Page images
PDF
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

That he that readeth it may run over it.
Rendering in the Vulgate.
(See also CowPER, TENNYSON)

12 Books have always a secret influence on the understanding; we cannot at pleasure obliterate ideas: he that reads books of science, though without any desire fixed of improvement, will grow more knowing; he that entertains himself with moral or religious treatises, will imperceptibly advance in goodness; the ideas which are often offered to the mind, will at last find a !. moment when it is disposed to receive them. SAMUEL Johnson–The Adventurer. No. 137. 13 A man ought to read just as inclination leads him; for what he reads as a task will do him little good. SAMUEL Johnson—Boswell's Life of Johnson. (1763)

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Crude or intoxicate, collecting toys

And trifles for choice matters, worth a sponge,

As children gathering pebbles on the shore. MILTON.—Paradise Regained. Bk. IV. L. 322.

1 He that I am reading seems always to have

the most force. MontaignE–Apology for Raimond Sebond

2 And better had they ne'er been born, Who read to doubt, or read to scorn.

Scott—The Monastery. Ch. XII.

3 He hath never fed of the dainties that are bred in a book; he hath not eat paper, as it were; he hath not drunk ink: his intellect is not replenished; he is only an animal, only sensible in the duller parts. Love's Labour's Lost. Act IV. Sc. 2. L. 26. 4. Read Homer once, and you can read no more, For all books else appear so mean, so poor, Verse will seem prose; but still persist to read, And Homer will be all the books you need. John SHEFFIELD (Duke of Buckinghamshire) —An Essay on Poetry. L. 323.

[blocks in formation]

Compelling eyes and footsteps. Memory yields, Yet clings with loving check, and shines anew, Reflecting all the rays of that bright lamp Our angel Reason holds. We had not walked But for Tradition; we walk evermore To higher paths by brightening Reason's lamp. GEoRGE ELIOT-Spanish Gypsy. Bk. II. 13 Reasons are not like garments, the worse for wearing. EARL of Essex to Lord Willoughby. Jan. 4, 1598–9. 14 Setting themselves against reason, as often as reason is against them. HoBBEs—Works. III. P. 91. Ed. 1839. Also in Epistle Dedicatory to Tripos. IV. XIII. 15 Hoc volo, sic jubeo, sit pro ratione voluntas. I will it, I so order, let my will stand for a reason. JUVENAL–Satires. VI. 223. 16 You have ravished me away by a Power I cannot resist; and yet I could resist till I saw you; and even since I have seen you I have endeavored often “to reason against the reasons of my Love.” KEATs—Letters to Fanny Braune. VIII.

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

9. Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus’d.

Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 4. L. 36.

10

Give you a reason on compulsion! if reasons were as plentiful as blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I.

Henry IV. Pt. I. Act II. Sc. 4. L. 263.

11 Good reasons must, of force, give place to better.

Julius Caesar. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 203.

12 But since the affairs of men rest still incertain, Let's reason with the worst that may befall.

Julius Caesar. Act W. Sc. 1. L. 96.

13 Strong reasons make strong actions. King John. Act III. Sc. 4. L. 182.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

22 I do not mean to be disrespectful, but the attempt of the Lords to stop the progress of reform, reminds me very forcibly of the great storm of Sidmouth, and of the conduct of the excellent Mrs. Partington on that occasion. In the winter of 1824, there set in a great flood upon that town—the tide rose to an incredible height: the waves rushed in upon the houses, and everything was threatened with destruction. In the midst of this sublime and terrible storm, Dame Partington, who lived upon the beach, was seen at the door of her house with mop and pattens, trundling her mop, squeezing out the sea water, and vigorously pushing away the Atlantic Ocean. The Atlantic was roused. Mrs. Partington's spirit was up; but I need not tell you that the contest was unequal. The Atlantic Ocean beat Mrs. Partington. She was excellent at a sloporapuddle, but she should not havemeddled with a tempest. SYDNEY SMITH-Speech at Tuunton. Oct., 1831.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »