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11 You shall not pile, with servile toil, Your monuments upon my breast, Nor yet within the common soil Lay down the wreck of power to rest, Where man can boast that he has trod On him that was “the scourge of God.”

Edward EveRETT–Alaric the Visigoth.

12 He made him a hut, wherein he did put The carcass of Robinson Crusoe. O poor Robinson Crusoe! so Foote—Mayor of Garratt. Act I. Sc. 1.

13 Tombs are the clothes of the dead. A grave is but a plain suit, and a rich monument is one embroidered. FULLER—The Holy and Profane States. Bk. III. Of Tombs. 14 Exegi monumentum aere perennius Regalique situ pyramidum altius, | Quod non imber edax, non Aquilo impotens Possit diruere aut innumerabilis Annorum series et fuga temporum. Non omnis moriar, multaque pars mei Vitabit Libitinam. I have reared a memorial more enduring than brass, and loftier than the regal structure of the pyramids, which neither the corroding shower nor the powerless north wind can destroy; no, not even unending years nor the flight of time itself. I shall not entirely die. The greater part of me shall escape oblivion. HoRACE—Carmina. III. 30. 1. (See also MooRE, WEBSTER, also SPENSER under GENIUs)

15 Incisa notis marmora publicis, Per quae spiritus et vita redit bonis Post mortem ducibus. Marble statues, engraved with public inscriptions, by which the life and soul return after death to noble leaders. HoRACE—Carmina. IV. 8.

16 Coelo tegitur quinon habet urnam. He is covered by the heavens who has no sepulchral urn. LUCANUs—Pharsalia. Bk. VII. 831. (See also BRowNE under GRAve) 17 Thou, in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a life-long monument. MILTON.—Epitaph. On Shakespeare.

18 For men use, if they have an evil tourne, to write it in marble; and whoso doth us a good tourne we will write it in duste. THos. MoRE—Richard III. (See also HoRACE) 19 Towers of silence. Robert X. MURPHY, according to SIR GEORGE BIRDwood, in a letter to the London Times, Aug. 8, 1905.

20 Soldats, du haut ces Pyramide quarantesia, les vous contemplent,

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