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10 PEACOCK

For to: seemed resting on his nod,
As they could read in all eyes. Now to them,
Who were accustomed, as a sort of god,
To see the sultan, rich in many a gem,
Like an imperial peacock stalk abroad
(That royal bird, whose tail's a diadem,)
With all the pomp of power, it was a doubt
How power could condescend to do without.
BYRON-Don Juan. Canto VII. St. 74.
11
To frame the little animal, provide
All the gay hues that wait on female pride:
Let Nature guide thee; sometimes golden wire
The shining bellies of the fly require;
The peacock's plumes thy tackle must not fail,
Nor the dear purchase .the sable's tail.
GAY—Rural Sports. Canto I. L. 177.

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12 Gutta cavat lapidem non vi, sed sæpe cadendo. The drop hollows out the stone not by strength, but by constant falling. Quoted in the Menagiana, 1713. Probably first to use it was RICHARD, Monk of S. WICTOR; Paris. (Died about 1172. Scotchman by birth.) In his Adnotationes mysticae in Psalmos he says: “Quid lapide durius, quid aqua mollius? Verumtamen gutta cavat lapidem non vised sæpe cadendo.” See MIGNE's Patrologia Latina. Vol. CXCVI. P. 389. Said to be by CHOFRILUs of SAMos, by SIMPLICIUs—Ad Aristot. Physic. Auscult. VIII. 2. P. 429. (Brand's ed.) Same idea in LUCRETIUs I. 314; also in IV. 1282. Trans. of a proverb quoted by GALEN. Wol. VIII. P. 27. Ed. by Kühn, 1821,

Given there: “Gutta cavat lapidem saepe cadentis aquae.” Quoted by BION. Also in OvID—Ez Ponte. IV. X. L. 5. Note by Burman states CLAUDLAN was earliest user found in MS.

(See also LYLY)

13 So Satan, whom repulse upon repulse Met ever, and to shameful silence brought, Yet gives not o'er, though desperate of success. MILTON.—Paradise Regained. Bk. IV. L. 21.

14 Water continually dropping will wear hard rocks hollow. PLUTARCH-Of the Training of Children. (See also LYLy)

15 We shall escape the uphill by never turning back. CHRISTINA G. RossETTI—Amor Mundi.

16 Many strokes, though with a little axe Hew down and fell the hardest-timber'd oak. Henry VI. Pt. III. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 54.

17 Perseverance, dear my lord,
Keeps honour bright: to have done is to hang
Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail
In monumental mockery.

Troilus and Cressida. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 150.

18 PHEASANT

Fesaunt excedeth all fowles in sweetnesse and holsomnesse, and is equall to capon in nourish

ynge. SIR. T. ELYoT—The Castle of Helth. Ch. VIII.

19 The fesant hens of Colchis, which have two ears as it were consisting of feathers, which they will set up and lay down as they list. PLINY—Natural History. Bk. X. Ch. XLVIII. Holland's trans.

20 See! from the brake the whirring pheasant springs, And mounts exulting on triumphant wings: Short is his joy; he feels the fiery wound, Flutters in blood, and panting beats the ground. Pope—Windsor Forest. L. 111.

21 PHILADELPHIA

They say that the lady from Philadelphia who is staying in town is very wise. Suppose I go ask her what is best to be done.

LUCRETIA P. HALE—Peterkin Papers. Ch. I.

22 Hail! Philadelphia, tho' Quaker thou be, The birth-day of medical honors to thee In o country belongs; ’twas thou caught the ame, That crossing the ocean from Englishmen came And kindled the fires of Wisdom and Knowledge, Inspired the student, erected a college, First held a commencement with suitable state, In the year of our Lord, seventeen sixty-eight. w; Todd HELMUTH-The Story of a City octor.

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