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14 ... Comme quelqu'un pourroit dire de moy, que j'ay seulement faict icy un amas de fleursestrangieres, n'yayant fourny du mien quele filet à leslier. As one might say of me that I have only made here a collection of other people's flowers, having provided nothing of my own but the cord to bind them together. MonTAIGNE–Essays, Bk. III. Ch. XII. (See also ELIOT) 15 . . . . I have seen books made of things neither studied nor ever understood . . . the author contenting himself for his own part, to have cast the plot and projected the design of it, and by his industry to have bound up the fagot of unknown provisions; at least the ink and paper his own. This may be said to be a buying or borrowing, and not a making or compiling of a book. MontaignE-Essays, Bk. III. Ch. XII. 16 Nor suffers Horace more in wrong translations By wits, than critics in as wrong quotations. Pope—Essay on Criticism. Pt. III. L. 104.

17 He ranged his tropes, and preached up patience, Backed his opinion with quotations. PRIoR—Paulo Purganti and his Wife. L. 143. 18 Always to verify your references. REv. DR. UTH-to Dean Burgon. Nov. 29, 1847. See WERY REv. John BURGoN— Lives of Twenty Good Men. “Reference” in ed. of 1891; “quotation” in earliered.

19

The little honesty existing among authors is to be seen in the outrageous way in which they misquote from the writings of others.

Schope.NHAUER—On Authorship.

20 They had been at a great feast of ianguages,

and stolen the scraps. Love's Labour's Lost. Act W. Sc, 1. L. 39.

21 The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. Merchant of Venice. Act I. Sc. 3. L. 99.

22 A forward critic often dupes us With sham quotations perihupsos, And if we have not read Longinus, Will magisterially outshine us. Then, lest with Greek he over-run ye, Procure the book for love or money, Translated from Boileau's translation, And quote quotation on quotation. Swift–On Poetry.

23 I am but a gatherer and disposer of other men's stuff. SIR HENRY Wotton—Preface to the Elements of Architecture.

24 To patchwork learn'd quotations are allied, Both strive to make our poverty our pride. YoUNG—Love of Fame. Satire I. 25 Some, for renown, on scraps of learning dote, And think they grow immortal as they quote. YouNg–Lone of Fame. Satire I. L. 89.

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Nor trusts the gorgeous sky. Quoth the Raven “Nevermore!” KEBLE–Christian Year. (25th Sunday after PoE–The Raven. St.8.

Trinity.) On the Rainbow. 1. A rainbow in the morning Is the Shepherd's warning; But a rainbow at night Is the Shepherd's delight. Old Weather Rhyme.

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8 The Raven's house is built with reeds,Sing woe, and alas is me! And the Raven's couch is spread with weeds, High on the hollow tree; And the Raven himself, telling his beads In penance for his past misdeeds, Upon the top I see. THos. DARcy McGEE-The Penitent Raven. 9. The raven once in snowy plumes was drest, White as the whitest dove's unsullied breast, Fair as the guardian of the Capitol, Soft as the swan; a large and lovely fowl His tongue, his prating tongue had changed him quite To sooty blackness from the purest white. OvID–Metamorphoses. Story of Coronis. ADDISON's trans.

11
And the Raven, never flitting,
Still is sitting, still is sitting

On the pallid bust of Pallas
Just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming
o: o: #. is o

nd the lamplight o'er him streaming

Throws his shadow on the floor,

And my soul from out that shadow,
That lies floating on the floor,

hall be lifted—nevermore.

PoE-The Raven. St. 18.

12 The croakingraven doth bellow for revenge. Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 264.

13 The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements.

Macbeth. Act I. Sc. 5. L. 40.

14 O, it comes o'er my memory, As doth the raven o'er the infected house, Boding to all.

Othello. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 20.

15 Did ever raven sing so like a lark, That gives sweet tidings of the sun's uprise?

Titus Andronicus. Act III. Sc. 1. L. 158.

16 READING

Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body. As by the one, health is preserved, strengthened, and invigorated: by the other, virtue (which is the health of the mind) is kept alive, cherished, and confirmed.

ADDISON.—The Tatler. No. 147.

17 Reading maketh a full man. Bacon—Of Studies.

18 Read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest. Book of Common Prayer. 3. for the Second Sunday in Advent. 19 In science, read, by preference, the newest works; in literature, the oldest. The classic literature is always modern. BULwFR-LYTTON.—Cartoniana. Hintson Mental Culture.

20 If time is precious, no book that will not ino by repeated readings deserves to be read at all. CARLYLE-Essays. Goethe's Helena.

21 We have not read an author till we have seen

his object, whatever it may be, as he saw it. CARLYLE–Essays. Goethe's H

22

The mind, relaxing into needful sport,

Should turn to writers of an abler sort,

Whose wit well managed, and whose classic style,

Give truth a lustre, and make wisdom smile.
CowPER—Retirement. L. 715.

10

Ghastly, grim, and ancient Raven, wandering from the Nightly shore,

Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!

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