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6 Majestic flower! How purely beautiful Thou art, as rising from thy bower of green, Those dark and glossy leaves so thick and full, Thou standest like a high-born forest queen Among thy maidens clustering round so fairI love to watch thy sculptured form unfolding, And look into thy depths, to §: A fairy cavern, and while thus beholding, And while thy breeze floats o'er thee, matchless flower, Ibreathe the perfume, delicate and strong, That comes like incense from thy petal-bower; My fancy roams those southern woods along, Beneath that glorious tree, where deep among The leaves thy large white flowercups hung! C. P. CRANCH-Poem to the Magnolia Grandiflora.

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15 Man only,–rash, refined, presumptuous Man— Starts from his rank, and mars Creation's plant Born the free heir of nature's wide domain, To art's strict limits bounds his narrow'd reign; Resigns his native rights for meaner things, For Faith and Fetters, Laws and Priests and

Poetry of the Anti-Jacobin. The Progress of

Man. L. 55.

16 Non è un si bello in tante altre persone, Natura il fece, epoi roppa la stampa. There never was such beauty in another man. Nature made him, and then broke the mould. ARIosto—Orlando Furioso. Canto X. St. 84. L'on peut dire sans hyperbole, que la nature, que la après l’avoir fait en cassa la moule. ANGELo CoNSTANTINI –La Vie de Scaramouche. L. 107. (Ed. 1690) 17 (See also BYRON, MontgomłRy)

Ye children of man! whose life is a span Protracted with sorrow from day to day, Naked and featherless, feeble and querulous, Sickly, calamitous creatures of clay. ARISTOPHANEs—Birds. Trans, by John HookHAM FRERE.

18 Let each man think himself an act of God. His mind a thought, his life a breath of God.

BAILEY—Festus. Proem. L. 162.

19

Man is the nobler growth our realms supply

And souls are ripened in our northern sky. ANNA LETITIA BARBAULD-The Invitation.

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1 14

Ad unguem factus homo. Before man made us citizens, great Nature
A man polished to the nail. made us men.
HoRACE—Satires. I. 5. 32. Lowell—The Capture of Fugitive Slaves Near

2 Man dwells apart, though not alone, He walks among his peers unread; The best of thoughts which he hath known For lack of listeners are not said. JEAN INGELow—Afternoon at a Parsonage. Afterthought.

: Man passes away; his name perishes from

record and recollection; his history is as a tale

that is told, and his very monument becomes a

ruin. WASHINGTON IRVING—The Sketch Book. Westminster A

4

Cease ye from man, whose breath is in his nostrils.

Isaiah. II. 22.

The only competition worthy a wise man is with himself. MRs. JAMESON.—Memoirs and Essays. Washington Allston. (See also HoRACE)

6 Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble. Job. XIV. 1.

7
Where soil is, men grow,

Whether to weeds or flowers.
KEATs—Endymion. Bk. II.

8 Though I’ve belted you and flayed you, By the livin' Gawd that made you, You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din. KIPLING—Gunga Din.

9 If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too; +

Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And—which is more—you'll be a man, my son! KIPLING—If. First and Last Lines.

10 Limited in his nature, infinite in his desires,

man is a fallen god who remembers the heavens. LAMARTINE–Second Meditations.

11 Il est plus aisé de connaitre l'homme en général que de connaitre un homme en particulier. It is easier to know mankind in general than man individually. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Marimes. 436.

12 As man; false man, smiling destructive man. NATHANIEL LEE-Theodosius. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 50. 13 A man of mark. LoNGFELLow—Tales of a Wayside Inn. Pt. I. The Musician's Tale. Saga of King Olaf. Pt. IX. St. 2.

Washington.

15 The hearts of men are their books; events are their tutors; great actions are their eloquence. MACAULAY—Essays. Conversation Touching the Great Civil War.

1 A man! A man! My kingdom for a man! MARSTON.—Scourge of Villainy. (See also Holland) 17 Hominem pagina nostra sapit. Our page (i.e. our book) reference to man. MARTIAL-Epigrams. Bk. X. 4. 10. 18 But in our Sanazarro 'tis not so, He being pure and tried gold; and any stamp Of grace, to make him current to the world, The duke is pleased to give him, will add honour To the great bestower; for he, though allow'd Companion to his master, still preserves His majesty in full lustre. MAssingER—Great Duke of Florence. Act I. Sc. 1. (See also WychERLY)

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