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14 'Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world. Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 404.

15 And night is fled, Whose pitchy mantle overveil'd the earth. Henry VI. Pt. I. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 1. 16 I must become a borrower of the night For a dark hour or twain. Macbeth. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 27. (See also MooRE)

17 Come, seeling #; Skarf up the tender eye of pitiful day; And with thy bloody and invisible hand, Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond Which keeps me o

Macbeth. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 46.

18 Light thickens; and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood: Good things of the day begin to droop and drowse; Whilesnight's blackagents to their preysdorouse. Macbeth. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 50. 19 The night is long that never finds the day. Macbeth. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 240. (See also MULock) 20 Now the hungry lion roars, And the wolf behowls the moon; Whilst the heavy ploughman snores, All with weary task foredone. Mo Night's Dream. Act W. Sc. 1. L. 78. 21 This is the night That either makes me or fordoes me quite. Othello. Act V. Sc. 1. L. 128.

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10
He killed the noble Mudjokivis.
Of the skin he made him mittens,
Made them with the fur side inside,
Made them with the skin side outside.
He, to get the warm side inside,
Put the inside skin side outside;
He, to get the cold side outside,
Put the warm side fur side inside.
That's why he put the fur side inside,
Why he put the skin side outside,
Why he turned them inside outside.

Given as Anon. in CAROLYN WELLs—Parody

Anthology. P. 120.
(See also STRONG)

11
When Bryan O'Lynn had no shirt to put on,
He took him a sheep skin to make him a' one.
“With the skinny side out, and the wooly side in,
Two warm and convanient,” said Bryan

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12 For blocks are better cleft with wedges, Than tools of sharp or subtle edges, And dullest nonsense has been found By some to be the most profound. BUTLER—Pindaric Ode. IV. L. 82.

13 'Twas brillig, and the slithy towes Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. o CARRoll-Through the Looking-glass. . I. 14 To varnish nonsense with the charms of sound. CHURCHILL-The Apology. L. 219.

15 Conductor, when you receive a fare, Punch in the presence of the passenjare. A blue trip slip for an eight-cent fare, A buff trip slip for a six-cent fare, A pink trip slip for a three-cent fare, Punch in the presence of the passenjare! Chorus Punch, brothers' punch with care! Punch in the presence of the passenjare! S. L. CLEMENs (Mark Twain)—Punch, Brothers, Punch. Used in Literary Nightmare. Notice posted in a car and discovered by Mark Twain. Changed into the above jingle, which became popular, by Isaac Bromley and others. See ALBERT BIGELow PAINE–Biography of Mark Twain. 16 Misce stultitiam consiliis breven: Dulce est desipere in loco. Mingle a little folly, with your wisdom; a little nonsense now and then is pleasant. HoRACE—Carmina. IV. 12. 27.

17 How pleasant to know Mr. Lear! Who has written such volumes of stuff! Some think him ill-tempered and queer, But a few think him pleasant enough. Edward LEAR-Lines to a Young Lady. 18 No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the misfortune is to do it solemnly. MontaignE-Essays. Bk. III. Ch. I. 19 There's a skin without and a skin within, A covering skin and a lining skin, But the skin within is the skin without Doubled and carried complete throughout. Power of Atherstone. (See also STRONG)

20 From the Squirrel skin Marcosset Made some mittens for our hero. Mittens with the fur-side inside, With the fur side next his fingers So's to keep the hand warm inside. G. STRoNg (“Marc Antony Henderson”)— Song of the Milgenwater. Parody of Hiawatha. (See also ANoN QUoTATION, Power) 21 A careless song, with a little nonsense in it now and then, does not misbecome a monarch. o WALPolo—Letter to Sir Horace Mann. 1770

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