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1 Who fears to speak of Ninety-eight? Who blushes at the name? When cowards mock the patriot's fate, Who hangs his head for shame? John K. INGRAM—In The Dublin Nation. April 1, 1843. Vol. II. P. 339.

2 Our federal Union: it must be preserved. ANDREw JACKSON.—Toast given at the Jefferson Birthday Celebration in 1830. See W. J. SUMNER's Life of Jackson.

3 Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel. SAMUEL JoHNSON.—Boswell's Life of Johnson. (1775)

4 That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins of Iona. SAMUEL JoHNSON.—A Journey to the Western Islands. Inch Kenneth.

5 Pater patriæ. Father of his country. JUVENAL–Sat. VIII. 244. Title bestowed on Cicero (B.C. 64) after his consulship, “a mark of distinction which none ever gained before.”. PLUTARCH-Life of Cicero. PLINY. Bk. VII, calls CICERo “Parens patriae.” Title conferred on Peter the Great by the Russian Senate. (1721) See Post-Boy, Dec.28–30, 1721. Also applied to AUGUSTU's CAESAR and MARIUs. (See also MARTIAL, MAssINGER, SENECA, also KNox under WASHINGTON)

6 Je meurs content, je meurs pour la liberté de mon pays. I die content, I die for the liberty of my country. Attributed to LR PELLETIER, also to MARSHAL LANNEs.

7 The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature. LINCOLN–Inaugural Address. March 4, 1861. 8 Is it an offence, is it a mistake, is it a crime to take a hopeful view of the prospects of your own country? Why should it be? Why should patriotism and pessimism be identical? Hope is the mainspring of patriotism. LLoyd GEORGE–House of Commons, Oct. 30, 1919.

9

And how can man die better
Than facing fearful odds,

For the ashes of his fathers
And the temples of his gods?
MACAULAY—Horatius keeps the Bridge.

10 "Twere sweet to sink in death for Truth and Freedom! Yes, who would hesitate, for who could bear The living degradation we may know

If we do dread death for a sacred cause? TERENCE McSwiney—Limes written when a boy. In the Nation, Nov. 3, 1920.

11 Our spirit is . . . to show ourselves eager to work for, and if need be, to die for the Irish Republic. Facing our enemy we must declare an attitude simply. We ask for no mercy and we will make no compromise. TERENCE McSwiney, Lord Mayor of Cork. From a document in his possession when he was sentenced, in August, 1920. 12 Vox diversa sonat: populorum estvoxtamen una, Cum verus PATRLE diceris esse PATER. There are many different voices and languages; but there is but one voice of the peoples when you are declared to be the true “Father of your country.” MARTIAL–De Spectaculis. III. 11. (See also JUVENAL)

13 We, that would be known The father of our people, in our study And vigilance for their safety, must not change This ploughshares into swords, and force them

rom

The secure shade of their own vines, to be
Scorched with the flames of war.

MAssinger—The Maid of Honour. Act I. 1.

14 (See also Juvenal)

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9 All these you may avoid but the Lie Direct; and you may avoid that too, with an If. I knew when seven justices could not take up a quarrel, but when the ies were met themselves, one of them ho of an If, as, “If you said so then Isaid so"; and they shook hands and swore brothers. Your If is the only peace-maker; much virtue in If. As You Like It. Act W. Sc. 4. L. 100. 10 That it should hold companionship in E. With honour, as in war; since that to both It stands in like request. Coriolanus. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 49. 11 A peace is of the nature of a conquest; For then both parties nobly are subdued, And neither party loser. Henry IV. Pt. II. Act IV. Sc. 2. L. 89. 12 In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility. Henry V. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 3.

13 Peace, Dear nurse of arts, plenties and joyful births. Henry V. Act V. Sc. 2. L. 34.

14

Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace,

To silence envious tongues.
Henry VIII. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 445.

15 To reap the harvest of perpetual peace, By this one bloody trial of sharp war.

Richard III. Act V. Sc. 2. L. 15.

16 And for the peace of you I hold such strife As 'twixt a miser and his wealth is found.

Sonnet LXXV.

17 When it is peace, then we may view again With new-won eyes each other's truer form And wonder. Grown more loving-kind and warm We'll grasp firm hands and laugh at the old pain When it is peace. But until peace, the storm The darkness and the thunder and the rain.

CHARLEs Sorley–To Germany.

18 Let the bugles sound the Truce of God to the whole world forever. CHARLEs SUMNER—Oration on the True Grandeur of Nations. 19 In this surrender—if such it may be called— the National Government does not even stoop to conquer. It simply lifts itself to the height of its original principle. The early efforts of its best negotiators, the patriotic trial of its soldiers ... may at last prevail. CHARLEs SUMNER. Sustaining President Lincoln in the U. S. Senate, in the Trent Affair. Jan. 7, 1862. (See also WILSON)

20 Auferre, trucidare, rapere, falsis nominibus imperium, atque, ubi solitudinem faciunt, pacem appellant. To rob, to ravage, to murder, in their imposing language, are the arts of civil policy. When they have made the world a solitude, they call it peace. TACITUs—Agricola. XXX. Ascribing the speech to Galgacus, Britain's leader against the Romans. (See also ByRON)

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