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The crimson Moon, uprising from the sea,
With large delight, foretells the harvest near.
LORD THURLOW_Select Poems. The Harvest

Moon.
Meet me by moonlight alone,

And then I will tell you a tale
Must be told by the moonlight alone,

In the grove at the end of the vale!
You must promise to come, for I said

I would show the night-flowers their queen. Nay, turn not away that sweet head, 'T is the loveliest ever

was seen. J. AUGUSTUS WADE—Meet Me by Moonlight.

Morality without religion is only a kind of dead reckoning, -an endeavor to find our place on a cloudy sea by measuring the distance we have run, but without any observation of the heavenly bodies.

LONGFELLOW-Kavanagh. Ch. XIII. 14

We know no spectacle so ridiculous as the British public in one of its periodical fits of morality. MACAULAY-On Moore's Life of Lord Byron.

(1830)

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And suddenly the moon withdraws

Her sickle from the lightening skies,

And to her sombre cavern flies, Wrapped in a veil of yellow gauze.

OSCAR WILDE-La Faite de la Lune.

I find the doctors and the sages
Have differ'd in all climes and ages.
And two in fifty scarce agree
On what is pure morality.

MOORE-Morality.

MORNING 16 Sacrament of morning. E. B. BROWNING—Sabbath at Sea St. 6.

Last Line.

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MORALITY Kant, as we all know, compared moral law to the starry heavens, and found them both sublime. On the naturalistic hypothesis we should rather compare it to the protective blotches on a beetle's back, and find them both ingenious.

ARTHUR J. BALFOURFoundations of Belief. 5

No mere man since the Fall, is able in this life perfectly to keep the Commandments.

Book of Common Prayer. Shorter Catechism.

6 Rough Johnson, the great moralist. BYRON-Don Juan. Canto XIII. St. 7.

(See also HAWTHORNE) “Tut, tut, child,” said the Duchess. "Everything's got a moral if only you can find it." LEWIS CARROLL-Alice in Wonderland. Ch.

VIII.

The summer morn is bright and fresh, the birds

are darting by As if they loved to breast the breeze that sweeps

the cool clear sky. BRYANT-Strange Lady. The morn is up again, the dewy morn, With breath all incense, and with cheek all bloom, Laughing the clouds away with playful scorn, And living as if earth contained no tomb,

— And glowing into day.

BYRON-Childe Harold. Canto III. St. 98. Slow buds the pink dawn like a rose

From out night's gray and cloudy sheath;
Softly and still it grows and grows,

Petal by petal, leaf by leaf.
SUSAN COOLIDGEThe Morning Comes Before

the Sun.

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Awake thee, my Lady-Love!

Wake thee, and rise!
The sun through the bower peeps

Into thine eyes.
GEORGE DARLEY-Sylvia; or, The May Queen.

Act IV. Sc. 1.

The Bearings of this observation lays in the application on it. DICKENS-Dombey and Son. Ch. XXIII. 9

The moral system of the universe is like a document written in alternate ciphers, which change from line to line. FROUDE—Short Studies on Great Subjects.

Calvinism. 10

Morality, when vigorously alive, sees farther than intellect, and provides unconsciously for intellectual difficulties. FROUDE-Short Studies on Great Subjects. Di

vus Cæsar.

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Dr. Johnson's morality was as English an article as a beefsteak. HAWTHORNEOur Old Home. Lichfield and

Uttoxeter. (See also BYRON)

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Turning the other cheek is a kind of moral jiu-jitsu. GERALD STANLEY LEE-Crowds. Bk. IV.

Ch. X.

In saffron-colored mantle from the tides
Of Ocean rose the Morning to bright light
To gods and men.
HOMER-Iliad. Bk. XIX. L. 1. BRYANT'S

trans.

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MOTHERHOOD

The bravest battle that ever was fought; Stabat mater, dolorosa

Shall I tell you where and when? Juxta crucem lacrymosa

On the maps of the world you will find it not; Que pendebat Filius.

It was fought by the mothers of men. At the cross, her station keeping,

JOAQUIN MILLERThe Bravest Battle. Mothers Stood the mournful mother, weeping,

of Men. Where He hung, the dying Lord. ANON. Trans. by DR. IRONS.

Her children arise up and call her blessed. 2

Proverbs. XXXI. 28. Alma mater.

14 Fostering mother.

They say man rules the universe, Applied by students to the university where That subject shore and main they have graduated.

Kneel down and bless the empery

Of his majestic reign; [Milton) calls the university “A stony-hearted But a sovereign, gentler, mightier, step-mother."

Man from his throne has hurled, AUGUSTINE BIRRELL-Obiter Dicta. Phrase For the hand that rocks the cradle

used also by DE QUINCEY--Confessions of Is the hand that rules the world. an Opium Eater. Pt. I. Referring to Oxford WILLIAM STEWART Ross (“Saladin"). Poem Street, London.

in Woman: Her Glory, her Shame, and her

God. Vol. II. P. 420. 1894. A mother is a mother still,

(See also WALLACE) The holiest thing alive. COLERIDGE—The Three Graves. St. 10..

So loving to my mother That he might not esteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly.
The mother of all living.

Hamlet. Act. I. Sc. 2. L. 140.
Genesis. III. 20.
There is none,

And all my mother came into mine eyes
In all this cold and hollow world, no ount And gave me up to tears.
Of deep, strong, deathless love, save that within Henry V. Act. IV. Sc. 6. L. 32.
A mother's heart.

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MRS. HEMANS-Siege of Valencia. Sc. Room And say to mothers what a holy charge
in a Palace of Valencia.

Is theirs-with what a kingly power their love

Might rule the fountains of the new-born mind. The mother said to her daughter, “Daughter, MRS. SIGOURNEYThe Mother of Washington. bid thy daughter tell her daughter that her L. 33. daughter's daughter hath a daughter.” GEORGE HAKEWILL-Apologie. Bk. III. Ch. Who ran to help me when I fell, V. Sec. 9.

And would some pretty story tell, Mater ait natæ die natæ filia natum

Or kiss the place to make it well? Ut moneat natæ plangere filiolam.

My mother. The mother says to her daughter: Daughter ANNE TAYLOR—My Mother. St. 6. bid thy daughter, to tell her daughter, that her daughter's daughter is crying.

The bearing and the training of a child See GRESWELL-Account of Runcorn. P. 34. Is woman's wisdom.

Another trans.: Rise up daughter, and go to TENNYSON—Princess. Canto V. L. 456. thy daughter, For her daughter's daughter

Happy he hath a daughter. Another old form in WILLETS'

With such a mother! faith in womankind Hesapla, in Leviticum. Ch. XXVI. 9.

Beats with his blood, and trust in all things high

Comes easy to him, and though he trip and fall, I arose a mother in Israel.

He shall not blind his soul with clay. Judges. V. 7.

TENNYSON-Princess. Canto VII. L. 308.

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If I were hanged on the highest hill,

Mother is the name for God in the lips and Mother o’mine, O mother o’mine!

hearts of children. I know whose love would follow me still,

THACKERAY-Vanity Fair. Vol. II. Ch. XII. Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine! KIPLING-Mother O' Mine.

They say that man is mighty, 10

He governs land and sea, There was a place in childhood that I remember He wields a mighty scepter well,

O'er lesser powers that be; And there a voice of sweetest tone bright fairy But a mightier power and stronger tales did tell.

Man from his throne has hurled, SAMUEL LOVER—My Mother Dear.

For the hand that rocks the cradle

Is the hand that rules the world.
A woman's love

WM. Ross WALLACE-What Rules the World. Is mighty, but a mother's heart is weak,

Written about 1865-6. And by its weakness overcomes.

(See also Ross, also J. A. WALLACE under LOWELL-Legend of Brittany. Pt. II. St. 43.

PRAYER)

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MOTHERHOOD

The bravest battle that ever was fought; Stabat mater, dolorosa

Shall I tell you where and when? Juxta crucem lacrymosa

On the maps of the world you will find it not; Que pendebat Filius.

It was fought by the mothers of men. At the cross, her station keeping,

JOAQUIN MILLERThe Bravest Battle. Mothers Stood the mournful mother, weeping,

of Men. Where He hung, the dying Lord. ANON. Trans. by DR. IRONS.

Her children arise up and call her blessed. 2

Proverbs. XXXI. 28.
Alma mater.
Fostering mother.

They say man rules the universe, Applied by students to the university where That subject shore and main they have graduated.

Kneel down and bless the empery

Of his majestic reign; Milton) calls the university "A stony-hearted But a sovereign, gentler, mightier, step-mother."

Man from his throne has hurled, AUGUSTINE BIRRELL-Obiter Dicta. Phrase For the hand that rocks the cradle

used also by DE QUINCEY-Confessions of Is the hand that rules the world. an Opium Eater. Pt. I. Referring to Oxford WILLIAM STEWART Ross (“Saladin"). Poem Street, London.

in Woman: Her Glory, her Shame, and her

God. Vol. II. P. 420. 1894. A mother is a mother still,

(See also WALLACE) The holiest thing alive. COLERIDGEThe Three Graves. St. 10. .

So loving to my mother That he might not esteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly.
The mother of all living.

Hamlet. Act. I. Sc. 2. L. 140.
Genesis. III. 20.
There is none,

And all my mother came into mine eyes
In all this cold and hollow world, no fount And gave me up to tears.
Of deep, strong, deathless love, save that within Henry V. Act. IV. Sc. 6. L. 32.
A mother's heart.
MRS. HEMANS-Siege of Valencia. Sc. Room And say to mothers what a holy charge
in a Palace of Valencia.

Is theirs-with what a kingly power their love 7

Might rule the fountains of the new-born mind. The mother said to her daughter, "Daughter, MRS. SIGOURNEYThe Mother of Washington. bid thy daughter tell her daughter that her L. 33. daughter's daughter hath a daughter." GEORGE HAKEWILL-Apologie. Bk. III. Ch. Who ran to help me when I fell, V. Sec. 9.

And would some pretty story tell, Mater ait natæ die natæ filia natum

Or kiss the place to make it well? Ut moneat natæ plangere filiolam.

My mother. The mother says to her daughter: Daughter ANNE TAYLOR—My Mother. St. 6. bid thy daughter, to tell her daughter, that her daughter's daughter is crying.

The bearing and the training of a child See GRESWELL-Account of Runcorn. P. 34. Is woman's wisdom.

Another trans.: Rise up daughter, and go to TENNYSON—Princess. Canto V. L. 456. thy daughter, For her daughter's daughter hath a daughter. Another old form in WILLETS' With such a mother! faith in womankind

Happy he Hexapla, in Leviticum. Ch. XXVI. 9. .

Beats with his blood, and trust in all things high 8

Comes easy to him, and though he trip and fall, I arose a mother in Israel.

He shall not blind his soul with clay. Judges. V. 7.

TENNYSON-Princess. Canto VII. L. 308. If I were hanged on the highest hill,

Mother is the name for God in the lips and Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine!

hearts of children. I know whose love would follow me still,

THACKERAY_Vanity Fair. Vol. II. Ch. XII. Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine! KIPLING—Mother O' Mine.

They say that man is mighty, 10

He governs land and sea, There was a place in childhood that I remember He wields a mighty scepter well,

O'er lesser powers that be; And there a voice of sweetest tone bright fairy But a mightier power and stronger tales did tell.

Man from his throne has hurled, SAMUEL LOVER-My Mother Dear.

For the hand that rocks the cradle

Is the hand that rules the world. 11

A woman's love Wm. Ross WALLACE-What Rules the World. Is mighty, but a mother's heart is weak,

Written about 1865-6. And by its weakness overcomes.

(See also Ross, also J. A. WALLACE under LOWELL–Legend of Brittany. Pt. II. St. 43.

PRAYER)

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MOUTH

for Magistrates. (1587) MALONE suggests

that the Latin words appeared in the old Some asked me where the rubies grew,

Latin play by RICHARD EEDES-Epilogus And nothing I did say,

Cæsaris Interfecti, given at Christ Church But with my finger pointed to

Oxford. (1582) The lips of Julia. HERRICKThe Rock of Rubies, and the Quarrie Blood, though it sleep a time, yet never dies. of Pearls.

The gods on murtherers fix revengeful eyes. 2

GEO. CHAPMANThe Widow's Tears. Act V. Lips are no part of the head, only made for

Sc. IV. a double-leaf door for the mouth. LYLY–Midas.

Mordre wol out, that see we day by day. 3

CHAUCER— Canterbury Tales. The Nonnes Divers philosophers hold that the lips is parcel Preestes Tale. L. 15,058. of the mouth.

12 Merry Wives of Windsor. Act I. Sc. 1. Theobald's reading is “mind.” Pope changed

Murder may pass unpunish'd for a time, "mouth" to "mind.”

But tardy justice will o'ertake the crime.

DRYDENThe Cock and the Fox. L. 285. Her lips were red, and one was thin, Compared to that was next her chin,

Murder, like talent, seems occasionally to ru (Some bee had stung it newly).

in families. SUCKLINGA Ballad Upon a Wedding. St. 11.

GEORGE HENRY LEWESPhysiology of Com

mon Life. Ch. XII. With that she dasht her on the lippes, So dyed double red;

Absolutism tempered by assassination. Hard was the heart that gave the blow,

COUNT MÜNSTER, Hanoverian envoy at St. Soft were those lippes that bled.

Petersburg, writing of the Russian ConstiWILLIAM WARNER-Albion's England. Bk.

tution. VIII. Ch. XLI. St. 53.

Neque enim lex est æquior ulla, As a pomegranate, cut in twain,

Quam necis artifices arte perire sua. White-seeded is her crimson mouth.

Nor is there any law more just, than that he OSCAR WILDE—La Bella Donna della Mia who has plotted death shall perish by his own Mente.

plot.

OVID-Ars Amatoria. I. 655.
MULBERRY TREE
Morus

One murder made a villain, 7

Millions a hero. Princes were privileg'd O, the mulberry-tree is of trees the queen! To kill, and numbers sanctified the crime. Bare long after the rest are green;

Ah! why will kings forget that they are men, But as time steals onwards, while none perceives And men that they are brethren? Slowly she clothes herself with leaves

BISHOP PORTEUS—Death. L. 154.
Hides her fruit under them, hard to find.

(See also YOUNG)
But by and by, when the flowers grow few Murder most foul, as in the best it is;
And the fruits are dwindling and small to view But this most foul, strange and unnatural.
Out she comes in her matron grace

Hamlet. Act I. Sc. 5. L. 27.
With the purple myriads of her race;
Full of plenty from root to crown,
Showering plenty her feet adown.

For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak While far over head hang gorgeously

With most miraculous organ.
Large luscious berries of sanguine dye,

Hamlet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 622.
For the best grows highest, always highest,
Upon the mulberry-tree.

He took my father grossly, full of bread;
D. M. MULOCK-The Mulberry-Tree.

With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May;
And how his audit stands who knows save

heaven?
MURDER
8

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 80. Carcasses bleed at the sight of the murderer.

20 BURTON—Anatomy of Melancholy. Pt. I. Sec. I. Memb. II. Subsec. V.

No place, indeed, should murder sanctuarize.

Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 7. L. 128.
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Et tu, Brute fili.
You also, O son Brutus.

0, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, CÆSAR. Words on being stabbed by Brutus, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!

according to SUETONIUS. Quoted as "Et tu Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
Brutus" and "Tu quoque Brute.True That ever lived in the tide of times.
Tragedy of Richarde, Duke of York. (1600) Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood
Also found in S. NICHOLSON's Acolastus his Over thy wounds now do I prophesy.
Afterwitte. (1600) Cæsar's Legend, in Mirror Julius Cæsar. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 254.

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