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14 Man is the measure of all things. PROTAGoRAs. Quoted as his philosophical principle.

15 Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels. Psalms. VIII. 5.

16 Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright. Psalms. XXXVII. 37.

17

Man is man's A, B, C. There's none that can

Read God aright, unless he first spell man. QUARLEs—Hieroglyptics of the Life of Man. 18 (See also PopF)

Quit yourselves like men. I Samuel. IV. 9.

19 A man after his own heart. I Samuel. XIII. 14.

20 Thou art the man. II Samuel. XII. 7.

21 Der Mensch ist, der lebendig fühlende, Derleichte Raub des mächt’gen Augenblicks. Man, living, feeling man is the easy prey of the powerful present. so-pe Jungfrau von Orleans. III.

22 “How poor a thing is man!” alas 'tis true, I'd half forgot it when I chanced on you. SchillER—The Moral Poet. 23 (See also DANIEL)

Men have died from time to time and worms have eaten them, but not for love. As You Like It. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 105.

24 He was a man, take him for all in all, Ishaiinot look upon his like again.

Hamlet. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 187.

25 What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And, yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? man delights not me; no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling, you seem to say so. Hamlet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 313. 26 I have thought some of Nature's journeymen had made men and not made them . they imitated humanity so abominably. Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 37.

27 Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart As I do thee. Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 76.

28 What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed?

Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 4. L. 33.

1. 16 Man's wretched state, This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth That floures so fresh at morne, and fades at

The tender leaves of hope; to-morrow blossoms,
And bears his blushing honours thick upon him:
The third day comes a frost, a killing frost,
And, when he thinks, good easy man, full surely
His greatness is a-ripening, nips his root,
And then he falls, as I do.
Henry VIII. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 352.

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evening late. SPENSER—Faerie Queene. Bk. III. Canto DX. St. 39. 17 Give us a man of God's own mould Born to marshall his fellow-men; One whose fame is not bought and sold At the stroke of a politician's pen. Give us the man of thousands ten, Fit to do as well as to plan; Give us a rallying-cry, and then Abraham Lincoln, give us a Man. E. C. STEDMAN–Give us a Man. (See also Holland)

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