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Wasglänzt ist für den Augenblick geboren;
Das Rechte bleibt der Nachwelt unverloren.

What dazzles, for the moment spends its spirit;
What's genuine, shall posterity inherit.
GOETHE-Faust. Vorspiel auf dem Theater.

L. 41.
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Muore per metà chi lascia un'immagine di se stesso nei figli.

He only half dies who leaves an image of himself in his sons. GOLDONIPamela. II. 2. 3 As to posterity, I may ask (with somebody whom I have forgot) what has it ever done to oblige me? GRAY-Letier to Dr. Wharton. March 8, 1758.

(See also ROCHE) Audiet pugnas, vitio parentum Rara juventus.

Posterity, thinned by the crime of its ancestors, shall hear of those battles. HORACE-Odes. Bk. I. 2. 23. 5

Ich verachte die Menschheit in allen ihren Schichten; ich sehe es voraus, dass unsere Nachkommen noch weit unglücklicher sein werden, als wir. Sollte ich nicht ein Sünder sein, wenn ich trotz dieser Ansicht für Nachkommen, d. h. für Unglückliche sorgte?

I despise mankind in all its strata; I foresee that our descendants will be still far unhappier than we are. Would I not be a criminal if

, notwithstanding this view, I should provide for progeny, i. e. for unfortunates? ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT, during a con

versation with ARAGO in 1812. The man was laughed at as a blunderer who said in a public business: "We do much for posterity; I would fain see them do something for MRS. ELIZABETH MONTAGU—Letters. Jan. 1, 1742.

(See also ROCHE)

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A foreign nation is a kind of contemporaneous posterity.

H. B. WALLACE-Stanley. Vol. II. P. 89. (See also DE Staël. Same idea in FRANKLIN'S

Letter to Wm. STRAHAN, 1745).

POTOMAC (RIVER) And Potomac flowed calmly, scarce heaving her

breast, With her low-lying billows all bright in the west, For a charm as from God lulled the waters to rest

Of the fair rolling river. PAUL HAMILTON HAYNE-Beyond the Potomac.

POTTERY 17 I am content to be a bric-a-bracker and a Ceramiker. S. L. CLEMENS (Mark Twain).–Tramp Abroad.

Ch. XX.

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Us.

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Why should we put ourselves out of our way to do anything for posterity; for what has posterity done for us? SIR BOYLE ROCHE. During Grattan's Parlia

ment. See C. LITTON FLAKINER's Studies

in Irish History and Biography. (See also GRAY, MONTAGUE, STEELE, TRUM

BULL) Culpam majorum posteri luunt.

Posterity pays for the sins of their fathers. QUINTUS CURTIUS RUFUSDe Rebus Gestis

Alexandri Magni. VII. 5.

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Thou spring'st a leak already in thy crown,
A flaw is in thy ill-bak'd vessel found;
'Tis hollow, and returns a jarring sound,
Yet thy moist clay is pliant to command,
Unwrought, and easy to the potter's hand:
Now take the mould; now bend thy mind to feel
The first sharp motions of the forming wheel.

DRYDENThird Satire of Persius. L. 35.
There's a joy without canker or cark,

There's a pleasure eternally new,
Tis to gloat on the glaze and the mark

Of china that's ancient and blue;

Unchipp'd, all the centuries through
It has pass'd, since the chime of it rang,

And they fashion'd it, figures and hue,
In the reign of the Emperor Hwang.

Quid quæris, quamdiu vixit? Vixit ad posteros.

Why do you ask, how long has he lived? He has lived to posterity, SENECA--Epistles. XCIII.

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Les étrangers sont la postérité contemporaine.

Strangers are contemporary posterity. MADAME DE STAËL. See the Journal of CaMILLE DESMOULINS.

(See also WALLACE)

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Here's a pot with a cot in a park,

In a park where the peach-blossoms blew,
Where the lovers eloped in the dark,

Lived, died, and were changed into two
Bright birds that eternally Hew
Through the boughs of the May, as they sang;

'Tis a tale was undoubtedly true In the reign of the Emperor Hwang.

ANDREW LANG-Ballade of Blue China.
Turn, turn, my wheel! Turn round and round
Without a pause, without a sound:

So spins the flying world away!
This clay, well mixed with marl and sand,
Follows the motion of my hand;
For some must follow, and some command,

Though all are made of clay!
LONGFELLOW-Keramos. L. 1.

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Oh, the little more, and how much it is!

And the little less, and what worlds away.

ROBERT BROWNINGBy the Fireside. St. 39. Needy knife-grinder! whither are ye going? Rough is the road, your wheel is out of order; Bleak blows the blast-your hat has got a hole

in it.
So have your breeches.
CANNING-The Friend of Humanity and the

Knife-Grinder.
Thank God for poverty

That makes and keeps us free,
And lets us go our unobtrusive way,

Glad of the sun and rain,
Upright, serene, humane,
Contented with the fortune of a day.

BLISS CARMAN—The Word at Saint Kavin's.

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Figures that almost move and speak.

LONGFELLOW-Keramos. L. 236.

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Paupertatis onus patienter ferre memento.

Patiently bear the burden of poverty.
DIONYSIUS CaroDisticha. Lib. I. 21.

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He is now fast rising from affluence to poverty.
S. L. CLEMENS Mark Twain)—Henry Ward

Beecher's Farm.

And yonder by Nankin, behold!
The Tower of Porcelain, strange and old,
Uplifting to the astonished skies
Its ninefold painted balconies,
With balustrades of twining leaves,
And roofs of tile, beneath whose eaves
Hang porcelain bells that all the time
Ring with a soft, melodious chime;
While the whole fabric is ablaze

With varied tints, all fused in one
Great mass of color, like a maze

Of flowers illumined by the sun.
LONGFELLOW-Keramos. L. 336.

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Said one among them: "Surely not in vain Content with poverty, my soul I arm;

My substance of the common Earth was ta’en And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.

And to this Figure moulded, to be broke, DRYDENThird Book of Horace. Ode 29. Or trampled back to shapeless Earth again.” OMAR KHAYYAM-Rubaiyat. St. 87. FITZ- Living from hand to mouth. GERALD's trans.

DU BARTAS-Divine Weekes and Workes. Sec

ond Week. First Day. Pt. IV. All this of Pot and Potter-Tell me then, Who is the Potter, pray, and who the Pot? The greatest man in history was the poorest. OMAR KHAYYAMRubaiyat. St. 87. Fitz EMERSONDomestic Life. GERALD's trans.

Thou source of all my bliss and all my woe, Hath not the potter power over the clay, of That found'st me poor at first, and keep'st me so. the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, GOLDSMITHDeserted Village. L. 413. and another upto dishonour? Romans. IX. 21.

The nakedness of the indigent world may be

clothed from the trimmings of the vain. POVERTY

GOLDSMITH-Vicar of Wakefield. Ch. IV.

(See also SHELLEY under LABOR) Paupertas omnium artium repertrix. Poverty is the discoverer of all the arts.

Chill penury repress'd their noble rage,
APOLLONIUSDe Magia. P. 285. 35.

And froze the genial current of the soul.
Leave the poor

GRAY-Elegy in a Country Churchyard. St. 13.
Some time for self-improvement. Let them not
Be forced to grind the bones out of their arms Poverty is no sin.
For bread, but have some space to think and feel

HERBERT Jacula Prudentum. Like moral and immortal creatures. BAILEY-Festus. Sc. A Country Toun. Yes, child of suffering, thou may'st well be sure

He who ordained the Sabbath loves the poor! L'or même à la laideur donne un teint de beauté: 0. W. HOLMES–Urania; or, A Rhymed LesMais tout devient affreux avec la pauvreté.

son. L. 325. Gold gives an appearance of beauty even to ugliness: but with poverty everything be O God! that bread should be so dear, comes frightful.

And flesh and blood so cheap! BOILEAU- Satires. VIII. 209.

HOOD-The Song of the Shirt.

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1 Stitch! stitch! stitch!
In poverty, hunger, and dirt,

Non est paupertas, Nestor, habere nihil.
And still with a voice of dolorous pitch,

To have nothing is not poverty.
Would that its tone could reach the Rich,

MARTIAL-Epigrams. XI. 32. 8.
She sang this "Song of the Shirt!”
HOOD Song of the Shirt. St. 11.

La pauvreté des biens est aysee à guerir; la

pauvreté de l'âme, impossible. Magnas inter opes inops.

The lack of wealth is easily repaired; but Penniless amid great plenty.

the poverty of the soul is irreparable. HORACE—Carmina. Bk. III. 16. 28.

MONTAIGNE--Essays. III. 10. Pauper enim non est cui rerum suppetet usus. Rattle his bones over the stones!

He is not poor who has the use of necessary He's only a pauper whom nobody owns! things.

THOMAS NOEL-The Pauper's Drive. HORACE—Epistles. I. 12. 4.

Horrea formicæ tendunt ad inania nunquam Ibit eo quo vis qui zonam perdidit.

Nullus ad amissas ibit amicus opes. The man who has lost his purse will go

Ants do not bend their ways to empty wherever you wish.

barns, so no friend will visit the place of de HORACE- Epistles. II. 2. 40.

parted wealth.

OVIDTristium. I. 9. 9.
Grind the faces of the poor.
Isaiah. III. 15.

Inops, potentem dum vult imitari, perit.

The poor, trying to imitate the powerful, perish.

PHÆDRUS-Fables. I. 24. 1.
The poor always ye have with you.
John. XII. 8.

Paupertas. . omnes artes perdocet.

Poverty is a thorough instructress in all the All this (wealthị excludes but one evil,--pov arts. erty.

PLAUTUS-Stichus. Act II. 1. ŠAMUEL JOHNSON—Boswell's Life of Johnson. (1777)

But to the world no bugbear is so great,

As want of figure and a small estate. Nil habet infelix paupertas durius in se

POPE-First Book of Horace. Ep. I. L. 67. Quam quod ridiculos homines facit.

Cheerless poverty has no harder trial than Where are those troops of poor, that throng'd of this, that it makes men the subject of ridicule. yore JUVENAL—Satires. III. V. 152.

The good old landlord's hospitable door?

POPE-Satires of Dr. Donne. Satire II. L. 113. Haud facile emergunt quorum virtutibus obstat Res angusta domi.

So shall thy poverty come as one that travelThey do not easily rise whose abilities are leth, and thy want as an armed man. repressed by poverty at home.

Proverbs. VI. 11. JUVENAL—Satires. III. 164. 10

The destruction of the poor is their poverty. Hic vivimus ambitiosa

Proverbs. X. 15. Paupertate omnes.

25 Here we all live in ambitious poverty.

He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto JUVENALSatires. III. 182.

the Lord. 11

Proverbs. XIX. 17.
O Poverty, thy thousand ills combined
Sink not so deep into the generous mind, Blessed is he that considereth the poor.
As the contempt and laughter of mankind.

Psalms. XLI. 1.
JUVENAL-Satires. III. L. 226. GIFFORD'S
trans.

Whene'er I walk the public ways, 12 Cantabit vacuus coram latrone viator.

How many poor that lack ablution

Do probe my heart with pensive gaze, The traveler without money will sing before And beg a trivial contribution. the robber.

OWEN SEAMANBitter Cry of the Great Unpaid. JUVENAL-Satires. X. 22.

(See also WATTS) 13 Paupertas fugitur, totoque arcessitur orbe. Non qui parum habet, sed qui plus cupit,

Poverty is shunned and persecuted all over pauper est. the globe.

Not he who has little, but he who wishes for LUCAN-Pharsalia. I. 166.

more, is poor.

SENECA-Epistolæ Ad Lucilium. II. If you are poor now, Æmilianus, you will always be poor. Riches are now given to none Nemo tam pauper vivit quam natus est. but the rich.

No one lives so poor as he is born. MARTIAL-Epigrams. Bk. V. Ep. 8.

SENECA–Quare bonis viris.

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No, madam, 'tis not so well that I am poor, though many of the rich are damned. All's Well That Ends Well. Act I. Sc. 3. L.

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I am as poor as Job, my lord, but not so patient.

Henry IV. Pt. II. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 144.

Then, everlasting Love, restrain thy will;
'Tis god-like to have power, but not to kill.

BEAUMONT FLETCHER—The Chances.

Act II. Sc. 2. Song.
The balance of power,
BURKE-Speech. (1741) SIR ROBT. Wal-

POLE-Speech. (1741) JOHN WESLEY-
Journal, Sept. 20, 1790, ascribes it to "the
King of Sweden.“ A German Diet, or the
Ballance of Europe. Title of a Folio of 1653.

(See also WELLINGTON)

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Poor and content is rich and rich enough,
But riches fineless is as poor as winter
To him that ever fears he shall be poor.

Othello. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 172.

Dim with the mist of years, gray flits the shade of power.

BYRON—Childe Harold. Canto II. St. 2.

Men are never very wise and select in the exercise of a new power. WM. ELLERY CHANNINGThe Present Age.

An Address. (1841)

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Steep'd me in poverty to the very lips.

Othello. Act IV. Sc. 2. L. 50.

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Iron hand in a velvet glove.
Attributed to CHARLES V. Used also by

NAPOLEON. See CARLYLE—Latter Day Pam

phlets, No. II. To know the pains of power, we must go to those who have it; to know its pleasures, we must go to those who are seeking it: the pains of power are real, its pleasures imaginary.

C. C. COLTONLacon. P. 255.

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His rawbone cheekes, through penurie and pine, Were shronke into his jawes, as he did never dyne. SPENSER—Faerie Queene. Bk. I. Canto IX.

St. 35.

Qui peut ce qui lui plaît, commande alors qu'il prie.

Whoever can do as he pleases, commands when he entreats. CORNEILLE-Sertorius. IV. 2.

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