Page images
PDF

For every bird is in lyric mood, 1. MAY And the wind will have its way. Hebe's here, May is here! CLINTON SCOLLARD–May Magic.

The air is fresh and sunny; And the miser-bees are busy

Hoarding golden honey.

T. B. ALDRICH-May.

2 As it fel] upon a day In the merry month of May, Sitting in a pleasant shade Which a grove of myrtles made. Roo BARNFIELD–Address to the Nightingate.

3 Spring's last-born darling, clear-eyed, sweet, Pauses a moment, with white twinkling feet, And golden locks in breezy play, Half teasing and half tender, to repeat Her song of “May.” SUsAN Coolidge—May.

4 But winter lingering chills the lap of May. Golds MITH-The Traveller. L. 172.

5

Sweet May hath come to love us,
Flowers, trees, their blossoms don;

And through the blue heavens above us
The very clouds move on.
HEINE–Book of Songs. New Spring. No. 5.

6 Omonth when they who love must love and wed. HELEN. HUNT JACKSON.—Verses. May.

7 O May, sweet-voiced one, going thus before, Forever June may pour her warm red wine Of life and passion,-sweeter days are thine! HELEN. HUNT JAckson—Verses. May.

s Oh! that we two were Maying Down the stream of the soft spring breeze; Like children with violets playing, In the shade of the whispering trees. CHARLEs KINGSLEy—Saint's Tragedy. Act II. Sc. 9.

9.

Ah! my heart is weary waiting,
Waiting for the May:

Waiting for the pleasant rambles

Where the fragrant hawthorn brambles,

With the woodbine alternating,
Scent the dewy way;

Ah! my heart is weary, waiting,
Waiting for the May.

DENIs FLORENCE McCARTHY—Summer Long1ngs.

10 Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flowery May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip, and the pale primrose. Hail, bounteous May, that doth inspire Mirth, and youth, and warm desire; Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing, Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and wish theelong.

MILTON.—Song. On May Morning.

11 In the under-wood and the over-wood There is murmur and trill this day,

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Dip a spoonful out MEDICINE d mind you don't get groggy, (See also DISEASE, HEALTH, SICKNESs) Pour it in the lake 1 Of Winnipissiogie.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

1. 15 I firmly believe that if the whole materia | Banished the doctor, and expell'd the friend. medica could be sunk to the bottom of the sea Pope—Moral Essays. Ep. III. L. 330. it would be all the better for mankind and all 16 the worse for the fishes. You tell your doctor, that y’are ill Holm Es—Lecture before the Harvard Medical | And what does he, but write a bill, School. Of which you need not read one letter, 2 The worse the scrawl, the dose the better. A pill that the present moment is daily bread For if you knew but what you take, to thousands. Though you recover, he must break. o JERRoLD–The Catspaw. Act I. PRior—Alma, Canto III. L. 97. . 1. 17 3 But, when the wit began to wheeze, Orandum est, utsit mens sana in corporesano. And wine had warm'd the politician, A sound mind in a sound body is a thing | Cur'd yesterday of my disease, to be prayed for. I died last night of my physician. JUVENAL–Satires. X. 356. PRIOR-The y Worse than the Disease.

(See also QUoTATIONsunder DISEASE)

4 You behold in me Only a travelling Physician; . One of the few who have a mission To cure incurable diseases, Orthose that are called so. low-crow,. The Golden Legend. Pt. I.

5 Physician, healthyself. }. TV 23. Quoted as a proverb

6
And in requital ope his leathern scrip,
And show me simples of a thousand names,
Telling their strange and vigorous faculties.
Milton—Comus. L. 626.

7 Adrian, the Emperor, exclaimed incessantly when lying, “That the crowd of physicians had killed him. MonTAIGNE—Essays, Bk. II. Ch. XXXVII.

8

How the Doctor's brow should smile,

Crown'd with wreaths of camomile.
MooRE—Wreaths for Ministers.

9. Dulcia nonferimus; succo renovamus amaro. We do not bear sweets; we are recruited by a bitter potion. OvID—Ars Amatoria. III. 583.

ld Medicus nihilaliudest quam animiconsolatio. Ajoin is nothing but a consoler of the ining.

PETRONIUs ARBITER—Satyricon.

11 I have heard that Tiberius used to say that that man was ridiculous, who after sixty years, appealed to a physician. PLUTARCH-De Sanitate tuenda. Wol. II. 12 (See also TACITUs)

So modern #. taught the art
By doctor's bills to play the doctor's part,
Bold in the practice of mistaken rules,
Prescribe, apply, and call their masters fools.
Pope—Essay on Criticism. L. 108.

13 Learn from the beasts the o of the field. Pope—Essay on Man. Ep. III. L. 174.

14

Who shall decide when doctors disagree,

And soundest casuists doubt, like you and me?
Pope—Moral Essays. Fp. III.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

10 But nothingismore estimable thanaphysician

who, having studied nature from his youth,

knows the properties of the human body, the

diseases which assail it, the remedies which will

benefit it, exercises his art with caution, and pays

equal attention to the rich and the poor. Voltaire—A Philosophical Dictionary. Phy

socians.

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »