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LITERATURE

BOOK ONE

BY

WILLIAM H ELSON
AUTHOR EISON READERS AND GOOD ENGLISH SERIES

AND

CHRISTINE M. KECK
HEAD UNION JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN

DEPARTMENT OF
EDUCATION
RECEIVED

por ser

DEC 7 1927

YEAR
TELARILE STANFORD

PROGRAM
PUNIOR UNIVERSITY

VOUCES OC

SCOTT, FORESMAN AND COMPANY
CHICAGO
ATLANTA

NEW YORK

635281

COPYRIT 1919
BY SCOTT, FORESMAN AND COMPANY

For permission to use copyrighted material grateful
acknowledgment is made to The London Times for “The
Guards Came Through" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; to
Thomas Hardy for “Men Who March Away" from The
London Times; to John Galsworthy for “England to
Free Men” from The Westminster Gazette; to John
Masefield for "Spanish Waters”; to Hamlin Garland for
“The Great Blizzard” from Boy Life on the Prairie; to
Doubleday Page & Co. for “The Gift of the Magi" by
0. Henry; to G. P. Putnam's Sons for “Old Ephraim, the
Grizzly Bear,” from The Wilderness Hunter by Theodore
Roosevelt; to the George H. Doran Company for “Trees”
from Trees and Other Poems by Joyce Kilmer; to Mr.
R. W. Lillard for "America's Answer" from The New
York Evening Post; to Horace Traubel for “Pioneers!
O Pioneers!”, “I Hear America Singing”, “O Captain !
My Captain !” by Walt Whitman; to Charles Scribner's
Sons for “On a Florida River” by Sidney Lanier, from
The Lanier Book, copyright 1904; and to Frederick A.
Stokes Company for “Kilmeny-A Song of the
Trawlers” by Alfred Noyes from The New Morning,
copyright 1919.

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PREFACE

The Junior High School offers exceptionai opportunity for relating literature to life. In addition to the aesthetic and ethical purposes, long recognized in the study of literature, the World War emphasized the need for an extension of aims to include the teaching of certain fundamental American ideals. To marshal the available material, setting it to work in the service of social and civic ideals, is to give to literature the "central place in a new humanism." When we organize reading in the schools with reference to the teaching of ideals-personal, social, national, and patriotic--we "put the stress on literature as one of the chief means through which the child enters on his intellectual and spiritual inheritance." Outstanding among these ideals are: freedom, love of home and country, service, loyalty, courage, thrift, humane treatment of animals, a sense of humor, love of Nature, and an appreciation of the dignity of honest work. In a word, to provide a course in the history and development of civilization, particularly stressing America's part in it, is the present-day demand on the school.

The Junior High School Literature Series, of which the present volume is intended for use in the first year, provides such a

The literature brought together in this book is organized with reference to the social ideal. Nature in its varied relations to human life, particularly child life, is presented in stories and poems of animals, birds, flowers, trees, and winter, all abounding in beauty and charm. Interest in Nature leads to interest in the deeds of men filled with the spirit of adventure. The heroism of brave men and women from the age of chivalry to the days of self-sacrifice on Flanders Fields is told in ballad and romance, thus stimulating qualities of courage, loyalty, and devotion. Akin to these are the deeds of men who won freedom for their fellows and gave meaning to the words, "our inheritance of freedom." Their heroism is told in story and song, from the time of the Great Charter and Robert the Bruce to the Declara

course.

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