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In South Africa the greatest conquests have been made. In Cape Colony, Kaffirland, Griqualand, Basutuland, Natal, Transvaal region, Namaquas, the Matebele, and Bechuana tribes, are 450 foreign labourers, and 90 native ministers, with a large number of lay agents. There are about 40,000 communicants in the churches, and over 45,000 children in the schools.

The mission to Abyssinia has been twice broken up. In Egypt the most prosperous mission belongs to the American United Presbyterians, whose labours are largely among the Copts. They have eight stations, six foreign and two ordained native ministers, 596 communicants, and in the different schools 1,170 children.

Still more marked has been the religious revolution that has taken place in MADAGASCAR. In 1825 there were very few converts. The field then had been occupied only six years. Now the whole land is open to the missionary; idolatry is overthrown; and Christianity is proclaimed to be the religion of the people. In the churches gathered by the London Missionary Society, according to the last report, are 63,896. The Propagation Society, the Norwegian Missionary Society, and the Society of Friends, are labouring at different centres.

In the island of Mauritius, and principally among the coolies from Bengal and Southern India, the Episcopal Church of England is labouring, through its two leading institutions. The membership reported is 333. In these two islands-Madagascar and Mauritius-are 65 missionaries, 292 native ministers, and 65,000 communicants.

Asia. In 1825, it is said, there were missionaries in only three distinct fields, -Syria, India and Ceylon, and the Indian Archipelago. Now in Western, Central, and Eastern TURKEY, the American Board has strong and prosperous missions. The Church Missionary Society is labouring in Pal. estine ; the Jewish and some smaller British and Continental Societies are also at work at different points. In Syria, the Presbyterian Board, the American United Presbyterian Church, &c., are endeavouring to reach the people with the Gospel. There are over 5,000 communicants gathered into churches, which are receiving steady accessions from the corrupt sects of from Mussulmans.

From Turkey we pass over into Persia, and find a people akin to the Turks in their religion. Besides our own mission, the Church Missionary Society has a labourer at Ispahan, who has baptized several converts. Some of the churches have reached self-support. The number enrolled in the different organizations is over 800.

INDIA, To-day the missionary work is carried on in India and Ceylon by 35 missionary societies, besides local agencies. In the different Presidencies are 500 ordained missionaries, occupying more than 400 stations, and over 2,000 sub-stations, the latter chiefly manned by native labourers. The statistical tables that have been prepared for each decade in the last thirty years, show some of the gathered fruits of the work. These returns take in India, Ceylon, and Burmah, and are for the years 1852, 1862, 1872. Placing them together, we have the following :

Native Christians. Communicants. 1852

128,000

22,400 1862

213,182

49,688 1872

318,363

78,494 The successes of the last year or two are proportionately much greater. The additions to the churches for 1874-75 were over 7,000, and the relative gain to Christianity is proportionately larger than to either Hindooism or Mohammedanism. Thus the growth in the Madras Presidency of the three great religions has been, since 1856-Christians, 51 per cent, increase ; Mohammedans, 33; Hindoos, 37. Education in India has greatly improved. There has been a wonderful increase in the productions of the Press.

These results of missionary labour are great and wonderful, but other changes, through the pressure of Christian sentiment and the power of truth, have taken place. In 1825, the Government abetted idolatry, and sought no alliance with Christianity. It husbanded the endowments of temples and mosques ; it supplied funds from its treasury for repairing temples and roads to sacred places ; it taxed pilgrims, and endowed schools for the teaching of error and superstition. Then infanticide abounded ; suttees flourished; bloody rites were practised. Then no Christian convert could obtain his rights in regard to property. These and kindred evils existed. Now all is changed. Government protects and aids missionary operations ; it has cut itself loose from all connection with idolatry; infanticide is declared a criminal act; suttee is prohibited ; and cruel rites have been forbidden. The Koran and the Ganges water are banished from the courts of justice. Converts are protected in their rights, and the legal validity of widows re-marrying is proclaimed. Hindooism is losing its hold upon the many, and the idea is growing that it must disappear under the power of Christianity. There is an enlarging circle that has broken with Brahmanism, though not yet yielding openly to the religion of Jesus. Signs of improvement-material, social, intellectual, and moral—fill the land.

In South Africa the greatest conquests have been made. In Cape Colony, Kaffirland, Griqualand, Basutuland, Natal, Transvaal region, Namaquas, the Matebele, and Bechuana tribes, are 450 foreign labourers, and 90 native ministers, with a large number of lay agents. There are about 40,000 communicants in the churches, and over 45,000 children in the schools.

The mission to Abyssinia has been twice broken up. In Egypt the most prosperous mission belongs to the American United Presbyterians, whose labours are largely among the Copts. They have eight stations, six foreign and two ordained native ministers, 596 communicants, and in the different schools 1,170 children.

Still more marked has been the religious revolution that has taken place in MADAGASCAR. In 1825 there were very few converts. The field then had been occupied only six years. Now the whole land is open to the missionary ; idolatry is overthrown; and Christianity is proclaimed to be the religion of the people. In the churches gathered by the London Missionary Society, according to the last report, are 63,896. The Propagation Society, the Norwegian Missionary Society, and the Society of Friends, are labouring at different centres.

In the island of Mauritius, and principally among the coolies from Bengal and Southern India, the Episcopal Church of England is labouring, through its two leading institutions. The membership reported is 333. In these two islands—Madagascar and Mauritius—are 65 missionaries, 292 native ministers, and 65,000 communicants.

Asia. In 1825, it is said, there were missionaries in only three distinct fields, -Syria, India and Ceylon, and the Indian Archipelago. Now in Western, Central, and Eastern TURKEY, the American Board has strong and prosperous missions. The Church Missionary Society is labouring in Palestine ; the Jewish and some smaller British and Continental Societies are also at work at different points. In Syria, the Presbyterian Board, the American United Presbyterian Church, &c., are endeavouring to reach the people with the Gospel. There are over 5,000 communicants gathered into churches, which are receiving steady accessions from the corrupt sects or from Mussulmans.

From Turkey we pass over into PERSIA, and find a people akin to the Turks in their religion. Besides our own mission, the Church Missionary Society has a labourer at Ispahan, who has baptized several converts. Some of the churches have reached self-support. The number enrolled in the different organizations is over 800.

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INDIA. To-day the missionary work is carried on in India and Ceylon by 35 missionary societies, besides local agencies. In the different Presidencies are 500 ordained missionaries, occupying more than 400 stations, and over 2,000 sub-stations, the latter chiefly manned by native labourers. The statistical tables that have been prepared for each decade in the last thirty years, show some of the gathered fruits of the work. These returns take in India, Ceylon, and Burmah, and are for the years 1852, 1862, 1872. Placing them together, we have the following:

Native Christians. Communicants. 1852

128,000

22,400 1862

213,182

49,688 1872

318,363

78,494 The successes of the last year or two are proportionately much greater. The additions to the churches for 1874-75 were over 7,000, and the relative gain to Christianity is proportionately larger than to either Hindooism or Mohammedanism. Thus the growth in the Madras Presidency of the three great religions has been, since 1856-Christians, 51 per cent. increase ; Mohammedans, 33; Hindoos, 37. Education in India has greatly improved. There has been a wonderful increase in the productions of the Press.

These results of missionary labour are great and wonderful, but other changes, through the pressure of Christian sentiment and the power of truth, have taken place. In 1825, the Government abetted idolatry, and sought no alliance with Christianity. It husbanded the endowments of temples and mosques ; it supplied funds from its treasury for repairing temples and roads to sacred places ; it taxed pilgrims, and endowed schools for the teaching of error and superstition. Then infanticide abounded; suttees flourished; bloody rites were practised. Then no Christian convert could obtain his rights in regard to property. These and kindred evils existed. Now all is changed. Government protects and aids missionary operations ; it has cut itself loose from all connection with idolatry; infanticide is declared a criminal act; suttee is prohibited ; and cruel rites have been forbidden. The Koran and the Ganges water are banished from the courts of justice. Converts are protected in their rights, and the legal validity of widows re-marrying is proclaimed. Hindooism is losing its hold upon the many, and the idea is growing that it must disappear under the power of Christianity. There is an enlarging circle that has broken with Brahmanism, though not yet yielding openly to the religion of Jesus. Signs of improvement-material, social, intellectual, and moral—fill the land. The

natives are awakening from the sleep of ages ; the desire for sound knov. ledge is growing. Caste is relaxing. Stereotyped customs that have been more powerful than law are disappearing. A knowledge of the Bible is spreading, its precepts are becoming more influential, and the truth is working wonders among the Aboriginez, who never yielded to Hindoo or Mohammedan influence, but are now accepting joyfully the doctrines of the Cross. Christianity has obtained a firm footing; its ambassadors are alive to the importance of its dissemination, and are increasing in numbers and skill. Native churches have been planted all over the land, and these are becoming more potential for good.

The statistics of BURMAH have been given in the figures already presented. What a difference between that country half a century ago and at this time! The jungles have given to Christ thousands of precious souls.

A little one has become a thousand." It is literally true, that for every convert then, there are more than a thousand to-day.

China.

In 1825, China was virtually locked against all approach by the missionary, as such, and at that time there was not a labourer on its soil. The ratio of conversions is now rapidly increasing. Thus the native Christians in 1853 numbered 351 ; in 1863, 1,974; in 1868, 5,743 ; and in 1875, nearly 12,000. A recent list of missionaries, published in China, gives thirty different organisations at work, and almost 200 ordained evangeliets, 99 of whom are from the United States.

In the Indian ARCHIPELAGO and the Straits, in the islands of Java, Sumatra, Borneo, Celebes, the Malaccas, &c., and in the Straits settlements, the Dutch societies, the Rhenish, Gossner's, and the Propagation Society, are principally engaged in Christian effort. It is difficult to find out the numbers connected with any of these organisations. In the Malaccas and Celebes, the Netherlands Missionary Society report 83,800 hearers, but give no list of communicants. In the other fields, 3,783 are reported, but the list is imperfect.

POLYNESIA.

Missions in Polynesia have been remarkably successful. With the exception of a few centres, or islands, like New Guinea, the Marquesas, and portions of Fiji, the people have been brought under the influence, if not the power, of the truth. More than 300 islands of Southern and Eastern Polynesia have thrown away idolatry, and this within less than fifty years. The languages of the islands have been reduced to writing.

In these

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