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19 Libraries are as the shrines where all the relics of the ancient saints, full of true virtue, and that without delusion or imposture, are preserved and reposed. BACON-Libraries. 20 That place that does contain My books, the best companions, is to me A glorious court, where hourly I converse With the old sages and philosophers; And sometimes, for variety, I confer With o and emperors, and weigh their counsels; Calling their victories, if unjustly }. Unto a strict account, and, in my fancy, Deface their ill-placed statues. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER—The Elder Brother. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 177.

21

A library is but the soul's burial-ground. It is the land of shadows.

HENRY WARD BEECHER—Star Papers. Ozford. Bodleian Library.

22

All round the room my silent servants wait,

M. friends in every season, bright and dim. ARRY CortNWALL-My Books.

23 Agreatlibrary contains the diary of the human race. DAwsoN–Address on Opening the Birmingham Free Library.

24 It is a vanity to persuade the world one hath much learning, by getting a great library. FULLER—The Holy and Profane States. Of Books. Maxim 1.

1 Every library should try to be complete on

one. if it were only the history of pin

heads. Holmes—Poet at the Breakfast Table. VIII.

2 The first thing naturally when one enters a scholar's study or library, is to look at his books. One gets a notion very speedily of his tastes and the range of his pursuits by a glance round his book-shelves. Holm Es—Poet at the Breakfast Table. VIII.

3 What a place to be in is an old library! It seems as though all the souls of all the writers that have bequeathed their labours to these Bodleians were reposing here as in some dormitory, or middle state. I do not want to handle, to profane the leaves, their winding-sheets. I could as soon dislodge a shade. I seem to inhale learning, walking amid their foliage; and the odor of their old moth-scented coverings is fragrant as the first bloom of those sciential apples which grew amid the happy orchard. LAMB–Essays of Elia. Oxford in the Vacation.

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LIFE

10

I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for

I shall not pass this way again. Author unknown. General proof lies with STEPHEN GRELLET as author. Not found in his writings. Same idea found in The S. . (Addison.) No. I. Vol. I. arch 1, 1710. CANoN JEPsoN positively claimed it for EMERSON, Attributed to EDwaRD CourTENAY, due to the resemblance of the Earl's epitaph. See Literary World,

March 15, 1905. Also to CARLYLE, MIss A. B. HAGEMAN, Rowland HILL, MARCUs AURELIUS.

(See also CHESTERFIELD)

11 If you will do some deed before you die, Remember not this caravan of death, But have belief that every little breath Will stay with you for an eternity. ABU'L ALA. (See also BACCHYLIDES, WAUVENARGUES)

12 Spesso ê da forte, Più che il morire, il vivere. Ofttimes the test of courage becomes rather to live than to die. ALFIERI-Oreste. IV. 2.

13

I know not if the dark or bright
Shall be my lot;

If that wherein my hopes delight
Be best or not.
HENRY M. ALFoRD–Life's Answer.

14

Everyman's life is a fairy-tale written by God's fingers.

HANs CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN–Preface to Works.

15 And by a prudent flight and cunning save A life which valour could not, from the grave. A better buckler I can soon regain, But who can get another life again? ARCHILochus—See PLUTARCH's Morals. Vol. I. Essay on the Laws, etc., of the Lacedemonians. 16 There is a cropping-time in the races of men, as in the fruits of the field; and sometimes, if the stock be good, there springs up for a time a succession of splendid men; and then comes a period of barrenness. ARISTOTLE—Rhetoric. II. 15. Par. III. Quoted by BISHOP FRASER. Sermon. Feb. 9, 1879.

17
We are the voices of the wandering wind,
Which moan for rest and rest can never find;
Lo! as the wind is so is mortal life,
A moan, a sigh, a sob, a storm, a strife.

Edwin ARNOLD-Light of Asia.

18 Life, which all creatures love and strive to keep Wonderful, dear and pleasant unto each, Even to the meanest; yea, a boon to all Where pity is, for pity makes the world Soft to the weak and noble for the strong.

Edwin ARNOLD-Light of Asia.

19 With aching hands and bleeding feet We dig and heap, lay stone on stone; We bear the burden and the heat Of the long day, and wish 'twere done. Not till the hours of light return All we have built do we discern. MATTHEw ARNOLD-Morality. St. 2.

20 Saw life steadily and saw it whole. MATTHEw ARNOLD-Sonnet to a Friend. (Said of Sophocles.)

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