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1 An ounce of enterprise is worth a pound of

privilege. FREDERIC R. MARVIN–Companionship of 2 Books. P. 318.

Mon verre n'est pas grand, mais je bois dans mon Verre. My glass is not large, but I drink from my

glass. ALFRED DE MUSSEt.

3 Worth makes the man, and want of it the fellow; The rest is all but leather and prunello.

Pope—Essay on Man. Epistle IV. 203.

4 I would that I were low laid in my grave; I am not worth this coil that's made for me

Ring John. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 164.

5 I have been worth the whistle. O Goneril. You are not worth the dust which the rude wind Blows in your face. King Lear. Act IV. Sc. 2. L. 27. 6 (See also FRANKLIN)

Let there be some more test made of my metal,
Before so noble and so great a figure
Be stamped upon it.
Measure for Measure. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 49.
(See also WycHERLEY under MAN)

O, how thy worth with manners may I sing,
When thou art all the better part of me?
What can mine own praise to mine own self bring?
And what is't but mine own when I praise
thee?
Sonnet XXXIX.

8 A pilot's part in calms cannot be o, In dangerous times true worth is only tri’d. STIRLING—Doomes—day. The Fifth Houre.

9

It is a maxim, that those to whom everybody allows the second place have an undoubted title to the first.

SwiFT-Tale of a Tub. Dedication.

10 All human things Of dearest value hang on slender strings. EDMUND WALLER—Miscellanies. I. L. 163. 11 But though that place I never gain, Herein lies comfort for my pain: I will be worthy of it. o, WHEELER WILCOx—I Will be Worthy of It. 12

It is easy enough to be prudent,
When nothing tempts you to stray;

When without or within no voice of sin
Is luring your soul away;

But it's only a negative virtue
Until it is tried by fire,

And the life that is worth the honor of earth,
Is the one that resists desire.
ELLA WHEELER WILCOx—Worth While.
13

Siempre acostumbra hacer el vulgo necio,

De le bueno y lo malo igual aprecio.

The foolish and vulgar are always accus

tomed to value equally the good and the bad. YRIARTE–Fables, §§

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16 La blessure est pour vous, la douleur estpour Inol. The wound is for you, but the pain is forme. CHARLEs DK. to LIGNY, who was fatally wounded in the massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day. 17 Tempore ducetur longo fortasse cicatrix; Horrent admotas vulnera cruda manus. A wound will perhaps become tolerable with length of time; but wounds which are raw shudder at the touch of the hands. OvID—Epistolae Ez Ponto. I. 3. 15. 18 Saucius ejurat pugnam gladiator, et idem Immemor antiqui vulneris arma capit. The wounded gladiator forswears all fighting, but soon forgetting his former wound resumes his arms. OvID—Epistolae Ez Ponto. I. 5. 37.

19 Thou hast wounded the spirit that loved thee And cherish'd thine image for years; Thou hast taught me at last to forget thee, In secret, in silence, and tears. MRs. DAVID PortBR-Thou Hast Wounded the Spirit.

20 Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor, poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me. Julius Caesar. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 229.

21 Safe in a ditch he bides,

With twenty trenched gashes on his head;

The least a death to nature.
Macbeth. Act III. Sc. 4. L. 26.

22 What wound did ever heal but by degrees? Othello. Act II. Sc. 3. L. 377.

23 He in peace is wounded, not in war. The Rape of Lucrece. L. 831.

24 He jests at scars that never felt a wound. Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 1.

25

The wound of peace is surety,

Surety secure.
Troilus and Cressida. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 14.

26 The o wound is deepest: O time most accurs' 'Mongst all foes that a friend should be the worst. Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act V. Sc.4. L.71.

27 Ah me! we wound where we never intended to strike; we create anger where we never meant

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12

Youth is to all the glad season of life; but often only by what it hopes, not by what it attains, or what it escapes.

CARLYLE-Essays. Schiller.

13 As I approve of a youth that has something of the old man in him, so I am no less pleased with an old man that has something of the youth. He that follows this rule may be old in body, but can never be so in mind. CICERo-Cato; or, An Essay on Old Age. 14 Prima commendiato proficiscitur a modestia tumpietate in parentes, tum insuos benevolentia. The chief recommendation [in a young man] is modesty, then dutiful conduct toward parents, then affection for kindred. CICERo-De Officiis. II. 13. 15 Teneris, heu, lubrica moribus aetas! Alas! the slippery nature of tender youth. CLAUDIANUs—De Raptu Proserpinae. III. 227

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1 The spirit of a §. 13 That means to be of note, begins betimes. What is that to him that reaps not harvest of his

Antony and Cleopatra. Act IV. Sc. 4. L. 26.

2 The chariest maid is prodigal enough, If she unmask her beauty to the moon; Virtue itself 'scapes not calumnious strokes. The canker galls the infants of the spring, Too oft before their buttons be disclosed; And in the morn and liquid dew of youth, Contagious blastments are most imminent. Hamlet. Act I. Sc. 3. L. 36. “Infants of the spring” found also in Love's Labour's Lost. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 100.

2 For youth no less becomes The light and careless livery that it wears, Than settled age his sables, and his weeds Importing health and graveness.

Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 7. L. 79.

4 Is in the very May-morn of his youth, Ripe for exploits and mighty enterprises.

enry V. Act I. Sc. 2. L. 120.

5 He that is more than a youth, is not for me, and he that is less than man, I am not for him. Ms. Ado About Nothing. Act II. Sc. 1. L.

6 Crabbed age and youth cannot live together; Youth is full of pleasance, age is full of care; Youth like summermorn, age like winter weather; Youth like summer brave, age like winter bare. Youth is full of sport, age's breath is short; Youth is nimble, age is lame; Youth is hot and bold, age is weak and cold; Youth is wild, and age is tame. Age, I do abhor thee; youth I do adore thee. The Passionate Pilgrim. St. 12.

7 Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime: So thou through windows of thine age shall see, Despite of wrinkles this thy golden time. Sonnet III.

8 Hail, blooming Youth! May all your virtues with your o improve, Till in consummate worth you shine the pride Of these our days, and succeeding times A bright example.

WM. SoMERVILLE-The Chase. Bk. III. L.

389.

9

Age may have one side, but assuredly Youth has the other. There is nothing more certain than that both are right, except perhaps that both are wrong.

STEVENSoN–Crabbed Age.

10

For God's sake give me the young man who

has brains enough to make a fool of hi STEvenson—Crabbed Age.

11 Youth is wholly experimental. STEVENSoN—To a Young Gentleman.

12 Youth should be a savings-bank. MADAME SwetchinE.

youthful joys, Though the deep heart of existence beat forever like a boy's? TENNYSON.—Locksley Hall. St. 70.

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