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This, I say, is the only Question that such a Man has to put to himself, and there is no Difficulty in giving an Answer to it. For there is scarce any Case to be put concerning an A&tion, but it is very obvious, without an Inftruéter, to find out which side of the Case, if it be chosen, will most minister to the Ends of Vertue, and Religion, and Charity. Or, if it be not obvious, then it is very certain, the Man needs not much deliberate about it, but may chuse eịther side indifferently.

It is a very hard Matter oftentimes to de termine, concerning the Neceflity and Obliga, tion of Actions; that is, whether a Man be bound to do them or no. It is likewise often ą hard Matter to determine, concerning the Lawfulness of Actions, whether a Man may do them or no. But it is a very easy Matter in most Cases, to determine concerning the Expedience of Actions; that is to say, whether it be best and fittest for a Man to do them of no. Now this last, I say, is the point that a throughly good Man will consider and sfeer himself by in all his Ą&tions.

Thus for Instance, it may perhaps bear z Pispute, Whether a Man be precisely bound by God's Law, to pray folemnly Twice a Day, so as that he fins if he do not: But it will

bear no Dispute, that it is much better and | more acceptable to God, and beneficial to our

selves, to pray at least thus often, than to pray feldomer. And therefore such a Person as I am speaking of, will, upon this Conlideration, put it in Practice, (nay, and pray

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felves, and yet do no unlawful Thing? How far they may indulge Wantonneß, and yet be lo Chaft?

Now, as I said before, such Questions as these are not easy to be resolved (nor indeed is the Gospel of Chțist so contrived, as if it had taken much care whether they were refolved, or no.) But they are really Cases and Problems that require both Judgment and Learning, and likewise the Consideration of á bundance of particular Circumstances, to þav a good Account giyen of them.

But now the Man that doth entirely give : up himself to the Conduct of the Spirit, and proposeth nothing to himself in all his Acțions but the pure Glory of God ; such a Ma'n, having none of these Worldly sensual Deligns to serve in his Ą&ľons, can rarely be supposed to have any of these Questions to put to himself. And consequently he can never be at a Loss or Uncertainty, how he is to act for 'want of a Resolution of them; much less can he be in Danger of Transgressing the Bounds that God þath fixed to his A&ticns.

All the point that such a ope bath to consider in any Action is, Whether will his doing or not doing such an 4&tion, better serve the Ends of Religion? Which will tend most to his own spiritual Benefit, and the Profit of his Neighbour, to pursue this Design, or to let it alone? Whether will be more conducive to the Honour of his "Lord, to gratify such an Appetite, or to deny it Satisfaction ?

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This, I say, is the only Question that such a Man has to put to himself, and there is no

Difficulty in giving an Answer to it. For 5 there is scarce any Case to be put concerning

an A&ion, but it is very obvious, without an @ Inftruéter, to find out which side of the Case,

if it be chosen, will most minister to the Ends of Vertue, and Religion, and Charity. Or, if it be not obvious, then it is very certain, the Man needs not much deliberate about it, but may chuse either side indifferently.

It is a very hard Matter oftentimes to de termine, concerning the Neceflity and Obligadtion of Actions; that is, whether a Man be o bound to do them or no. It is likewise often

a hard Matter to determine, concerning the

Lawfulneß of Actions, whether a Man may di do them or no.' But it is a very easy Matter

in most Cafes, to determine concerning the Expedience of Actions; that is to say, whether it be best and fittest for a Man to do them or no. Now this last, I say, is the point that a throughly good Man will consider and sfeer himself by în all his Actions.

Thus for Instance, it may perhaps bear a Dispute, Whether a Man be precisely bound by God's Law, to pray folemnly Twice a Day, so as that he fins if he do not: But it will bear no Dispute, that it is much better and more acceptable to God, and beneficial to ourselves, to pray at least thus often, than to pray seldomer. And therefore such a Person as I am speaking, of, will, upon this Confideration, put it in Practice, (nay, and pray

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oftner too, as he has Occasion) without concerning himself, whether he be strictly bound so to do or ne.

It may bear a Dispute among fome Persons, whether painting the Face, be not allowable to Christian Women. But it can bear no Difpute among any, that it is more agreeable to the Sobriety and Modesty, and Chastity of a Disciple of Jefus Christ, and better serves the Ends of Religion, to forbear all such sufpicious Ornaments. (There being rarely any good End to be served by them, but abundance of Evil often arising from them.) Now this Consideration alone is enough to set the Heart of every serious Chriftian against those Practices, and to make them wholly to refrain them.

Thus again, it is argued both ways about Play or Gaming, whether it be lawful or no: (especially when Sums of Money are played for; and the Thing becomes rather an avaritious Contention, than a Recreation and Divertisement) some believing that it is innocent; others that it is a grievous Sin. But there is no Man, even of those that use is most, but will readily acknowledge, that it exposeth a Manto great and dangerous Temptations of fundry Kinds; that it is the Occasion of abundance of Sin, and abundance of Mischief, and that it feldom fails to produce intolerable Consequences, both as to Mens Souls, and Estates, and Families. Now to a Man that loves God, and has a tender Sense of his Dury, this is enough in all Conscience to deter hinn for e

yer from the Practice of Gaming, though it be not made to appear to him, that it is exprefly and explicitely forbid by any Law of Jesus Christ.

So that you see, that in those Points where there are Disputes on both sides, when the Consideration is concerning the Obligation, or the Lawfulneß of an A&ion; there is no Difficulty, no Dispute at all, when the Consideration is only concerning what is best and most fitting to be done; concerning what is most agreeable to our Duty, and most conducive to the Honour of God and Religion as to that A&tion: That is evident enough in all Cases; nor is any Man at a Loss for finding ic put. And that is the Principle which, I say, every sincere Lover of God governs himfelf by; and which I would have us all to propose to our selves for the Rule of our Actions, in order to the securing us from those Snares and Stambling Blocks, to which the Affinity between Vertue and Vice, Lawful and Unlawful, will cause therwise expose us.

Let us not stand upon Points with God Almighty, as if so much was his, and so much was our own; as if we were to share ourselves between his Service and our own Pleasures and Profits, and the like; and were resolved not to pay him any more Respect or Love, than what some express Letter of his Law doth exact at our Hands. But let us so entirely devote our selves to his Service, as to do not only all those Things which we are ftrictly bound to do, or else we are Transgressors; but all those Things that are accep

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