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1 Every one is as God made him, and often a Hannibal, as he had mighty virtues, so had he É. deal worse. . vices; * * * he had two distinct persons vaNTEs—Don Quixote. XI. 5. In nun. 14 BURTON.—Anatomy of Melancholy. Democritus He was a verray perfight gentil knight. to the Reader. con-canow %. Prologue. L.

2

Heroic, stoic Cato, the sententious,

Who lent his lady to his friend Hortensius.
BYRON-Don Juan. Canto WI. St. 7.

3
So well she acted all and every part
By turns—with that vivacious versatility,
Which many people take for want of heart.
They err–’tis merely what is call'd mobility,
A thing of temperament and not of art,
Though seeming so, from its supposed facility;
And false—though true; for surely they're sin-
cerest
Who are strongly acted on by what is nearest.
BYRON-Don Juan. Canto XVI. St. 97.

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With more capacity for love than earth
Bestows on most of mortal mould and birth,
His early dreams of good out-stripp'd the truth,
And troubled manhood follow'd baffled youth.
BYRON-Lara. Canto I. St. 18.

5
Genteel in personage,
Conduct, and equipage;
Noble by heritage,
Generous and free.
HENRY CAREy—The Contrivances. Act I.
Sc. 2. L. 22.

6 Clever men are good, but they are not the best. CARLYLE–Goethe. Edinburgh Review. (1828)

7 We are firm believers in the maxim that, for all right judgment of any man or thing, it is useful, nay, essential, to see his good qualities before pronouncing on his bad. CARLYLE—Essays. Goethe.

8
It is in general more profitable to reckon up

our defects than to boast of our attainments.
CARLYLE–Essays. Signs of the Times.

9 It can be said of him, When he departed he took a Man's life with him. No sounder piece of British manhood was put together in that eighteenth century of Time. CARLYLE–Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review. (1838)

10
Thou art a cat, and rat, and a coward to boot.
CERVANTEs—Don Quixote. Pt. I. Bk. III.
Ch. VIII.

11 Every one is the son of his own works. CERVANTES-Don Quixote. Pt. I. Bk. IV. Ch. XX. 12 I can look sharp as well as another, and let me alone to keep the cobwebs out of my eyes. CERVANTEs Don Quizole. Pt. II. Ch. XXXIII. 13 Cada uno es come Dios le hijo, y aun peor muchas vezes.

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1 That I incline to hope rather than fear, Men look to the East for the dawning things, And gladly banish squint suspicion. for the light of a rising sun MILTON.—Comus. L. 410. But they look to the West, to the crimson West, 12 for the things that are done, are done. Quips and Cranks and wanton Wiles, Douglas MALLoch–East and West. N|. and Becks and wreathèd Smiles.

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7 Who knows nothing base, Fears nothing known. Owen MEREDITH (Lord Lytton)—A Great Man. St. 8. 8 Sae true his heart, sae smooth his speech, His breath like caller air, His very foot has music in 't, As he comes up the stair. W. J. MICKLE–Ballad of Cumnor Hall. Mariner's Wife. Attributed also to JEAN ADAM, evidence in favor of Mickle. Claimed also for McPHERson as a MS. copy was found among his papers after his death. 9 In men whom men condemn as ill I find so much of goodness still, In men whom men pronounce divine I find so much of sin and blot I do not dare to draw a line Between the two, where God has not. JoAQUIN MILLER—Byron. St. 1. (Bear ed. o,* “I hesitate” to “I do not (See also first quotation under topic)

10 He that has light within his own clear breast May sit i' the centre, and enjoy bright day: But he that hides a dark soul and foul thoughts Benighted walks under the mid-day sun; Himself his own dungeon. MILTON.—Comus. L. 381.

11 Yet, where an equal poise of hope and fear Does arbitrate the event, my nature is

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22 Video meliora proboque, Deteriora sequor. I see and approve better things, I follow the worse. OvID—Meta hoses. VII. 20. Same in PETRARCH-To Laura in Life. XXI. 23 Every man has at times in his mind the ideal of what he should be, but is not. This ideal may be high and complete, or it may be quite low and insufficient; yet in all men that really seek to improve, it is better than the actual character. * * * Man never falls so low that he can see nothing higher than himself. THEODoRE PARKER—Critical and Miscellao Writings. Essay I. A Lesson for the ty.

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