The Annals of Our Time: From the accession of Queen Victoria, June 20, 1837, to the peace of Versaille, February 28, 1871

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Macmillan, 1871
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Page 12 - SIRS, I here present unto you Queen VICTORIA, the Undoubted Queen of this Realm : Wherefore All you who are come this Day to do your Homage, Are you willing to do the same...
Page 439 - That an humble address be presented to her Majesty, praying that she will be graciously pleased to direct...
Page 186 - Existing rights of every European nation should be respected, but it is due alike to our safety and our interests that the efficient protection of our laws should be extended over our whole territorial limits, and that it should be distinctly announced to the world as our settled policy that no future European colony or dominion shall with our consent be planted or established on any part of the North American continent.
Page 1 - Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to his mercy our late Sovereign Lord King George the Fourth, of blessed memory, by whose decease the imperial crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland is solely and rightfully come to the high and mighty Prince...
Page 343 - Having once given her sanction to a measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister ; such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her Constitutional right of dismissing that Minister. She expects to be kept informed of what passes between him and...
Page 1 - Wales ; we, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this realm, being here assisted with these of his late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other principal gentlemen of quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London...
Page 32 - it is a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from their sins.
Page 295 - Gentlemen the Exhibition of 1851 is to give us a true test and a living picture of the point of development at which the whole of mankind has arrived in this great task, and a new starting-point from which all nations will be able to direct their further exertions.
Page 313 - Clergymen of our own Church, who have subscribed the Thirty-nine Articles, and acknowledged in explicit terms the Queen's supremacy, have been the most forward in leading their flocks, ' step by step, to the very verge of the precipice.' The honour paid to saints, the claim of infallibility for the Church, the superstitious use of the sign of the Cross, the muttering of the Liturgy so as to disguise the language in which it...
Page 244 - An Act for the better Security of the Crown and Government of the United Kingdom.

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