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19 To-day is not yesterday: we ourselves change; how can our Works and Thoughts, if they are always to be the fittest, continue always the same? § indeed, is painful; yet ever needful; and if Memory have its force and worth, so also has Hope. CARLYLE-Essays. Characteristics. 20 Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis. Astra regunt homines, sed regit astra Deus. Times change and we change with them. The stars rule men but God rules the stars. CELLARIUs—Harmonia Macrocosmica. (1661) The phrase “Tempora mutantur” or “Omnia mutantur” attributed by BoRBoNIUs to EMPEROR LOTHARIUs I, in Delitiae Poetarum Germanorum. CICERODe Officiis. Bk. I. Ch. 10. OvID—Melamor. Bk. III. 397. LACTANTIUS. Bk. III. Fable V. HolinsHED–Description of Great Britain. (1571)

21 Sancho Panza by name is my own self, if I

was not changed in my cradle. CERVANTEs—Don Quixote. Pt. J. Ch. XXX.

22 An id exploratum cuiquam potest esse, quomodo sese habitarum sit corpus, non dico ad annum sed ad vesperam? Can any one find out in what condition his body will be, I do not say a year hence, but this evening? Co-D. Finibus Bonorum et Malorum. II.

23 Non tam commutandarum, quam evertendarum rerum cupidi.

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I do not allow to suppose that either the convention or the League, have concluded to decide that I am either the greatest or the best man in America, but rather they have concluded it is not best to swap horses while crossing the river, and have further concluded that, I am not so poor a horse that they might not make a botch of it in trying to swap.

LINcoLN, to a delegation of the National

Union League who congratulated him on

his nomination as the Republican candidate for President, June 9, 1864. As given by J. F. RHoDEs Hist. of the U. S. from the Compromise of 1850. Vol. IV. P. 370. Same in Nicolay AND HAY Lincoln's Complete Works. Vol. II. P. 532. Different version in Appleton's Cyclopedia. RAYMOND —Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln. Ch. XVIII. P. 500. (Ed. 1865) says Lincoln quotes an old Dutch farmer, “It was best not to swap horses when crossing a stream.”

4. All things must change To something new, to something strange. LoNGFELLow–Kéramos. L. 32.

5 But the nearer the dawn the darker the night, And by going wrong all things come right; Things have been mended that were worse, And the worse, the nearer they are to mend. LoNGFELLow—Tales of a Wayside Inn. The Baron of St. Castine. L. 265.

6 Omnia mortali mutantur lege creata, Nec secognoscunt terrae vertentibus annis, Et mutant variam faciem per socula gentes. Everything that is created is changed by the laws of man; the earth does not know itself in the revolution of years; even the races of man assume various forms in the course of

ages. MANILIUs—Astronomica. 515.

7 Do not think that years leave us and find us the same! Owen MEREDITH (Lord Lytton)—Lucile. Pt. II. Canto II. St. 3.

8 Weary the cloud falleth out of the sky, Dreary the leaf lieth low. All o must come to the earth by and by, Out of which all thingso Owen MEREDITH (Lord Lytton)—The Wanderer. Earth's Havings. Bk. III.

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There is so much good in the worst of us, And so much bad in the best of us, That it ill behoves any of us To find fault with the rest of us. Sometimes quoted “To talk about the rest of us.” Author not found. Attributed to R. L. STEVENSON, not found. Lloyd Osborne, his literary executor, states he did not write it. Claimed for Governor Hoch of Kansas, in The Reader, Sept. 7, 1907, but authorship denied by him. Accredited to ELLEN THoRNEYCROFT FowlFR, who denies writing it. Claimed also for ELBERT HUBBARD. (See also MILLER, STRINGER)

10 They love, they hate, but cannot do without him.

ARIsroPHANEs. See PLUTARCH-Life of Alcibiades. LANGHORNE's trans. (See also MARTIAL; also ADDISON, under LovE)

11 In brief, I don't stick to declare, Father Dick, So they call him for short, is a regular brick; A metaphor taken—I have not the page aright— From an ethical work by the Stagyrite. BARHAM—Brothers of Burchington. Nicomachean Ethics, section I, records Aristotle's definition of a happy man, a four cornered, perfectly rectangular man, a faultless cube. (“A perfect brick.”) (See also Lycurgas)

12

Chevalier sans peur et sans reproche.
Knight without fear and without reproach.
Applied to CHEvaLIER BAYARD.

13 Zealous, yet modest; innocent, though free; Patient of toil; serene amidst alarms; Inflexible in faith; invincible in arms. BEATTIE–The Minstrel. Bk. I. St. 11.

14 Many men are mere warehouses full of merchandise—the head, the heart, are stuffed with . * * * There are apartments in their souls which were once tenanted by taste, and love, and joy, and worship, but they are all deserted now, and the rooms are filled with earthy and material things. HENRY WARD BEECHER—Life Thoughts. .

15 Many men build as cathedrals were built, the part nearest the ground finished; but that which soars toward heaven, the turrets and the spires, forever incomplete. HENRY WARD BEECHER—Life Thoughts.

16 Most men are bad. Attributed to BIAs of Priene.

17 Une grande incapacité inconnue. A great o: incapacity. BISMARCK, of Napoleon III., while Minister to Paris in 1862.

18 I look upon you as a gem of the old rock. SIR THOMAS BRowNE—Dedication to Urn Burial. (See also BULLEN, BURKE)

19

No, when the fight begins within himself,

A man's worth something.
Robert BRowNING—Men and Women. Bish-

op Blougram's Apology.

20 Your father used to come home to my mother, and why may not I be a chippe of the same block out of which you two were cutte? BULLEN's Old Plays. II. 60. Dick of Devonshire. (See also BRowNE) 21 Are you a bromide? GELETT BURGEss—Title of Essay. First pub. in Smart Set, April, 1906.

22 All men that are ruined, are ruined on the side

of their natural propensities. BURRE–Letters. Letter I. On a Regicide Peace.

23 He was not merely a chip of the old Block, but the old Block itself. BURKE—About Wm. Pitt—Wraxall's Memoirs. Vol. II. P. 342. (See also BRowNE)

24

From their folded mates they wander far,
Their ways seem harsh and wild:

They follow the beck of a baleful star,
Their paths are dream-beguiled.
RICHARD BURTON.—Black Sheep.

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