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There are a good many real miseries in life that we cannot help smiling at, but they are the smiles that make wrinkles and not dimples.

HOLMESThe Poet at the Breakfast Table. III.

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This, this is misery! the last, the worst,
That man can feel.
HOMER-Iliad. Bk. XXII. L. 106. POPE's

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That to live by one man's will became the cause of all men's misery. RICHARD HOOKER—Ecclesiastical Polity. Bk.

I. Ch. X. 5. 4 Il ne se faut jamais moquer des misérables, Car qui peut s'assurer d'être toujours heureux?

We ought never to scoff at the wretched, for who can be sure of continued happiness? LA FONTAINE-Fables. V. 17.

MISFORTUNE It is the nature of mortals to kick a fallen man.

ÆSCHYLUS--Agamemnon. 884. (Adapted.) Calamity is man's true touch-stone. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHERFour Plays in

One. The Triumph of Honour. Sc. 1. L. 67. 18

Conscientia rectæ voluntatis maxima consolatio est rerum incommodarum.

The consciousness of good intention is the greatest solace of misfortunes. CICEROEpistles. V. 4.

19 He went like one that hath been stunn'd,

And is of sense forlorn:
A sadder and a wiser man,

He rose the morrow morn.
COLERIDGE Ancient Mariner. Pt. VII.

Last Stanza.

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Let us be of good cheer, however, remembering that the misfortunes hardest to bear are those which never come. LOWELL-Democracy and Addresses. Democ

тасу. .

Such a house broke! So noble a master fallen! All gone! and not One friend to take his fortune by the arm, And go along with him.

Timon of Athens. Act IV. Sc. 2. L. 5.

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Suave mari magno, turbantibus æquora ventis E terra magnum alterius spectare laborum.

It is pleasant, when the sea runs high, to view from land the great distress of another. LUCRETIUSDe Rerum Natura. II. 1.

(See also TERENCE) Rocks whereon greatest men have oftest wreck’d.

MILTONParadise Regained. Bk. II. L. 228. Quicumque amisit dignitatem pristinam Ignavis etiam jocus est in casu gravi.

Whoever has fallen from his former high estate is in his calamity the scorn even of the base. PHÆDRUSFables. I. 21. 1.

Misfortune had conquered her, how true it is, that sooner or later the most rebellious must bow beneath the same yoke. MADAME DE STAËL-Corinne. Bk. XVII.

Ch. II.

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Bonum est fugienda adspicere in alieno malo.

It is good to see in the misfortunes of others what we should avoid. SYRUS-Maxims.

19 I shall not let a sorrow die

Until I find the heart of it, Nor let a wordless joy go by

Until it talks to me.a bit; And the ache my body knows

Shall teach me more than to another,
I shall look deep at mire and rose

Until each one becomes my brother.
SARA TEASDALE-Servitors.

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Hoccin est credibile, aut memorabile,
Tanta vecordia innata cuiquam ut siet,
Ut malis gaudeant alienis, atque ex incommodis
Alterius, sua ut comparent commoda?

It is to be believed or told that there is such malice in men as to rejoice in misfortunes, and from another's woes to draw delight. TERENCE-Andria. IV. 1. 1.

(See also LUCRETIUS)

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Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.

Yield not to misfortunes, but advance all the more boldly against them. VERGIL—Æneid. VI. 95.

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So fallen! so lost! the light withdrawn

Whioh once he wore;
The glory from his gray hairs gone

For evermore!
WHITTIER-Ichabod.

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Nihil infelicius eo, cui nihil unquam evenit adversi, non licuit enim illi se experiri.

There is no one more unfortunate than the man who has never been unfortunate, for it has never been in his power to try himself. SENECA —De Providentia. III. 9 Calamitas virtutis occasio est. Calamity is virtue's opportunity. SENECA-De Providentia. IV. Nil est nec miserius nec stultius quam prætimere. Quæ ista dementia est, malum suum antecedere!

There is nothing so wretched or foolish as to anticipate misfortunes. What madness it is in your expecting evil before it arrives!

SENECA—Epistolæ Ad Lucilium. XCVIII. Quemcumque miserum videris, hominem scias.

When you see a man in distress, recognize him as a fellow man. SENECAHercules Furens. 463.

The worst is not So long as we can say “This is the worst." King Lear. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 29.

O, give me thy hand, One writ with me in sour misfortune's book.

Romeo and Ji liet. Act V. Sc. 3. L. 81.

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None think the great unhappy, but the great. YOUNGLove of Fame. Satire.

(See also ROWE)

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MOCCASIN FLOWER

Cypripedium With careless joy we thread the woodland ways

And reach her broad domain.
Thro' sense of strength and beauty, free as air.

We feel our savage kin,-
And thus alone with conscious meaning wear

The Indian's moccasin!
ELAINE GOODALE—Moccrsin Flower.

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11 MOCKING-BIRD

Take this at least, this last advice, my son: Then from the neighboring thicket the mocking- Keep a stiff rein, and move but gently on: bird, wildest of singers,

The coursers of themselves will run too fast, Swinging aloft on a willow spray that hung Your art must be to moderate their haste. o'er the water,

Ovm-Metamorphoses. Story of Phaeton. Bk. Shook from his little throat such floods of II. L. 147. ADDISON's trans.

delirious music, That the whole air and the woods and the Modus omnibus in rebus, soror, optimum est waves seemed silent to listen.

habitu; LONGFELLOW-Evangeline. Pt. II. St. 2. Nimia omnia nimium exhibent negotium homini

bus ex se. Winged mimic of the woods! thou motley fool! In everything the middle course is best: Who shall thy gay buffoonery describe?

all things in excess bring trouble to men. Thine ever-ready notes of ridicule

PLAUTUS-Pænulus. I. 2. 29. Pursue thy fellows still with jest and jibe: Wit, sophist, songster, Yorick of thy tribe; He knows to live who keeps the middle state, Thou sportive satirist of Nature's school;

And neither leans on this side nor on that.
To thee the palm of scoffing we ascribe,

POPE-Bk. II. Satire II. L. 61.
Arch-mocker and mad abbot of misrule!
ROBERT WILDE, D.D.-Sonnet. To the Mock Give me neither poverty nor riches.
ing-Bird.

Proverbs. XXX. 8.
MODERATION

Souhaitez donc mediocrité.
This only 'grant me, that my means may lie Wish then for mediocrity.
Too low for envy, for contempt too high.

RABELAISPantagruel. Bk. IV. Prologue. COWLEY-Essays in Prose and Verse. Of Myself. (Trans. of HORACE.)

Modica voluptas laxat animos et temperat.

Moderate pleasure relaxes the spirit, and Moderation is the silken string running moderates it. through the pearl-chain of all virtues.

SENECADe Ira. II. 20.
FULLER-Holy and Profane States. Bk. III.

Of Moderation. See also BISHOP HALIS Be moderate, be moderate.
Christian Moderation. Introduction. Why tell you me of moderation?

The grief is fine, full, perfect, that I taste,
Aus Mässigkeit entspringt ein reines Glück. And violenteth in a sense as strong

True happiness springs from moderation. As that which causeth it: how can I moderate it? GOETHE-Die Naturliche Tochter. II. 5. 79 Troilus and Cressida. Act IV. Sc. 4. L. 1. Auream quisquis mediocritatem deligit tutus

Bonarum rerum consuetudo pessima est. caret obsoleti sordibus tecti, caret invidenda

The too constant use even of good things sobrius aula.

is hurtful. Who loves the golden mean is safe from

SYRUS-Maxims. the poverty of a tenement, is free from the

Id arbitror envy of a palace.

Adprime in vita esse utile, Ut ne quid nimis. HORACE—Carmina. II. 10. 5.

Excess in nothing,—this I regard as a

principle of the highest value in life. Est modus in rebus, sunt certi denique fines TERENCE-Andria. I. 1. 33. Quos ultra citraque nequit consistere rectum.

There is a mean in all things; and, more There is a limit to enjoyment, though the over, certain limits on either side of which sources of wealth be boundless, right cannot be found.

And the choicest pleasures of life lie within HORACE-Satires. I. 1. 106.

the ring of moderation.

TUPPER-Proverbial Philosophy. Of ComThe moderation of fortunate people comes pensation. L. 15. from the calm which good fortune gives to their tempers.

Give us enough but with a sparing hand. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Maxims. No. 18.

WALLER-Reflections.

MODESTY
Le juste milieu.
The proper mean.

Maximum ornamentum amicitiæ tollit, qui Phrase used by Louis PHILIPPE in an ad ex ea tollit verecundiam.

dress to the deputies of Gaillac. First He takes the greatest ornament from occurs in a letter of VOLTAIRE's to COUNT friendship, who takes modesty from it. D'ARGENTAL, Nov. 29, 1765. Also in CICERODe Amicitia. XX. PASCAL-Pensées.

Modesty is that feeling by which honorable Medio tutissimus ibis.

shame acquires a valuable and lasting authority. Safety lies in the middle course.

CICERO-Rhetorical Invention. Bk. II. Sec. OVID—Metamorphoses. Bk. II. L. 136.

LVI.

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Modesty antedates clothes and will be resumed Not stepping o'er the bounds of modesty. when clothes are no more.

Romeo and Juliet. Act IV. Sc. 2. L. 27. Modesty died when clothes were born. Modesty died when false modesty was born.

Da locum melioribus. S. L. CLEMENS (Mark Twain)-Memoranda.

Give place to your betters. PAINE's Biography of Mark Twain. Vol. TERENCE-Phormio. III. 2. 37. Immodest words admit of no defence;

He saw her charming, but he saw not half For want of decency is want of sense.

The charms her downcast modesty conceal'd. WENTWORTH DILLON-Essay on Translated THOMSON-The Seasons. Autumn. L. 229. Verse. L. 113.

MONEY (See also GOLD, MAMMON) Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit. HENRY FIELDINGTom Thumb the Great. Act Up and down the City Road, I. Sc. 3. L. 8.

In and out the Eagle,

That's the way the money goesHer modest looks the cottage might adorn,

Pop goes the weasel! Sweet as the primrose peeps beneath the thorn. Popular street song in England in the late GOLDSMITH-The Deserted Village. L. 329.

Fifties, sung at the Grecian Theatre. At

tributed to W. R. MANDALE. Like the violet, which alone

Money makes the man.
Prospers in some happy shade,
My Castara lives unknown

ARISTODEMUS. See ALCÆUS-Fragment. MisTo no looser eye betrayed.

cel. Songs. HABINGTONCastara. (1634) In ELTON'S ed. P. 166.

L'argent est un bon serviteur, mais un méchant maître.

Money is a good servant but a bad master. Why, to hear Betsy Bobbet talk about wim

Quoted by Bacon. (French Proverb.) In min's throwin' their modesty away, you would

Menegiana. II. 296. 1695. think if they ever went to the political pole, they would have to take their dignity and modesty

Money is like muck, not good except it be spread. and throw 'em against the pole, and go without

Bacon-Of Sedition.
any all the rest of their lives.
MARIETTA HOLLEY-My Opinions and Betsy
Bobbet's.

The sinews of business (or state).
BION. In Life of Bion by DIOGENES LAERTIUS

Bk. IV. Ch. VII. Sec. 3.
Cui pudor et justitiæ soror incorrupta fides

(See also DEMOSTHENES) nudaque veritas quando ullum inveniet parem?

What can be found equal to modesty, un Penny wise, pound foolish. corrupt faith, the sister of justice, and undis BURTON-Anatomy of Melancholy. Democritus guised truth?

to the Reader. P. 35. (Ed. 1887) HORACE—Carmina. I. 24. 6.

Still amorous, and fond, and billing, Modesty is to merit, what shade is to figures Like Philip and Mary on a shilling. in a picture; it gives it strength and makes it BUTLER-Hudibras. Pt. III. Canto I. L. 687. stand out. LA BRUYÈREThe Characters or Manners of How beauteous are rouleaus! how charming chests the Present Age. Ch. II. Sec. 17.

Containing ingots, bags of dollars, coins

(Not of old victors, all whose heads and crests Adolescentem verecundum esse decet.

Weigh not the thin ore where their visage Modesty becomes a young man.

shines, PLAUTUS-Asinaria. V. 1. 8.

But) of fine unclipt gold, where dully rests
Some likeness, which the glittering cirque con-

fines, Wenn jemand bescheiden bleibt, nicht beim Of modern, reigning, sterling, stupid stamp;Lobe, sondern beim Tadel, dann ist er's.

Yes! ready money is Aladdin's lamp. When one remains modest, not after praise BYRONDon Juan. Canto XII. St. 12. but after blame, then is he really so. JEAN Paul RICHTERHesperus. 12.

Money, which is of very uncertain value, and

sometimes has no value at all and even less. Can, it be

CARLYLE--Frederick the Great. Bk. IV. Ch. That modesty may more betray our sense

III. Than woman's lightness? Having waste ground enough,

Make ducks and drakes with shillings. Shall we desire to raze the sanctuary

GEORGE CHAPMAN-Eastward Ho. Sc. 1. Act And pitch our evils there?

I. (Written by CHAPMAN, JONSON, MARSMeasure for Measure. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 167. TON.)

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I knew once a very covetous, sordid fellow who used to say, "Take care of the pence, for the pounds will take care of themselves.” CHESTERFIELD-Letters. Nov. 6, 1747; also

Feb. 5, 1750. Quoting LOWNDES. (See also LOWNDES; also CHESTERFIELD under

TIME)

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nummos.

Fight thou with shafts of silver, and o'ercome
When no force else can get the masterdome.

HERRICK—Money Gets the Mastery.

How widely its agencies vary, -
To save, to ruin, to curse, to bless,
As even its minted coins express,
Now stamp'd with the image of good Queen Bess,

And now of a Bloody Mary.
HOOD-Miss Kilmansegg. Her Moral.
Quærenda pecunia primum est; virtus post

Money is to be sought for first of all; virtue after wealth. HORACE-Epistles. I. 1. 53.

Rem facias rem, Recte si possis, si non, quocumque modo rem.

Money, make money; by honest means if you can; if not, by any means make money. HORACEEpistles. I. 1. 65.

(See also JONSON) Quo mihi fortunam, si non conceditur uti?

Of what use is a fortune to me, if I can not

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Money was made, not to command our will,
But all our lawful pleasures to fulfil.
Shame and woe to us, if we our wealth obey;
The horse doth with the horseman run away.
ABRAHAM COWLEY-Imitations. Tenth Epis-

tle of Horace. Bk. I. L. 75. Stamps God's own name upon a lie just made, To turn a penny in the way of trade.

COWPERTable Talk. L. 421.

6 The sinews of affairs are cut. Attributed to DEMOSTHENES by ÆSCHINES.

Adv. Ctesiphon.
(See also Bion; also CICERO under WAR)

use it?

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HORACEEpistles. I. 5. 12.
Et genus et formam regina pecunia donat.

All powerful money gives birth and beauty.

HORACE-Epistles. I. 6. 37. Licet superbus ambules pecuniæ, Fortuna non mutat genus.

Though you strut proud of your money, yet fortune has not changed your birth. HORACE-Epodi. IV. 5.

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The sweet simplicity of the three per cents. BENJ. DISRAELI. In the House of Commons, Feb. 19, 1850. Endymion. Ch. XCVI.

(See also ELDON) “The American nation in the Sixth Ward is a fine People,” he says. “They love th' eagle,” he says. “On the back iv a dollar.” F. P. DUNNE-Mr. Dooley in Peace and War.

Oratory on Politics.

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Wine maketh merry: but money answereth all things.

Ecclesiastes. X. 19.

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The almighty dollar, that great object of universal devotion throughout our land, seems to have no genuine devotees in these peculiar villages. WASHINGTON IRVING-Creole Village. In

Wolfert's Roost. Appeared in Knickerbocker
Mag. Nov., 1836.

(See also WOLCOT)
Whilst that for which all virtue now is sold,
And almost every vice, almighty gold.
BEN JONSON-Epistle to Elizabeth, Countess

of Rutland. 25 Get money; still get money, boy; No matter by what means. BEN JONSONEvery Man in His Humour. Act II. Sc. 3.

(See also HORACE, POPE)

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If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow some. FRANKLINPoor Richard's Almanac. Same

idea in HERBERT Jacula Prudentum.

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This bank-note world.

Fitz-GREENE HALLECK-Alnwick Castle.

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