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1. La Nature a toujours été en eux plus forte que l'education. Nature has always had more force than education. Voltaire—Life of Molière.

2 And recognizes ever and anon The breeze of Nature stirring in his soul.

WoRDsworth—The Ercursion. Bk. IV.

3 Ah, what a warning for a thoughtless man, Could field or grove, could any spot of earth, Show to his eye an image of the pangs Which it hath witnessed; render back an echo Of the sad steps by which it hath been trod!

WoRDsworth—The Excursion. Bk. VI.

4 The streams with softest sound are flowing, The grass you almost hear it growing, You hear it now, if e'er you can. WoRDsworth—The Idiot Boy. St. 57.

5 Nature never did betray The heart that loved her. won-line Composed Above Tintern

6 As in the eye of Nature he has lived, So in the eye of Nature let him die! WoRDsworth—The Old Cumberland Beggar. Last Lines.

7 The stars of midnight shall be dear To her; and she shall lean her ear In many a secret place Where rivulets dance their wayward round, And beauty born of murmuring sound Shall pass into her face. WoRDsworth—Three Years She Grew in Sun and Shower.

8 Nature's old felicities. WoRDsworth—The T

9 To the solid ground Of Nature trusts the Mind that builds for aye. woom—a Volant Tribe of Bards on arth.

10 Such blessings Nature pours, O'erstock'd mankind enjoy but half her stores. In distant wilds, by human eyes unseen, She rears her flowers, and spreads her velvet

green; Pure gurgling rills the lonely desert trace And waste their music on the savage race. YoUNG—Love of Fame. Satire V. L. 232. (See also CHAMBERLAYNE under Obscurity)

11 Nothing in Nature, much less conscious being, Was e'er created solely for itself. YoUNG—Night Thoughts. Night IX. L. 711. 12 The course of nature governs all! The course of nature is the heart of God. The miracles thou call'st for, this attest; For say, could nature nature's course control? But, miracles apart, who sees Him not? YoUNG—Night Thoughts. Night IX. L. 1,280. (See also BRowNE)

NAVIGATION (See also Navy, OCEAN, SHIPs)

13

O pilot! 'tis a fearful night,

There's danger on the deep.
THOMAS HAYNES BAYLY—The Pilot.

14 How Bishop Aidan foretold to certain seamen a storm that would happen, and gave them some holy oil to lay it. BEDE—Heading of Chapter in his Ecclesiastical History. III. 15. 15 (See also PLINY, PLUTARCH)

O'er the glad waters of the dark blue sea,
Our thoughts as boundless, and our souls as free,
Far as the breeze can bear, the billows foam,
Survey our empire, and behold our home!
ByRoN—The Corsair. Canto I. St. 1.

16 Here's to the pilot that weathered the storm. CANNING—The Pilot that Weathered the Storm.

17 And as great seamen, using all their wealth And skills in Neptune's deep invisible paths, In tall ships richly built and ribbed with brass, To put a girdle round about the world. GEo. CHAPMAN–Bussy d'Ambois. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 20. (See also WEBSTER, also CHAPMAN, MIDsumMER NIGHT's DREAM under ELECTRICITY) 18 A wet sheet and a flowing sea, A wind that follows fast And fills the white and rustling sails, And bends the gallant mast! And bends the gallant mast, my boys, While, like the eagle free, Away the l ship flies, and leaves Old England in the lee. ALLAN CUNNINGHAM—Songs of Scotland. A Wet Sheet and a Flowing Sea.

19 Soon shall thy arm, unconquered steam, afar Drag the slow barge, or drive the rapid car; Or on wide waving wings expanded bear The flying chariot through the fields of air. Fo gown—to Botanic Garden. Pt. . 1.

20

For they say there's a Providence sits up aloft

To keep watch for the life of poor Jack.
CHARLEs DIBDEN–Poor Jack.

21 There's a sweet little cherub that sits up aloft, To keep watch for the life of poor Jack.

CHARLEs DIBDEN–Poor Jack.

22 Skill'd in the globe and sphere, he gravely stands, And, with his compass, measures seas and lands.

DRYDEN–Sixth Satire of Juvenal. L. 760.

23 The winds and waves are always on the side of the ablest navigators. GIBBON–Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Ch. LXVIII.

24

Oh, I am a cook and a captain bold
And the mate of the Nancy brig,

And a bo'sun tight and a midshipmite
And the crew of the captain's gig.
W. S. GILBERT-Yarn of the “Nancy Bell.”

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All in the Downs the fleet was moor'd.
GAY-Sweet William's Farewell to Black-Eyed
Susan.
11
Now landsmen all, whoever you may be,
If you want to rise to the top of the tree,
If your soul isn't fettered to an office stool,
Be careful to be guided by this golden rule—
Stick close to your desks and never go to sea,
And you all may be Rulers of the Queen's Navee.
W. S. GILBERT-H. M. S. Pinafore.
12
Scarce one tall frigate walks the sea
Or skirts the safer shores
Of all that bore to victory
Our stout old Commodores.
Holmes—At a dinner given to ADMIRAL FAR-
RAGUT, July 6, 1865.

13 The credite of the Realme, by defending the same with Wodden Walles, as Themistocles called the Ship of Athens. LINscHote:N–London. Preface to English Trans. (See also ARNE)

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