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ROUEN.

Origin and Progress of the City-Cotton Industry-Situation-The Old Town- Modern Improvements-Introduction of

Christianity-The Cathedral: its Historical and Legendary Associations-Among the Tombs-Church of St. OuenA Tragical Story-Other Churches of Rouen-The Palais de Justice–The Markets--A Dragon Story-The Place de la Pucelle, and Joan of Arc-The Cloche d’Argent-Fountains-Gates-Biographical Reminiscences--Bridges.

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THE ARS OF

ROUEN.

HE high importance of Rouen as a centre of commerce and industrial

skill, its historical associations, and the splendour and beauty of its

monuments, all join to give to the ancient capital of Normandy a foremost rank among the provincial cities of fair France; and, intimately connected as it was for a time with our own country, it presents to English

men many special features of interest. There are some who assert that a town occupied the present site of Rouen long before Lutetia—now Paris-rose upon her islands in the Seine. This may be true, but at any rate it is certain that the Romans found Rothomagus on the spot where Rouen now stands. It was then the capital of the Gallic tribe of the Veliocasses, and, as shown by the discovery in modern times of numerous architectural and other remains, was a town of considerable importance during the Roman occupation. Clovis and his Franks seized upon the city in 529 A.D. Three centuries later pirate hordes were sweeping down upon the northern provinces of France, and, in order to save the rest of his kingdom, the King of France ceded to the Normans, Rouen and all the province of Neustria (since known as Normandy), on condition that the chief, Rollo, should be baptised. Of the many sieges and various vicissitudes Rouen has since experienced, we can mention here only the most prominent. Some, however, will be particularised in connection with the historical monuments. After the conquest of England, in 1066, Normandy became an

appanage of the English Crown till Philip Augustus, in 1204, re-united it to France, after a severance of three hundred years. The city of Rouen flourished and extended its commerce under Frankish and Norman rulers, and it was enlarged, improved, and embellished by Philip Augustus, Francis I., and other French monarchs. In 1419, Henry V. of England besieged the city, and for six months a desperate resistance was maintained, till 30,000 of the inhabitants had perished. The Rouennais were then about to fire the place, and finish by selling their lives as dearly as possible in a sortie en masse, when the king, hearing of the project, offered terms to the besieged. A heavy ransom was paid ; Alain Blanchard, the brave and popular leader of the people in their gallant defence, was hanged, and for thirty years Rouen was occupied by the English forces. It was during this occupancy that the cruel tragedy of the burning of Jeanne d'Arc took place- an event to which we shall have again to refer. In 1449, Dunois, in spite of a brave defence by “the great Talbot," recaptured the city. Rouen saw many a sight of horror when the Roman Catholics were

ROUEN.

Origin and Progress of the City-Cotton Industry-Situation–The Old Town- Modern Improvements-Introduction of

Christianity-The Cathedral: its Historical and Legendary Associations-Among the Tombs-Church of St. OuenA Tragical Story-Other Churches of Rouen-- The Palais de Justice-The Markets-A Dragon Story-The Place de la Pucelle, and Joan of Arc-The Cloche d'Argent-Fountains-Gates—Biographical Reminiscences-Bridges.

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THE ARMS OF

ROUEX.

Font HE high importance of Rouen as a centre of commerce and industrial

skill, its historical associations, and the splendour and beauty of its

monuments, all join to give to the ancient capital of Normandy a foremost rank among the provincial cities of fair France; and, intimately connected as it was for a time with our own country, it presents to English

men many special features of interest. There are some who assert that a town occupied the present site of Rouen long before Lutetia-now Paris—rose upon her islands in the Seine. This may be true, but at any rate it is certain that the Romans found Rothomagus on the spot where Rouen now stands. It was then the capital of the Gallic tribe of the Veliocasses, and, as shown by the discovery in modern times of numerous architectural and other remains, was a town of considerable importance during the Roman occupation. Clovis and his Franks seized upon the city in 529 A.D. Three centuries later pirate hordes were sweeping down upon the northern provinces of France, and, in order to save the rest of his kingdom, the King of France ceded to the Normans, Rouen and all the province of Neustria (since known as Normandy), on condition that the chief, Rollo, should be baptised. Of the many sieges and various vicissitudes Rouen has since experienced, we can mention here only the most prominent. Some, however, will be particularised in connection with the historical monuments.

After the conquest of England, in 1066, Normandy became an appanage of the English Crown till Philip Augustus, in 1204, re-united it to France, after a severance of three hundred years. The city of Rouen flourished and extended its commerce under Frankish and Norman rulers, and it was enlarged, improved, and embellished by Philip Augustus, Francis I., and other French monarchs. In 1419, Henry V. of England besieged the city, and for six months a desperate resistance was maintained, till 30,000 of the inhabitants had perished. The Rouennais were then about to fire the place, and finish by selling their lives as dearly as possible in a sortie en masse, when the king, hearing of the project, offered terms to the besieged. A heavy ransom was paid; Alain Blanchard, the brave and popular leader of the people in their gallant defence, was hanged, and for thirty years Rouen was occupied by the English forces. It was during this occupancy that the cruel tragedy of the burning of Jeanne d'Arc took place- an event to which we shall have again to refer. In 1449, Dunois, in spite of a brave defence by “ the great Talbot," recaptured the city. Rouen saw many a sight of horror when the Roman Catholics were

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