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1. What point of morals, of manners, of economy, of philosophy, of religion, of taste, of the conduct of life, has he not settled? What mystery has he not signified his knowledge of? What office, or function, or district of man's work, has he not remembered? What king has he not taught state, as Talma taught Napoleon? What maiden has not found him finer than her delicacy? What lover has he not outloved? What sage has he not outseen? What gentleman has he not instructed in the rudeness of his behavior? EMERSON.—Representative Men. Shakespeare.

2 Now you who rhyme, and I who rhyme, Have not we sworn it, many a time, That we no more our verse would scrawl, For Shakespeare he had said it all! R. W. GILDER—The Modern Rhymer.

3 If we wish to know the force of human genius we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning we may study his commentators. HAZLITT–Table Talk. On the Ignorance of the Learned.

4 Mellifluous Shakespeare, whose enchanting Quill Commandeth Mirth or Passion, was but Will.

THoMAs HEywood—Hierarchie of the Blessed

Angels.

5

The stream of Time, which is continually washing the dissoluble fabrics of other poets, passes without injury by the adamant of Shaks

pere. SAMUEL Johnson—Preface to Works of Shakspere.

6

I remember, the § ers have often mentioned

it as an honour to S espeare, that in his writ

ing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out

a line. My answer hath been, would he had blot

ted a thousand. BEN Jonson–Discoveries. De Shakespeare

nostrat.

7
This figure that thou here seest put,
It was for gentle Shakespeare cut,
Wherein the graver had a strife
With Nature, to outdo the life:
Oh, could he but have drawn his wit
As well in brass, as he has hit
His face, the print would then surpass
All that was ever writ in brass;
But since he cannot, reader, look
Not on his picture, but his book.

BEN Jonson–Lines on a Picture of Shakes

peare.

8
He was not of an age, but for all time!
And all the Muses still were in their prime,
When, like Apollo, he came forth to warm
Our ears, or like a Mercury to charm!

BEN Jonson–Lines to the Memory of Shakes

peare.

9. Nature herself was proud of his designs, And joyed to wear the dressing of his lines!

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