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C'est un faible roseau que la prospérité.

Prosperity is a feeble reed.
DANIEL D'ANCHÈRESTyr et Sidon.

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Alles in der Welt lässt sich ertragen,
Nur nicht eine Reihe von schönen Tagen.

Everything in the world may be endured, except only a succession of prosperous days. GOETHE-Sprüche in Reimen. III.

17

Prosperity lets go the bridle.

HERBERT-Jacula Prudentum.

18

The desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose.

Isaiah. XXXV. 1.

A tunnel underneath the sea from Calais straight

to Dover, Sir, The squeamish folks may cross by land from

shore to shore, With sluices made to drown the French, if e'er

they would come over, Sir, Has long been talk'd of, till at length 'tis

thought a monstrous bore. THEODORE HOOK-Bubbles of 1825. In John

Bull, 1825. 2

This solemn moment of triumph, one of the greatest moments in the history of the world .. this great hour which rings in a new

. and which is going to lift up humanity to a higher plane of existence for all the ages of the future. DAVID LLOYD GEORGE. Speech at Guildhall

after the signing of the Armistice, Nov. 11,

1918. My gran’ther's rule was safer 'n 't is to crow: Don't never prophesy-onless ye know. LOWELL-Biglow Papers. No. 2. Mason and Slidell.

(See also CICERO) It takes a mind like Dannel's, fact, ez big ez all

ou'doors To find out thet it looks like rain arter it fairly

pours.
LOWELL-Biglow Papers. No. 9. L. 97.
5

A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country and in his own house.

Matthew. XIII. 57. No mighty trance, or breathed spell Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic

cell.

MILTONHymn on Christ's Nativity. L. 173. Till old experience do attain To something like prophetic strain. MILTON-İl Penseroso. L. 173.

(See also ERASMUS) 8 Is Saul also among the prophets?

I Samuel. X. 11. O my prophetic soul! My uncle!

Hamlet. Act I. Sc. 5. L. 40.

10
There is a history in all men's lives,
Figuring the nature of the times deceas'd,
The which observed, a man may prophesy.
With a near aim, of the main chance of things
As yet not come to life, which in their seeds
And weak beginnings lie intreasured.

Henry IV. Pt. II. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 80.
11

Prognostics do not always prove prophecies, at least the wisest prophets make sure of the event first. HORACE WALPOLELetter to Thos, Walpole. Feb. 9, 1785.

(See also CICERO) 12

Your fathers, where are they? And the prophets, do they live forever?

Zechariah. I. 5.

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I'll print it, And shame the fools.

POPEPrologue to Satires. L. 61.

Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school: and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.

Henry VI. Pt. II. Act IV. Sc. 7. L. 35.

The jour printer with gray head and gaunt jaws

works at his case, He turns his quid of tobacco, while his eyes blur

with the manuscript. WALT WHITMANLeaves of Grass. Walt Whit

man. Pt. XV. St. 77.

PRISON
In durance vile here must I wake and weep,
And all my frowsy couch in sorrow steep.
BURNS Epistle from Esopus to Maria in

CHAMBERS' Burns' Life and Work. Vol. IV.
P. 54.

(See also KENDRICK)

Whene'er with haggard eyes I view

This dungeon that I'm rotting in,
I think of those companions true
Who studied with me at the U-

Niversity of Göttingen.
GEORGE CANNING—Song. Of One Eleven

Years in Prison. Found in The Poetry of the
Anti-Jacobin. Also in Burlesque Plays and

Poems, edited by HENRY MORLEY.
Prison'd in a parlour snug and small,
Like bottled wasps upon a southern wall.

COWPERRetirement. L. 493. 7

“And a bird-cage, sir,” said Sam. "Veels vithin veels, a prison in a prison.”

DICKENSPickwick Papers. Ch. XL.

As if a wheel bad been in the midst of a wheel.

Ezekiel. X. 10.

9 In durance vile. WILLIAM KENDRICK-Falstaff's Wedding. Act

I. Sc. 2. BURKEThoughts on the Present
Discontent.

(See also BURNS)
10
That which the world miscalls a jail,

A private closet is to me. Locks, bars, and solitude together met, Make me no prisoner, but an anchoret. Attributed to Sir ROGER L'ESTRANGE. Also

to LORD CAPEL. Found in the New Foundling Hospital for Wit. (Ed. 1786) IV. 40, as a supplementary stanza. See Notes and Queries, April 10, 1909. P. 288.

Stone walls do not a prison make,

Nor iron bars a cage,
Minds innocent and quiet take

That for an hermitage.
LOVELACETo Althea, from Prison. IV.

Atunnel underneath the ses from Calais straight

PROPRIETY (See MANNERS) to Dover. Sir, The squeamish folks may cross by land from

PROSPERITY (See also SUCCESS) shore to shore. With sluiees made to drown the French, if e'er

In rebus prosperis, superbiam, fastidium an they would come aver, Sir,

rogantiamque magno opere fugiamus. Has long been talk'd of, till at lengti "tis

In prosperity let us most carefully avoid thought a monstrous bare.

pride, disdain, and arrogance. DEEODORE HOOK–Bubbies of 1825. In John

CICERO—De Officiis. I 2. Bul. 1825.

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Ct adversas res, seeundas immoderate ferre, This solemn moment of triumph, one of the levitatis est. greatest moments in the history of the world

It shows a weak mind not to bear prosperity this great hour which rings in a new as well as adversity with moderation.

and which is going to lift up hu CICERO—De Officiis. I. 26. mamtv to a higher plane of existence for all the 15 wes of he future.

C'est un faible roseau que la prospérité. DAVID LLOYD GORGE. Speech at Guldhall Prosperity is a feeble reed.

after the signing of the Armistice, Nov. II, DANIEL D'ANCHÈRES-Tyr et Sidon.

1918. Vy unnther's mile was safer 'n 't is to crow:

Alles in der Welt lässt sich ertragen, Don t never prophesy-onless ye know.

Vur nicht eine Reihe von schönen Tagen. LOWELL-Biglow Papers, No. 2. Mason and

Everything in the world may be endured, Slideil.

except only a succession of prosperous days See also CICERO)

GOETEE-Sprüche in Reimen. III. It takes a mind like Dannel's, fact, ez big ez all Prosperity lets go the bridle.

17 ou toors

HERBERT Jacula Prudentum. To find out thet it looks like rain arter it fairly pours.

18 LOWELI-Biglow Papers. No. 9. L. 97. The desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose.

Iscriah. XXXV. 1. prophet is not without honour, save in his dwn country and in his own house. Watthew. XIII. 57.

I wish you every kind of prosperity, with a little more taste.

ALAIN RENÉ LE SAGEG Blas. Bk. VII. Va mighty trance, or breathed spell Inspires the paleeyed priest from the prophetic

Ch. IV. HENRI VAN LAUN's trans. cell

Felix se nescit amari. VILTON—Hymn on Christ's Vaiirity. L. 173.

The prosperous man does not know whether

he is loved. Till old experience do attain To something like prophetic strain.

LCCARPharsalia. VII. 727. MILTON-İL Pengeroso. L. 173.

21 See also ERASMCS)

They shall sit every man under his vine and I Saul also among the prophets?

under his fig-tree.

Micah. IV. 4.
I Samuel. I. II.
O my prophetic soull

Surer to prosper than prosperity could have My uncle!

assur'd us. Hamlet. Aet I. Se. 5. L. 40.

MILTON—Paradise Lost. Bk. II. L. 39.
1
There is a history in all men's lives,
Figuring the nature of the times deceas'd,

Length of days is in her right hand; and in her The which observed, a man may prophesy

left hand riches and honour. With a near aim, of the main chance of things

Proverbs. III. 16.
As yet not come to life, which in their seeds
And wenk beginnings lie intreasured.

Est felicibus difficilis miserarium vera æstimatio. Henry IV. Pt. II. Act III. Se. 1. L. 80. The prosperous can not easily form a right 11

idea of misery Pronostics do not always prove prophecies, QUINTILIAN—De Institutione Oratoria. IX. 6. at least the wisest prophets make sure of the

35 event first HORACE WALPOLE—Letter to Thos. Walpole.

Res secundæ valent commutare naturam, et Feb. 9. 1795.

raro quisquam erga bona sua satis cautus est. (See also CICERO)

Prosperity can change man's nature; and

seldom is any one cautious enough to resist Your fathers, where are they? And the proph the effects of good fortune. sta, do they live forever?

QUINTUS CURTIUS RUFUS-De Rebus Gestis Zacharian. I 5.

Alexandri Magni. X. 1. 40.

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1 Remember, when the judgment's weak,

Oh! Why should the spirit of mortal be proud? The prejudice is strong.

Like a swift-fleeting meteor, a fast flying cloud, KANE O'HARA—Midas. Air. Act I. Sc. 3. A flash of the lightning, a break of the wave,

Man passes from life to his rest in the grave. PRESENT (See TODAY)

Wm. Knox-Mortality. (Lincoln's favorite

hymn.) PRESENTS (See GENEROSITY, GIFTS)

What the weak head with strongest bias rules, PRESUMPTION

Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools. Presume to lay their hand upon the ark

POPEEssay on Criticism. L. 203.

16 Of her magnificent and awful cause. COWPERThe Task. Bk. II. The Timepiece. All quit their

sphere and rush into the skies.

In pride, in reas’ning pride, our error lies; L. 231.

Pride still is aiming at the bless'd abodes, 3

Men would be angels, angels would be gods. It is not so with Him that all things knows

POPE—Essay on Man. Ep. I. L. 124.
As 'tis with us that square our guess by shows:
But most it is presumption in us when

Thus unlamented pass the proud away,
The help of heaven we count the act of men. The gaze of fools and pageant of a day;
All's Well That Ends Well. Act II. Sc. 1. L. So perish all

, whose breast ne'er learn'd to glow 152.

For others' good, or melt at others' woe.

POPE—Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. L. 4. He will steal himself into a man's favour and for a week escape a great deal of discoveries; but Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty when you find him out, you have him ever after.

spirit before a fall. All's Well That Ends Well. Act III. Sc. 6. Proverbs. XVI. 18.

L. 97. 5

Is this that haughty, gallant, gay Lothario? How dare the plants look up to heaven, from NICHOLAS ROWEThe Fair Penitent. Act V. whence

Sc. 1. L. 37. Taken from MASSINGER'S They have their nourishment?

Fatal Dowry. Pericles. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 55.

In general, pride is at the bottom of all great PRIDE

mistakes. As proud as Lucifer.

RUSKIN—True and Beautiful. Morals and ReBAILEY-Festus. Sc. A Country Town.

ligion. Conception of God. P. 426. 7 Ay, do despise me, I'm the prouder for it;

Why, who cries out on pride, I like to be despised.

That can therein tax any private party?

Doth it not flow as hugely as the sea. BICKERSTAFF-The Hypocrite. Act V. Sc. 1.

As You Like It. Act II. Sc. 7. L. 70.
8
They are proud in humility, proud in that Prouder than rustling in unpaid-for silk.
they are not proud.

Cymbeline. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 24.
BURTON- Anatomy of Melancholy. Pt. I. Sec.
II. Memb. 3. Subsect. 14.

She bears a duke's revenues on her back,

And in her heart she scorns our poverty. Let pride go afore, shame will follow after. Henry VI. Pt. II. Act I. Sc. 3. L. 83. GEORGE CHAPMAN-Eastward Ho. Act III. Sc. 1. (Written by CHAPMAN, JONSON, and 24

I have ventur'd, MARSTON.)

Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders, 10

This many summers in a sea of glory, Pride (of all others the most dang'rous fault) But far beyond my depth: my high-blown pride Proceeds from want of sense, or want of thought. At length broke under me. WENTWORTH DILLON-Essay on Translated Henry VIII. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 358.

Verse. L. 161. 11

He that is proud eats up himself: pride is his Lord of human kind.

own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle; DRYDEN—Spanish Friar. Act II. Sc. 1. and whatever praises itself but in the deed, de

(See also GOLDSMITH, SHULDHAM) vours the deed in the praise. 12

Troilus and Cressida. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 164. Zu strenge Ford'rung ist verborgner Stolz. Too rigid scruples are concealed pride.

I do hate a proud man, as I hate the engenderGOETHE-Iphigenia auf Tauris. IV. 4. 120.

ing of toads. 13

Troilus and Cressida. Act II, Sc. 3. L. 169. Pride in their port, defiance in their eye, I see the lords of humankind pass by.

He is so plaguy proud that the death tokens of it GOLDSMITH-The Traveller. L. 327.

Cry “No recovery." (See also DRYDEN)

Troilus and Cressida. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 187

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PRIMROSE

Primula Ring-ting! I wish I were a primrose, A bright yellow primrose blowing in the spring!

The stooping boughs above me,

The wandering bee to love me, The fern and moss to creep across,

And the elm-tree for our king!

WM. ALLINGHAM–Wishing. A Child's Song. The primrose banks how fair! BURNS-My Chloris, Mark How Green the

Groves.

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Ez to my princerples, I glory
In hevin' nothin' o' the sort.
LOWELLThe Biglow Papers. First Series.
No. VII. St. 10.

PRINTING
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Memoriæ sacrum

Typographia
Ars artium omnium

Conservatrix
Hic primum inventa
Circa annum mccccxl.

Sacred to the memory of printing, the art preservative of all arts. This was first invented about the year 1440. Inscription on the facade of the house once

occupied by LAURENT KOSTER at Harlem. "The art preservative of all arts,” prob

ably taken from this. He who first shortened the labor of Copyists by device of Movable Types was disbanding hired Armies and cashiering most Kings and Senates, and creating a whole new Democratic world: hé had invented the Art of printing. CARLYLE-Sartor Resartus. Bk. I. Ch. V.

Transforms old print To zigzag manuscript, and cheats the eyes Of gallery critics by a thousand arts. COWPERThe Task. Bk. II. The Time Piece.

L. 363.

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A tuft of evening primroses, O'er which the mind may hover till it dozes;

O'er which it well might take a pleasant sleep,

But that 'tis ever startled by the leap Of buds into ripe flowers.

KEATSI Stood Tiptoe Upon a Little Hill.

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Every school boy and school girl who has arrived at the age of reflection ought to know something about the history of the art of printing. HORACE MANNThe Common School Journal.

February, 1843. Printing and Paper Mak

ing. Though an angel should write, still 'tis devils

must print. MOOREThe Fudge Family in England. Let

ter III.

ter's sway,

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