The Works of John Dryden: Poetical works

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Page 147 - Bread which we break is a partaking of the Body of Christ ; and likewise the Cup of Blessing is a partaking of the Blood of Christ. Transubstantiation (or the change of the substance of Bread and Wine) in the Supper of the Lord, cannot be proved by holy Writ; but is repugnant to the plain words of Scripture, overthroweth the nature of a Sacrament, and hath given occasion to many superstitions. The Body of Christ is given, taken, and eaten, in the Supper, only after an heavenly and spiritual manner....
Page 130 - And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them. Then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst and said, Peace be unto you.
Page 147 - THE supper of the Lord is not only a sign of the love that Christians ought to have among themselves one to another; but rather it is a sacrament of our redemption by Christ's death : insomuch that to such as rightly, worthily, and with faith receive the same, the bread which we break is a partaking of the body of Christ ; and likewise the cup of blessing is a partaking of the blood of Christ.
Page 177 - THE Church hath power to decree Rites or Ceremonies, and authority in controversies of faith : And yet it is not lawful for the Church to ordain anything that is contrary to God's Word written ; neither may it so expound one place of Scripture, that it be repugnant to another.
Page 130 - Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut, where the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you.
Page 439 - Through all the realms of Nonsense, absolute. This aged prince, now flourishing in peace, And blest with issue of a large increase, Worn out with business, did at length debate To settle the succession of the state; 10 And, pondering which of all his sons was fit To reign and wage immortal war with wit, Cried, " 'Tis resolved; for Nature pleads that he Should only rule, who most resembles me.
Page 39 - Thus, anxious thoughts in endless circles roll, Without a centre where to fix the soul: In this wild maze their vain endeavours end: How can the less the greater comprehend ? Or finite reason reach infinity ? For what could fathom God were more than he.
Page 441 - Shadwell never deviates into sense. Some beams of wit on other souls may fall, Strike through and make a lucid interval ; But Shadwell's genuine night admits no ray, His rising fogs prevail upon the day.
Page 459 - There thou may'st wings display and altars raise, And torture one poor word ten thousand ways. Or, if thou wouldst thy different talents suit, Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute.
Page 454 - Nay let thy men of wit too be the same, All full of thee, and differing but in name; But let no alien Sedley interpose To lard with wit thy hungry Epsom prose.

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