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And the tear that we shed, though in secret it

rolls, Shall long keep his memory green in our souls. MOORE-Oh, Breathe not his Name.

(See also HAMLET)

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Though varying wishes, hopes, and fears,
Fever'd the progress of these years,
Yet now, days, weeks, and months but seem
The recollection of a dream.

SCOTT—Marmion. Introduction to Canto IV.
Still so gently o'er me stealing,
Mem'ry will bring back the feeling,
Spite of all my grief revealing
That I love thee,—that I dearly love thee still.

SCRIBE-Opera of La Sonnambula. Though yet of Hamlet, our dear brother's death, The memory be green. Hamlet. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 1.

(See also MOORE)

When time who steals our years away

Shall steal our pleasures too,
The mem'ry of the past will stay

And half our joys renew.
MOORE—Song. From Juvenile Poems.

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All to myself I think of you,
Think of the things we used to do,
Think of the things we used to say,
Think of each happy bygone day.
Sometimes I sigh, and sometimes I smile,
But I keep each olden, golden while
All to myself.

WILBUR D. NESBIT-AU to Myself.

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Die two months ago, and not forgotten yet? Then there's hope a great man's memory may outlive his life half a year.

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 137.

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At cum longa dies sedavit vulnera mentis,
Intempestive qui fovet illa novat.

When time has assuaged the wounds of the mind, he who unseasonably reminds us of them, opens them afresh. OVID Epistolæ Ex Ponto. IV. 11. 19.

Briefly thyself remember.

King Lear. Act IV. Sc. 6. L. 233.

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That memory, the warder of the brain, Shall be a fume.

Macbeth. Act I. Sc. 7. L. 65.

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Impensa monumenti supervacua est: memoria nostra durabit, si vita meruimus.

The erection of a monument is superfluous; the memory of us will last, if we have deserved it in our lives. PLINY the Younger-Epistles. LX. 19.

I cannot but remember such things were, That were most precious to me.

Macbeth. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 222.

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I remember, I remember

How my childhood fleeted by,The mirth of its December,

And the warmth of its July. PRAED—I Remember, I Remember. 10

If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth.

Psalms. CXXXVII. 6.

If a man do not erect in this age his own tomb ere he dies, he shall live no longer in monument than the bell rings, and the widow weeps.

* An hour in clamour and a quarter in rheum.

Much Ado About Nothing. Act V. Sc. 2. L. 76? I count myself in nothing else so happy As in a soul rememb’ring my good friends; And, as my fortune ripens with thy love, It shall be still thy true love's recompense.

Richard II. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 46.

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Tho' lost to sight, within this filial breast
Hendrick still lives in all his might confest.
W. RIDER, in the London Magazine, 1755. P.

589. (See also LINLEY)

How sharp the point of this remembrance is!

Tempest. Act V. Sc. 1. L. 137.

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And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.

Merchant of Venice. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 184.

Being all fashioned of the self-same dust,
Let us be merciful as well as just.
LONGFELLOW-Tales of a Wayside Inn. Pt. III.

The Student's Tale. Emma and Eginhard.
L. 177.

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The corn that makes the holy bread
By which the soul of man is fed,
The holy bread, the food unpriced,
Thy everlasting mercy, Christ.

MASEFIELD-Everlasting Mercy. St. 88.

We do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.

Merchant of Venice. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 198.

14 Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill.

Romeo and Juliet. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 202.

15 Who will not mercie unto others show, How can he mercie ever hope to have? SPENSER-Faerie Queene. Bk. VI. Canto I.

St. 42.
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Pulchrum est vitam donare minori.

It is noble to grant life to the vanquished.
STATIUS—Thebais. VI. 816.

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Sweet Mercy! to the gates of Heaven
This Minstrel lead, his sins forgiven;
The rueful conflict, the heart riven

With vain endeavour,
And memory of earth's bitter leaven

Effaced forever.
WORDSWORTH-Thoughts Suggested on

Banks of the Nith.

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'Tis vain to flee; till gentle Mercy show
Her better eye, the farther off we go,
The swing of Justice deals the mightier blow.
QUARLES-Emblems. Bk. III. Emblem XVI.

Think not the good,
The gentle deeds of mercy thou hast done,
Shall die forgotten all; the poor, the prisoner,
The fatherless, the friendless, and the widow,
Who daily owe the bounty of thy hand,
Shall cry to Heaven, and pull a blessing on thee.
NICHOLAS ROWEJane Shore, Act I. Sc. 2.

L. 173.
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Mortem misericors sæpe pro vita dabit.

Mercy often inflicts death.
SENECATroades. 329.

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You must not dare, for shame, to talk of mercy;
For your own reasons turn into your bosoms,
As dogs upon their masters, worrying you.

Henry V. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 81.

It sounds like stories from the land of spirits,
If any man obtain that which he merits,
Or any merit that which he obtains.

COLERIDGE-Complaint.

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Du même fonds dont on néglige un homme de mérite l'on sait encore admirer un sot.

The same principle leads us to neglect a man of merit that induces us to admire a fool. LA BRUYÈRE--Les Caractères. XII.

The quality of mercy is not strain'd
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes;
'Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown;
His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptred sway;
It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,
It is an attribute to God himself;

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Le monde récompense plus souvent les apparences de mérite que le mérite même.

The world rewards the appearance of merit oftener than merit itself. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Maximes. 166.

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Il y a du mérite sans élévation mais il n'y a point d'élévation sans quelque mérite.

There is merit without elevation, but there is no elevation without some merit. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Maximes. 401.

By merit raised To that bad eminence.

MILTON-Paradise Lost. Bk. II. L. 5.

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Plus on est de fous, plus on rit.

The more fools the more one laughs.
DANCOURT—Maison de Campagne. Sc. 11.

(See also GASCOIGNE) Some credit in being jolly.

DICKENS—Martin Chuzzlewit. Ch. V. A very merry, dancing, drinking, Laughing, quaffing, and unthinking time.

DRYDENThe Secular Masque. L. 40. And mo the merier is a Prouerbe eke.

GASCOIGNE-Works. Ed. by Hazlitt. I. 64. (The more the merrier.)

HEYWOOD-Proverbes. Pt. II. Ch. VII.
BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER—Scornful Lady.
I. 1. HENRY PARROTT-The Sea Voyage.

2. Given credit in BRYDGES-Censura Literaria. Vol. III. P. 337. KING JAMES I., according to the Westminster Gazette.

(See also DANCOURT) Ride si sapis.

Be merry if you are wise.
MARTIAL-Epigrams. II. 41. 1.

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The spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes.

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 73.

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The force of his own merit makes his way.
Henry VIII. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 64.

MERMAIDS
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O, train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note,
To drown me in thy sister's flood of tears.

Comedy of Errors. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 45. 9 Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid on a dolphin's back Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song: And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music. Midsummer Night's Dream. Act II. Sc. 1.

L. 149. 10

Who would be
A mermaid fair,
Singing alone,
Combing her hair
Under the sea,
In a golden curl
With a comb of pearl,

On a throne?
I would be a mermaid fair;
I would sing to myself the whole of the day;
With a comb of pearl I would comb my hair;
And still as I comb I would sing and say,
"Who is it loves me? who loves not me?"

TENNYSONThe Mermaid.

Mirth, admit me of thy crew,
To live with her, and live with thee,
In unreprov'd pleasures free.

MILTON-L'Allegro. L. 38.
A merry heart doeth good like a medicine.

Proverbs. XVII. 22.

22 Forward and frolic glee was there, The will to do, the soul to dare.

SCOTT-Lady of the Lake. Canto I. St. 21.

23 What should a man do but be merry?

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 131. 24

Hostess, clap to the doors; watch to-night, pray to-morrow. Gallants, lads, boys, hearts of gold, all the titles of good fellowship come to you! What, shall we be merry? Shall we have a play extempore? Henry IV. Pt. I. Act II. Sc. 4. L. 305.

As 'tis ever common That men are merriest when they are from home.

Henry V. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 271.
And, if you can be merry then, I'll say
A man may weep upon his wedding day.
Henry VIII. Prologue. L. 31.

But a merrier man,
Within the limit of becoming mirth,
I never spent an hour's talk withal.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 66.

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Slow sail'd the weary mariners and saw,
Betwixt the green brink and the running foam,
Sweet faces, rounded arms, and bosoms prest
To little harps of gold; and while they mused
Whispering to each other half in fear,
Shrill music reach'd them on the middle sea.

TENNYSONThe Sea Fairies.

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O wild and wondrous midnight,

There is a might in thee To make the charmed body

Almost like spirit be,
And give it some faint glimpses

Of immortality!
LOWELL-Midnight.

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'Tis midnight now. The bent and broken moon, Batter'd and black, as from a thousand battles, Hangs silent on the purple walls of Heaven.

JOAQUIN MILLER-Ina. Sc. 2.

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Soon as midnight brought on the dusky hour Friendliest to sleep and silence.

MILTONParadise Lost. Bk. V. L. 667.

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When every room Hath blaz'd with lights and brayed with min

strelsy. Timon of Athens. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 169. Jog on, jog on, the foot-path way,

And merrily hent the stile-a:
A merry heart goes all the day,

Your sad tires in a mile-a.
Winter's Tale. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 132.

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And let's be red with mirth.

Winter's Tale. Act IV. Sc. 4. L. 54.

13 The glad circle round them yield their souls To festive mirth, and wit that knows no gall. THOMSONThe Seasons. Summer. L. 403.

14 'Tis merry in hall Where beards wag all. TUSSER—Five Hundred Points of Good Hus

bandry. August's Abstract. ADAM DAVIE
Life of Alexander. (About 1312) In
WARTON'SHistory of English Poetry. Vol.
II. P. 10. Quoted by BEN JONSON-
Masque of Christmas.

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