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Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will

rather The multitudinous seas incardine, Making the green one red.

Macbeth. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 60.

2 Blood hath been shed ere now i' the olden time, Ere humane statute purg'd the gentle weal; Ay, and since too, murders have been perform’d Too terrible for the ear: the time has been, That, when the brains were out, the man would

die, And there an end; but now they rise again, With twenty mortal murders on their crowns, And push us from our stools: this is more strange Than such a murder is.

Macbeth. Act III. Sc. 4. L. 76. 3

The great King of kings Hath in the table of his law commanded That thou shalt do no murder:and wilt thou, then, Spurn at his edict and fulfill a man's?

Richard III. Act I, Sc. 4. L. 200. E un incidente del mestiere.

It is one of the incidents of the profession.
UMBERTO I, of Italy, after escaping death.

Assassination is the perquisite of kings.
Ascribed to him by other authorities.

(Quoted "métier" erroneously.) Cast not the clouded gem away, Quench not the dim but living ray,

My brother man, Beware!
With that deep voice which from the skies
Forbade the Patriarch's sacrifice.

God's angel, cries, Forbear!

WHITTIER-Human Sacrifice. Pt. VII.
One to destroy is murder by the law,
And gibbets keep the lifted hand in awe;
To murder thousands takes a specious name,
War's glorious art, and gives immortal fame.
YOUNG-Love of Fame. Satire VII. L. 55.

(See also PORTEUS) Killing no murder. Title of a tract in Harleian Miscellany, as

cribed to COL. SILAS TITUS, recommending the murder of CROMWELL.

God is its author, and not man; he laid
The key-note of all harmonies; he planned
All perfect combinations, and he made
Us so that we could hear and understand.

J. G. BRAINARD-Music.

17 The rustle of the leaves in summer's hush When wandering breezes touch them, and the

sigh That filters through the forest, or the gush That swells and sinks amid the branches high,

'Tis all the music of the wind, and we Let fancy float on this æolian breath.

J. G. BRAINARD-Music.

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"Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast," And therefore proper at a sheriff's feast. JAMES BRAMSTON-Man of Taste. First line

quoted from PRIOR. (See also BAMPFYLDE, CONGREVE, PRIOR) And sure there is music even in the beauty, and the silent note which Cupid strikes, far sweeter than the sound of an instrument; for there is music wherever there is harmony, order, or proportion; and thus far we may maintain the music of the spheres. SIR THOMAS BROWNE-Religio Medici. Pt.

II. Sec. IX. Use of the phrase "Music of the Spheres” given by BISHOP MARTIN FOTHERBY-Athconastrix. P. 315. (Ed. 1622) Said by BISHOP JOHN WILKINS

Discovery of a New World. I. 42. (Ed. 1694) (See also BUTLER, BYRON, COWLEY, JOB, MIL

TON, MONTAIGNE, MOORE) Yet half the beast is the great god Pan,

To laugh, as he sits by the river,
Making a poet out of a man.
The true gods sigh for the cost and the pain-
For the reed that grows never more again

As a reed with the reeds of the river.
E. B. BROWNING-A Musical Instrument.

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MUSIC Music religious heat inspires,

It wakes the soul, and lifts it high, And wings it with sublime desires,

And fits it to bespeak the Deity.

ADDISON-A Song for St. Cecilia's Day. St. 4. Music exalts each joy, allays each grief, Expels diseases, softens every pain, Subdues the rage of poison, and the plague. JOHN ARMSTRONG--Art of Preserving Health.

Bk. IV. L. 512. 10 That rich celestial music thrilled the air From hosts on hosts of shining ones, who thronged Eastward and westward, making bright the night. EDWIN ARNOLD--Light of Asia. Bk. IV. L.

418.

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Her voice, the music of the spheres,
So loud, it deafens mortals' ears;
As wise philosophers have thought,
And that's the cause we hear it not.
BUTLER-Hudibras. Pt. II. Canto I. L. 617.

(See also BROWNE)

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Sc. IV.

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MOUTH

for Magistrates. (1587) MALONE suggests

that the Latin words appeared in the old Some asked me where the rubies grew,

Latin play by RICHARD EEDES-Epilogus And nothing I did say,

Cæsaris Interfecti, given at Christ Church But with my finger pointed to

Oxford. (1582)
The lips of Julia.
HERRICKThe Rock of Rubies, and the Quarrie

Blood, though it sleep a time, yet never dies. of Pearls.

The gods on murtherers fix revengeful eyes.

GEO. CHAPMANThe Widow's Tears. Act V. Lips are no part of the head, only made for a double-leaf door for the mouth. LYLY–Midas.

Mordre wol out, that see we day by day. 3

CHAUCER—Canterbury Tales. The Nonnes Divers philosophers hold that the lips is parcel Preestes Tale. L. 15,058. of the mouth. Merry Wives of Windsor. Act I. Sc. 1. Theo

12 bald's reading is "mind.” Pope changed

Murder may pass unpunish'd for a time, "mouth" to "mind.”

But tardy justice will o'ertake the crime.

DRYDENThe Cock and the Fox. L. 285. Her lips were red, and one was thin, Compared to that was next her chin,

Murder, like talent, seems occasionally to run (Some bee had stung it newly).

in families. SUCKLING—A Ballad Upon a Wedding. St. 11.

GEORGE HENRY LEWESPhysiology of Com

mon Life. Ch. XII. With that she dasht her on the lippes, So dyed double red;

Absolutism tempered by assassination. Hard was the heart that gave the blow,

COUNT MÜNSTER, Hanoverian envoy at St. Soft were those lippes that bled.

Petersburg, writing of the Russian ConstiWILLIAM WARNER—Albion's England. Bk. tution. VIII. Ch. XLI. St. 53.

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Neque enim lex est æquior ulla, As a pomegranate, cut in twain,

Quam necis artifices arte perire sua. White-seeded is her crimson mouth.

Nor is there any law more just, than that he OSCAR WILDE-La Bella Donna della Mia who has plotted death shall perish by his own Mente.

plot.

OVID-Ars Amatoria. I. 655.
MULBERRY TREE
Morus

One murder made a villain,

Millions a hero.—Princes were privileg'd O, the mulberry-tree is of trees the queen! To kill, and numbers sanctified the crime. Bare long after the rest are green;

Ah! why will kings forget that they are men, But as time steals onwards, while none perceives And men that they are brethren? Slowly she clothes herself with leaves

BISHOP PORTEUSDeath. L. 154. Hides her fruit under them, hard to find.

(See also Young)

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But by and by, when the flowers grow few Murder most foul, as in the best it is;
And the fruits are dwindling and small to view— But this most foul, strange and unnatural.
Out she comes in her matron grace

Hamlet. Act I. Sc. 5. L. 27.
With the purple myriads of her race;
Full of plenty from root to crown,
Showering plenty her feet adown.

For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak While far over head hang gorgeously

With most miraculous organ. Large luscious berries of sanguine dye,

Hamlet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 622. For the best grows highest, always highest,

19 Upon the mulberry-tree.

He took my father grossly, full of bread;
D. M. MULOCK-The Mulberry-Tree.

With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May;
And how his audit stands who knows save

heaven?
MURDER

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 80. Carcasses bleed at the sight of the murderer.

20 BURTON—Anatomy of Melancholy. Pt. I. Sec. 1. Memb. II. Subsec. V.

No place, indeed, should murder sanctuarize.

Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 7. L. 128. Et tu, Brute fili.

21 You also, O son Brutus.

O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, CÆSAR. Words on being stabbed by Brutus, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!

according to SUETONIUS. Quoted as "Et tú Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
Brutus” and “Tu quoque Brute." True That ever lived in the tide of times.
Tragedy of Richarde, Duke of York. (1600) Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood
Also found in S. NICHOLSON'S Acolastus his Over thy wounds now do I prophesy.
Afterwitte. (1600) Cæsar's Legend, in Mirror Julius Cæsar. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 254.

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11 Music tells no truths.

BAILEY-Festus. Sc. A Village Feast.

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Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will

rather The multitudinous seas incardine, Making the green one red.

Macbeth. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 60. Blood hath been shed ere now i' the olden time, Ere humane statute purg'd the gentle weal; Ay, and since too, murders have been perform’d Too terrible for the ear: the time has been, That, when the brains were out, the man would

die, And there an end; but now they rise again, With twenty mortal murders on their crowns, And push us from our stools: this is more strange Than such a murder is.

Macbeth. Act III. Sc. 4. L. 76.

Rugged the breast that music cannot tame. J. C. BAMPFYLDE-Sonnet.

(See also BRAMSTON) 13 If music and sweet poetry agree.

BARNFIELD-Sonnet.

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The great King of kings Hath in the table of his law commanded That thou shalt do no murder:and wilt thou, then, Spurn at his edict and fulfill a man's? Richard III. Act I. Sc. 4. L. 200.

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E un incidente del mestiere.

It is one of the incidents of the profession.
UMBERTO I, of Italy, after escaping death.

Assassination is the perquisite of kings.
Ascribed to him by other authorities.

(Quoted "métier" erroneously.)
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Cast not the clouded gem away,
Quench not the dim but living ray,-

My brother man, Beware!
With that deep voice which from the skies
Forbade the Patriarch's sacrifice.

God's angel, cries, Forbear!
WHITTIERHuman Sacrifice. Pt. VII.

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One to destroy is murder by the law,
And gibbets keep the lifted hand in awe;
To murder thousands takes a specious name,
War's glorious art, and gives immortal fame.
YOUNG-Love of Fame. Satire VII. L. 55.

(See also PORTEUS) 7 Killing no murder. Title of a tract in Harleian Miscellany, as

cribed to COL. SILAS TITUS, recommending the murder of CROMWELL.

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“Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast," And therefore proper at a sheriff's feast. JAMES BRAMSTONMan of Taste. First line

quoted from PRIOR. (See also BAMPFYLDE, CONGREVE, PRIOR) And sure there is music even in the beauty, and the silent note which Cupid strikes, far sweeter than the sound of an instrument; for there is music wherever there is harmony, order, or proportion; and thus far we may maintain the music of the spheres. SIR THOMAS BROWNE-Religio Medici. Pt.

II. Sec. IX. Use of the phrase "Music of the Spheres" given by BISHOP MARTIN FOTHERBY-Athconastrix. P. 315. (Ed. 1622) Said by BISHOP JOHN WILKINS

Discovery of a New World. I. 42. (Ed. 1694) (See also BUTLER, BYRON, COWLEY, JOB, MII

TON, MONTAIGNE, MOORE) Yet half the beast is the great god Pan,

To laugh, as he sits by the river,
Making a poet out of a man.
The true gods sigh for the cost and the pain-
For the reed that grows never more again

As a reed with the reeds of the river.
E. B. BROWNING—A Musical Instrument.

20

9

MUSIC Music religious heat inspires,

It wakes the soul, and lifts it high, And wings it with sublime desires,

And fits it to bespeak the Deity.

ADDISON-A Song for St. Cecilia's Day. St. 4. Music exalts each joy, allays each grief, Expels diseases, softens every pain, Subdues the rage of poison, and the plague. JOHN ARMSTRONG--Art of Preserving Health.

Bk. IV. L. 512. 10 That rich celestial music thrilled the air From hosts on hosts of shining ones, who thronged Eastward and westward, making bright the night. EDWIN ARNOLD-Light of Asia. Bk. IV. L.

418.

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Her voice, the music of the spheres,
So loud, it deafens mortals' ears;
As wise philosophers have thought,
And that's the cause we hear it not.
BUTLER-Hudibras. Pt. II. Canto I. L. 617.

(See also BROWNE)

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Water and air He for the Tenor chose,
Earth made the Base, the Treble Flame arose,
To th' active Moon a quick brisk stroke he gave,
To Saturn's string a touch more soft and grave.
The motions strait, and round, and swift, and

slow,
And short and long, were mixt and woven so,
Did in such artful Figures smoothly fall,
As made this decent measur'd Dance of all.
And this is Musick.
COWLEY-Davideis. Bk. I. P. 13. (1668)

(See also BROWNE)

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Music arose with its voluptuous swell,
Soft eyes look'd love to eyes which spake again,
And all went merry as a marriage bell.

BYRON—Childe Harold. Canto III. St. 21. There's music in the sighing of a reed;

There's music in the gushing of a rill; There's music in all things, if men had ears: Their earth is but an echo of the spheres.

BYRON—Don Juan. Canto XV. St. 5.

With melting airs, or martial, brisk, or grave;
Some chord in unison with what we hear
Is touch'd within us, and the heart replies.
COWPERThe Task. Bk. VI. Winter Walk at

Noon. L. 3.

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In notes by distance made more sweet. COLLINS Passions. L. 60.

(See also WORDSWORTH) 10 In hollow murmurs died away.

COLLINS— Passions. L. 68.

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Our 'prentice, Tom, may now refuse
To wipe his scoundrel master's shoes;
For now he's free to sing and play
Over the hills and far away.
FARQUHAR-Over the Hills and Far Away. Act

II. Sc. 3. (See also STEVENSON, also Gay under Moun

TAINS, FARQUHAR under PATRICTISM) But Bellenden we needs must praise, Who as down the stairs she jumps Sings o'er the hill and far away, Despising doleful dumps. Distracted Jockey's Lamentation. Pills to Purge

Melancholy. 21 Tom he was a piper's son, He learned to play when he was young; But all the tune that he could play Was “Over the hills and far away." Distracted Jockey's Lamentation. Pills to Purge Melancholy found in The

Nursery Rhymes of England by HALLIWELL PHILLIPS. When I was young and had no sense I bought a fiddle for eighteen pence, And all the tunes that I could play Was, "Over the Hills and Far Away." Old Ballad, in the Pedlar's Pack of Ballads and

Songs.

Music has charms to soothe a savage breast,
To soften rocks, or bend a knotted oak.
I've read that things inanimate have moved,
And, as with living souls, have been inform'd,
By magic numbers and persuasive sound.
CONGREVEThe Mourning Bride. Act I. Sc. 1.

(See also BRAMSTON) And when the music goes te-toot, The monkey acts so funny

That we all hurry up and scoot
To get some monkey-money.

M-double-unk for the monkey,
M-double-an for the man;
M-double unky, hunky monkey,

Hunkey monkey-man.
Ever since the world began
Children danced and children ran
When they heard the monkey-man,

The m-double-unky man.
EDMUND VANCE COOKE--The Monkey-Man.

I rule the House.

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I even think that, sentimentally, I am disposed to harmony. But organically I am incapable of a tune.

LAMB-A Chapter on Ears.

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A velvet flute-note fell down pleasantly,
Upon the bosom of that harmony,
And sailed and sailed incessantly,
As if a petal from a wild-rose blown
Had fluttered down upon that pool of tone,
And boatwise dropped o' the convex side
And floated down the glassy tide
And clarified and glorified
The solemn spaces where the shadows bide.
From the warm concave of that fluted note
Somewhat, half song, half odour forth did float
As if a rose might somehow be a throat.
SIDNEY LANIERThe

Symphony.

(See also SHERMAN) Music is in all growing things; And underneath the silky wings

Of smallest insects there is stirred

A pulse of air that must be heard; Earth's silence lives, and throbs, and sings.

LATHROP—Music of Growth.

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He stood beside a cottage lone,

And listened to a lute,
One summer's eve, when the breeze was gone,

And the nightingale was mute.
Thos. HERVEYThe Devil's Progress.

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Why should the devil have all the good tunes? ROWLAND HILL-Sermons. In his biography

by E. W. BROOME. P. 93. Music was a thing of the soul-a rose-lipped shell that murmured of the eternal sea — a strange bird singing the songs of another shore. J. G. HOLLAND-Plain Talks on Familiar

Subjects. Art and Life. (See also ROGERS; also HAMILTON under OCEAN)

Writ in the climate of heaven, in the language

spoken by angels. LONGFELLOW-The Children of the Lord's Sup

per. L. 262. 18 Yea, music is the Prophet's art Among the gifts that God hath sent, One of the most magnificent! LONGFELLOW-Christus. Pt. III. Second In

terlude. St. 5.

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From thy dead lips a clearer note is born Than ever Triton blew from wreathéd horn. HOLMESChambered Nautilus.

(See also WORDSWORTH under CHOICE)

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When she had passed, it seemed like the ceasing of exquisite music.

LONGFELLOW-Evangeline. Pt. I. 1.

20 He is dead, the sweet musician!

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Citharædus Ridetur chorda qui semper oberrat eadem.

The musician who always plays on the same string, is laughed at. HORACE--Ars Poetica. 355.

9 Play uppe, play uppe, O Boston bells! Ply all your changes, all your swells, Play uppe "The Brides of Enderby.' JEAN INGELOW-High Tide on the Coast of

Lincolnshire.

He has moved a little nearer
To the Master of all music.

LONGFELLOW--Hiawatha. Pt. XV. L. 56.

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Music is the universal language of mankind. LONGFELLOW-Outre-Mer. Ancient Spanish

Ballads.

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