Page images
PDF
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]
[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

SLANDER (See also GossIP, SCANDAL) 14 There are * * * robberies that leave man or woman forever beggared of peace and joy, yet kept secret by the sufferer. GEORGE ELIOT-Felix Holt. Introduction.

15 I hate the man who builds his name On ruins of another's fame. GAY-The Poet and the Rose. 16 A generous heart repairs a slanderous tongue. HomeR–0dyssey. Bk. VIII. L. 43. Pope's trans.

17 If slander be a snake, it is a winged one—it flies as well as creeps. Douglas JERRoLD—Specimens of Jerrold's Wit. Slander.

18 Where it concerns himself, Who's angry at a slander, makes it true. BEN Jonson–Catiline. Act III. Sc. 1.

19 Cut Men's throats with whisperings. BEN JoNSON.—Sejanus. Act I. Sc. 1. 20 For enemies carry about slander not in the form in which it took its rise. * * * The scandal of men is everlasting; even then does it survive when you would suppose it to be dead. PLAUTUs—Persa. Act # . Sc. 1. RILEY's trans. 21 Homines qui gestant, quique auscultant crimina, Simeo arbitratu liceat, omnes locant Gestores linguis, auditores auribus. Your tittle-tattlers, and those who listen to slander, by my good will should all be hanged —the former by their tongues, the latter by the ears. PLAUTUs—Pseudolus. I. 5. 12.

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

13 Fit in dominatu servitus, in servitute dominatus. He is sometimes slave who should be master; and sometimes master who should be slave. CICERO-Oratio Pro Rege Deiotaro. XI.

14 I would not have a slave to till my ground, To carry me, to fan me while I sleep, And tremble when I wake, for all the wealth That sinews bought and sold have ever earn'd. CowPER—Task. Bk. II. L. 29.

15 Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. CowPER—Task. Bk. II. L. 40. (See also CAMPBELL) 16 I do not see how a barbarous community and a civilized community can constitute a state. I think we must get rid of slavery or we must get rid of freedom. EMERSON.—The Assault upon Mr. Sumner's Speech. May 26, 1856. 17 Corrupted freemen are the worst of slaves. DAVID GARRICK–Prologue to Ed. MooRE's Gamesters.

18 Resolved, That the compact which exists between the North and the South is a covenant with death and an agreement with hell; involvi ing both parties in atrocious criminality, and should be immediately annulled. WM. LLoyd GARRison—Adopted by the Mass. Anti-Slavery Society. Fanueil Hall. Jan. 27, 1843. 19 The man who#. me employment, which I must have or suffer, that man is my master, let me call him what I will. HENRY GEORGE–Social Problems. Ch. V. 20 The very mudsills of society. * * * We call them slaves. * * * But I will not characterize that class at the North with that term; but you have it. It is there, it is everywhere, it is eternal. JAMEs H. HAMMOND–Speech in the U. S. Senate. March, 1858.

21 Cotton is King. JAMEs H. HAMMOND. Phrase used in the Senate, March, 1858. Gov. MANNING of South Carolina, Speech at Columbia, S. C.

(*) (See also Christy)

22 Whatever day

Makes man a slave, takes half his worth away.

HoMER—Odyssey. Bk. XVII. L. 392. Pope's trans.

23 I believe this government cannot endure per

manently half slave and half free. ABRAHAM LINcoLN—Speech. June 17, 1858. 24 In giving freedom to the slave we assure free

dom to the free-honorable alike in what we

give and what we preserve. ABRAHAM LINcoLN—Annual Message to Con

gress. Dec. 1, 1862.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]
« PreviousContinue »