You taught me language; and my profit on't shores

Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you This gain of our best glory shall be sent, For learning me your language!

T'enrich unknowing nations with our stores? Tempest. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 363.
What worlds in th' yet unformed Occident
May come refin'd with th' accents that are ours?

Fie, fie upon her! SAM. DANIEL-Musophilus. Last lines. There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip,

Nay, her foot speaks; her wanton spirits look out Who climbs the grammar-tree, distinctly knows At every joint and motive of her body. Where noun, and verb, and participle grows. Troilus and Cressida. Act IV. Sc. 5. L. 55. DRYDEN-Sixth Satire of Juvenal. L. 583.

There was speech in their dumbness, language Language is fossil poetry.

in their very gesture. EMERSONEssays. The Poet.

Winter's Tale. Act V. Sc. 2. L. 12. 7

Language is a city to the building of which Ego sum rex Romanus, et supra grammaticam. every human being brought a stone.

I am the King of Rome, and above grammar. EMERSON—Letters and Social Aims. Quotation SIGISMUND. At the Council of Constance. and Originality.

(1414) To a prelate who objected to his

grammar. And don't confound the language of the nation

(See also MOLIÈRE) With long-tailed words in osity and ation. J. HOOKHAM FRERE-King Arthur and his

Don Chaucer, well of English undefyled Round Table. Introduction. St. 6.

On Fame's eternall beadroll worthie to be fyled.

SPENSER—Faerie Queene. IV. 2. 32. Language is the only instrument of science,

(See also WHITTIER) and words are but the signs of ideas.

Language is the expression of ideas, and if the SAMUEL JOHNSON-Preface to his English Dic people of one country cannot preserve an identionary.

tity of ideas they cannot retain an identity of

language. L'accent du pays où l'on est né demeure dans NOAH WEBSTER-Preface to Dictionary. Ed. l'esprit et dans le cœur comme dans le langage. of 1828.

The accent of one's country dwells in the mind and in the heart as much as in the lan From purest wells of English undefiled guage.

None deeper drank than he, the New World's LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Maximes. 342.

Child,

Who in the language of their farm field spoke Writ in the climate of heaven, in the language The wit and wisdom of New England folk. spoken by angels.

WHITTIER-James Russell Lowell. LONGFELLOWThe Children of the Lord's Supe

(See also SPENSER) per. L. 262.

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Oft on the dappled turf at ease
La grammaire, qui sait régenter jusqu'aux rois, I sit, and play with similes,
Et les fait, la main haute, obéir à ses lois. Loose type of things through all degrees.

Grammar, which knows how to lord it over WORDSWORTH-To the Daisy.

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LAPWING
Changed to a lapwing by th' avenging god,
He made the barren waste his lone abode,
And oft on soaring pinions hover'd o'er
The lofty palace then his own no more.

BEATTIE—Vergil. Pastoral 6.

2 The false lapwynge, full of trecherye.

CHAUCER-The Parlement of Fowles. L. 47.

3 Amid thy desert-walks the lapwing flies, And tires their echoes with unvaried cries.

GOLDSMITH-Deserted Village. L. 44.

To hear the lark begin his flight,
And singing startle the dull Night,
From his watch-tower in the skies,
Till the dappled dawn doth rise.

MILTON-L'Allegro. L. 41.
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And now the herald lark Left his ground-nest, high tow'ring to descry The morn's approach, and greet her with his song.

MILTONParadise Regained. Bk. II. L. 279.

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The bird that soars on highest wing,

Builds on the ground her lowly nest; And she that doth most sweetly sing,

Sings in the shade when all things rest: In lark and nightingale we see What honor hath humility.

T.IONTGOMERY-Humility.

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I said to the sky-poised Lark:
"Hark-hark!
Thy note is more loud ard free
Because there les safe for thee

A little nest on the ground.".
D. M. MULOCK-A Rhyme About Birds.

For look where Beatrice, like a lapwing, runs Close by the ground, to hear our conference. Much Ado About Nothing. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 25.

LARK The music soars within the little lark, And the lark soars. E. B. BROWNING-Aurora Leigh. Bk. III. L.

155. 6 Oh, stay, sweet warbling woodlark, stay, Nor quit for me the trembling spray, A hapless lover courts thy lay,

Thy soothing, fond complaining.

BURNS—Address to the Woodlark. The merry lark he soars on high,

No worldly thought o'ertakes him.
He sings aloud to the clear blue sky,

And the daylight that awakes him.
HARTLEY COLERIDGE—Song.

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No more the mounting larks, while Daphne sings, Shall, list’ning, in mid-air suspend their wings.

POPE—Pastorals. Winter. L. 53.

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The sunrise wakes the lark to sing.

CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTIBird Raptures.

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O happy skylark springing

Up to the broad, blue sky,
Too fearless in thy winging,
Too gladsome in thy singing,

Thou also soon shalt lie
Where no sweet notes are ringing.

CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI-Gone Forever. St. 2.

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Then my dial goes not true; I took this lark for

a bunting. All's Well That Ends Well-Act II. Sc. 5.

L. 5.

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The lark now leaves his watery nest,

And climbing, shakes his dewy wings.
He takes your window for the East

And to implore your light he sings.
SIR WILLIAM DAVENANT The Lark nou

Leaves his Watery Nest.
The pretty Lark, climbing the Welkin cleer,
Chaunts with a cheer, Heer peer-I neer my

Deer; Then stooping thence (seeming her fall to rew) Adieu (she saith) adieu, deer Deer, adieu. DU BARTAS–Weekes and Workes. Fifth Day.

10 Musical cherub, soar, singing, away!

Then, when the gloaming comes,

Low in the heather blooms
Sweet will thy welcome and bed of love be!

Emblem of happiness,

Blest is thy dwelling-place 0, to abide in the desert with thee!

HOGG-The Skylark.

11 Rise with the lark, and with the lark to bed.

HURDIS— The Village Curate. L. 276.

12 None but the lark so shrill and clear;. Now at heaven's gate she claps her wings, The morn not waking till she sings. LYLY-Alexander and Campaspe. Act V. Sc.

1. (See also CYMBELINE)

Hark! hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings,

And Phæbus 'gins arise,
His steeds to water at those springs

On chalic'd flowers that lies.
And winking Mary-buds begin

To ope their golden eyes;
With everything that pretty is,

My lady sweet, arise!
Cymbeline. Act II. Sc. 3. Song. L. 21.

(See also LYLY)

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