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The public be damned.
W. H. VANDERBILT's amused retort when

asked whether the public should be con-
sulted about luxury trains. As reported by
CLARENCE DRESSER in Chicago Tribune,
about 1883. See Letter by ASHLEY W.
COLE in N. Y. Times, Aug. 25, 1918.
Also Letter in Herald, Oct. 1, 1918, which
was answered in same, Oct. 28, 1918.

Sævitque animis ignobile vulgus, Jamque faces et saxa volant.

The rude rabble are enraged; now firebrands and stones fly. VERGILÆneid. I. 149.

PUMPKIN 16 I don't know how to tell it—but ef such a thing

could be As the angels wantin' boardin', and they'd call

around on me I'd want to 'commodate 'em-all the whole-in

durin' flockWhen the frost is on the punkin and the fod

der's in the shock. JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY-When the Frost is

on the Punkin.

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And the Creole of Cuba laughs out to behold, Through orange leaves shining the broad spheres

of gold. WHITTIERThe Pumpkin.

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Scinditur incertum studia in contraria vulgus.

The uncertain multitude is divided by opposite opinions. VERGIL-Æneid. II. 39.

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Vox omnibus una.

One cry was common to them all. VERGIL-Æneid. V. 616.

0,-fruit loved of boyhood!—the old days re

calling, When wood-grapes were purpling and brown

nuts were falling! When wild, ugly faces we carved in its skin, Glaring out through the dark with a candle

within! When we laughed round the corn-heap, with

hearts all in tune, Our chair a broad pumpkin, - our lantern the

moon, Telling tales of the fairy who travelled like steam In a pumpkin-shell coach, with two rats for her

team! WHITTIERThe Pumpkin.

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Les préjugés, ami, sont les rois du vulgaire.

Prejudices, friend, govern the vulgar crowd. VOLTAIRE--Le Fanatisme. II. 4.

10 Our supreme governors, the mob. HORACE WALPOLE—Letter to Horace Mann.

Sept. 7, 1743.

PUN (See HUMOR, JESTING, WIT)

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Some have been beaten till they know

Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall What wood a cudgel's of by th' blow:

his blood be shed. Some kick'd until they can feel whether

Genesis. IX. 6. A shoe be Spanish or neat's leather.

BUTLERHudibras. Pt. II. Canto I. L. 221. Something lingering with boiling oil in it 2

something humorous but lingeringFrieth in his own grease.

with either boiling oil or melted lead. CHAUCER—Wife of Bathes Tale. V. 6069. W.S. GILBERT—Mikado.

Prologue. L. 487. MORRIS' ed. HEYWOOD
Proverbs. Pt. I. Ch. XI. ("her" for "his.") My object all sublime
(See also BISMARCK, COTTON)

I shall achieve in time

To let the punishment fit the crime. Noxiæ pæna par esto.

W. S. GILBERT~Mikado. Let the punishment be equal with the offence.

(See also CICERO) CICERODe Legibus. Bk. III. 20. (See also GILBERT)

The wolf must die in his own skin.

HERBERT—Jacula Prudentum. Cavendum est ne major pæna quam culpa sit;

17 et ne iisdem de causis alii plectantur, alii ne

Culpam pæna premit comes. appellentur quidem.

Punishment follows close on crime. Care should be taken that the punishment

HORACECarmina. IV. 5. 24. does not exceed the guilt; and also that some 18 men do not suffer for offenses for which others Ne scutica dignum horribili sectere flagello. are not even indicted:

Do not pursue with the terrible scourge him CICERODe Officiis. I. 23.

who deserves a slight whip.

HORACE—Satires. I. 3. 119. 5 Diis proximus ille est

19 Quem ratio non ira movet: qui factor rependens For whoso spareth the spring (switch) spilleth Consilio punire potest.

his children. He is next to the gods whom reason, and LANGLAND--Piers Ploughman. not passion, impels; and who, after weighing

(See also PROVERBS) the facts, can measure the punishment with discretion.

Breach for breach, eye for eye, tooth for tooth. CLAUDINAUSDe Consulatu Malii Theodori Leviticus. XXIV. 20.

Panegyris. CCXXVII. 6 I stew all night in my own grease.

Quidquid multis peccatur inultum est.

The sins committed by many pass unpunished. COTTON—Virgil Travestie. P. 35. (Ed. 1807) LUCAN-Pharsalia. V. 260.

Fat enough to be stewed in their own liquor. FULLERHoly State and the Profane State. P. 396. (Ed. 1840)

It were better for him that a miilstone were (See also CHAUCER)

hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea.

Luke. XVII. 2. Eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.

The object of punishment is, prevention from Deuteronomy. XIX. 21.

evil; it never can be made impulsive to good. 8

HORACE MANN-Lectures and Reports on Edu'Tis I that call, remember Milo's end,

cation. Lecture VII. Wedged in that timber which he strove to rend. WENTWORTH DILLONEssay on Translated

Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is Verse. Ovid.

not quenched.

Mark. IX. 44. That is the bitterest of all,—to wear the yoke of our own wrong-doing.

Unrespited, unpitied, unrepriev'd. GEORGE ELIOT-Daniel Deronda. Bk. V. MILTONParadise Lost. Bk. II. L. 185.

Ch. XXXVI. 10

Our torments also may in length of time Send them into everlasting Coventry.

Become our elements. EMERSONEssays. Manners. During the MILTONParadise Lost. Bk. II. L. 274.

Civil War in England officers were sent for punishment to the garrison at Coventry.

Back to thy punishment, 11

False fugitive, and to thy speed add wings. Vengeance comes not slowly either upon you MILIONParadise Lost. Bk. II. L. 699. or any other wicked man, but steals silently and imperceptibly, placing its foot on the bad.

Just prophet, let the damn'd one dwell EURIPIDES-Fragment.

Full in the sight of Paradise, 12

Beholding heaven and feeling hell. My punishment is greater than I can bear. MOORE-Lalla Rookh. Fire Worshippers. L. Genesis. IV. 13.

1,028.

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He, who has committed a fault, is to be corrected both by advice and by force, kindly and harshly, and to be made better for himself as well as for another, not without chastisement, but without passion. SENECA--De Ira. I. 14.

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Ay-down to the dust with them, slaves as they

are, From this hour, let the blood in their das

tardly veins, That shrunk at the first touch of Liberty's war,

Be wasted for tyrants, or stagnant in chains. MOORE—Lines on the Entry of the Austrians

into Naples. (1821) Die and be damned. THOMAS MORTIMER—Against the Calvinistic

doctrine of eternal punishment. 3 Æquo animo poenam, qui meruere, ferant.

Let those who have deserved their punishment, bear it patiently. OVIDAmorum. II. 7. 12.

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Maxima est factæ injuriæ pæna, fecisse: nec quisquam gravius adficitur, quam qui ad supplicium pænitentiæ traditur.

The severest punishment a man can receive who has injured another, is to have committed the injury; and no man is more severely punished than he who is subject to the whip of his own repentance. SENECA-De Ira. III. 26.

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Paucite paucarum diffundere crimen in omnes.

Do not lay on the multitude the blame that is due to a few. OVID--Ars Amatoria. III. 9.

5 Estque pati poenas quam meruisse minus.

It is less to suffer punishment than to deserve it. OVIDEpistolae Ex Ponto. I. 1. 62.

Nec ulla major pana nequitiæ est, quam quod sibi et suis displicet.

There is no greater punishment of wickedness than that it is dissatisfied with itself and its deeds. SENECA-Epistolae Ad Lucilium. XLII.

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Sequitur superbos ultor a tergo deus.

An avenging God closely follows the haughty. SENECA-Hercules Furens. 385.

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He that spareth his rod hateth his son.
Proverbs. XIII. 24.

(See also LANGLAND, SKELTON, VENNING) 10 To kiss the rod. History of Reynard the Fox. WILLIAM Cax

TON's trans., printed by him. (1481)
ARBER's English Scholar's Library. Ch. XII.

(See also Two GENTLEMEN OF VERONA) Quod antecedit tempus, maxima venturi supplicii

pars est.

The time that precedes punishment is the severest part of it. SENECA-De Beneficiis. II. 5. Corrigendus est, qui peccet, et admonitione et vi, et molliter et aspere, meliorque tam sibi quam alii faciendus, non sine castigatione, sed sine ira.

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There is nothynge that more dyspleaseth God Than from theyr children to spare the rod. SKELTON---Magnyfycence. L. 1,954.

(See also PROVERBS)

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Punitis ingeniis, gliscit auctoritas.

When men of talents are punished, authority is strengthened. TACITUS-Annales. IV. 35.

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