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tercourse between the inhabitants thy pursuits and acts !-- and what of the invisible world, and those a powerful stimulus to each, to of this inferior globe. Although fill up his place with dignity, prowe know not the manner of com- priety and duty! We are taught, munication, and are insensible of 3. The medium by which invistheir prefence, yet we have full ev. ible fpirits operate and produce efidence, that they make frequent feels in men ; the imagination. visits, and if they communicate It is the peculiar prerogative of with us in our Numbering and irra- the blessed God, the searcher of tional moments, do they not in hearts to operate on the soul by an our wakeful and sensible hours, in- immediate and irrefiltable agency. teresting themselves in all our con To the rational mind neither ancerns, and as the attendants and gels, nor devils, have immediate fpectators of our ways, are affec. access; nor can they excite volited by all our moral conduct ac- tion, nor move the affections, but cording to its nature, the good be- by the medium of the imagination, ing filled with regret, and holy re that faculty in which ideas are for. fentment, by all those instances of med, by the exhibition or imprefit, which are unworthy of the dig- lion of external sensible objects.nity and relation of man ; and As the ministers of God's pleasure, the evil exulting in the effect of according to his direction, they their stratagem, the dark caverns premonih perfons of interesting of hell resounding with shouts, in scenes which are before them, by praise of those arts of seduction impressing the imagination, in the which they so successfully practifed numbering hour, either with the upon us ; or are filled with cha- events themselves, or those extergrin and rage at a virtuous and ef- nal sensible objects, which typify fectual opposition to their plots ; and represent them.-By this avewhile the good, pleased with the nue they have access to the mind, rational and pious effort, with joy and influence or excite acts of will, ful alacrity wing their way, and by impressing the imagination with by communicating the grateful in- glowing ideas of those subjects telligence, diffuse joy and gladness which gratify and please the taste, thro' all the realms of purity and which stimulates the will to prefer bliss.-In what an inconceivably im. and pursue them, as desirable obportant view does this set the ways jeets.-By this medium evil spirof men, as having a mighty effect its practise the arts of seduction, on the inhabitants of Heaven and impressing the imagination, both hell! And in how conspicuous a in the slumbering and wakeful moplace does it fix the individuals of ment, with lively ideas of those the liuman race ! In the open objects which are accommodated to view, and engaging the attention the corrupt depraved taste, and so of their invilible spectators who entice, ensnare and destroy.-inspect and scrutinize their conduct, How exceedingly necessary to and wait, in anxious fufpenfe, the watch and prays knowing the dedecisions they form respecting the vices of satan, left he get advanparts they will act, and affected by age against us ?-And do not hotheir conduct according to its kind; ly angels restrain the pious from acts how august and impreslive the of vice, by suggesting affecting idea !--What an invincible reviews of the evil and danger of Straint should it lay on all unwor.' them? And excite to pious acts by

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the purpose of real piety and Chrif has experienced the impression, retian comfort, to admonish the fub- alized the effect, and the event, jeets of danger, restrain from fin, surprising him at an unexpected and administer instruction, encour. hour, has compelled him to cry agement and confolation to the out, this is my dream! He can no children of God in this dreary more dispute the dream, than he world. Suspending otherremarks, can dispute his own recollection. let us now consider, to what reli- He feels that the dream portended gious purpofes this hypothefis may the event. He is equally conscious be applied.--Admittir:g the reali that the impresion could arise from ty of dreams from anexternal cause, no natural cause within, and could or invisible agent, we may infer, be produced by no human cause

1. The infallible certainty of without. It niust have been proanother world, and the existence duced by an invisible agent. He is of immaterial spirits. That such as certain therefore, of the exif. effects are produced, such impref. tence and agency of invisible fpirfions made, is now supposed, but its, from the effect which he feels, this most certainly implies a cause as he is of the existence and infu. which produced, an agent who ence of the sun, by the light and made them; and the evidence of heat of its rays ; and he is as cersuch an existence which this ex. tain of these, as he is of his own hibits, is direct and absolutely con- perceptions and senses : andif there clufive. It is impoflible to evade be such beings, they must have a it. Some who choose to be fcep. place of residence, and there must tical, to deny, and doubt, of every be an invisible, eternal world.thing, will affirm the supposition, According to the quality of the that impresions are made on the dream, its tendency and effect, mind by an external, invisible cause, good or evil, must be its author, to be wholly chimerical, though as the fountain cannot send forth the gravity and credibility of the at the same place sweet water and persons who relate them, the nu: bitter : and if dreams are of dimerous instances in which they verse qualities, the authors of them appear, the endless variety of form must consist of opposite characters. they assume, and the consent of By the medium of dreams or imthe event to the impression, would prefions, therefore, the subject of irresistibly obtrude a conviction of them has a kind of direct and intheir reality upon their minds, if tuitive evidence of the certain ex. they had not abandoned themselves istence of invisible agents, or spirto an obstinate and incurable in its, of opposite principles and purcredulity.-But to those who ad- suing opposite ends, inhabiting an mit the reality of such dreams, this invisible world-he penetrates the evidence of another world and in-dark recess--discovers good and visible agents, is demonftrative and evil angels—heaven and hell, as incontestible, The existence of the respective places of their abode another world and immaterial spir. --and his views ultimately termiits can no more be controverted by nate in the incontrovertibly certain them, than the existence of other existence of one only living and countries and other nations with true God, who is over all blessed which they have intercourse. Tothe foreve more. subject of them especially, this ev. 2. These impreffions demonidence is direct and intuitive. He strate, that there is a conftant in

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tercourse between the inhabitants thy pursuits and acts !--and what of the invisible world, and those a powerful stimulus to each, to of this inferior globe. Although fill up his place with dignity, prowe know not the manner of com- priety and duty! We are taught, munication, and are insensible of 3. The medium by which invistheir presence, yet we have full ev. ible spirits operate and produce efidence, that they make frequent seats in men ; the imagination. visits, and if they communicate It is the peculiar prerogative of with us in our slumbering and irra- the blessed God, the searcher of tional moments, do they not in hearts to operate on the soul by an our wakeful and sensible hours, in- immediate and irrefiltable agency. teresting themselves in all our con- To the rational mind neither ancerns, and as the attendants and gels, nor devils, have immediate spectators of our ways, are affec. access; nor can they excite volited by all our moral conduct ac- tion, nor move the affections, but cording to its nature, the good be by the nicdium of the imagination, ing filled with regret, and holy re that faculty in which ideas are forsentment, by all those instances of med, by the exlibition or impresit, which are unworthy of the dig- fion of external fen ble objects.nity and relation of man; and As the ministers of God's pleasure, the evil exuling in the effect of according to his direction, they their stratagem, the dark caverns premonith persons of interesting of hell resounding with shouts, in scenes which are before them, by praise of those arts of seduction impresfing the imagination, in the which they so successfully practised Ilumbering hour, either with the upon us ; or are filled with cha. events themselves, or those extergrin and rage at a virtuous and ef- nal sensible objects, which typify fectual opposition to their plots ; and represent them.---By this avewhile the good, pleased with the nue they have access to the mind, rational and pious effort, with joy- and influence or excite acts of will, ful alacrity wing their way, and by impressing the imagination with by communicating the grateful in- glowing ideas of those subje&ts telligence, diffuse joy and gladness which gratify and please the taste, thro all the realms of purity and which Itimulates the will to prefer bliss.- In what an inconceivably im. and pursue them, as defirable obportant view does this set the ways jects.—By this medium evil spirof men, as having a mighty effect its practise the arts of seduction, on the inhabitants of Heaven and impressing the imagination, both hell! And in how conspicuous a in the slumbering and wakeful mo. place does it fix the individuals of ment, with lively ideas of those the human race ! In the open objects which are accommodated to view, and engaging the attention the corrupt depraved tafte, and so of their invilible spectators who entice, ensnare and destroy.-inspect and scrutinize their conduct, How exceedingly necessary to and wait, in anxious fufpenfe, the watch and pray; knowing the dedecisions they form respecting the vices of satan, left he get advanparts they will act, and affected by tage against us ?-And do not hotheir conduct according to its kind; ly angels reftrain the pious from acts -how august and impreslive the of vice, by suggesting affecting idea !--What an invincible re views of the evil and danger of straint should it lay on all unwor." them? And excite to pious acts by

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exhibiting the happy fruits of them, ed in a part of the county of Or. in the most inviting and persuasive tario, state of New York, Tbe form -The subject bath been date is Pittstown, Odober 7th protracted to an enexpected, and 1800. very probably to a tedious length;

« In the beginning of 1799, but if it gives any rational concep- there was a small church here tions of the agency of invisible (Pittstown) consisting of only 9 {pirits—if it produces an habitual or lo members ; this church was and realizing sense, that we are at formed in 1796, when Mr. Rolph all times in their view, and espe. became their minister. This was cially in the view of an all-seeing the only Congregational or Presby. and heart-searching God and judge terian church in the county, which --if it induces us to exercise a dif- had a paftor in the beginning of creet and holy circumspection over 1799.* At this fame date, there all our conduct, and to perform the was a church in Bloomfield No. duties of our characters and rela- | 10, consisting of about 30 memtions with alliduity and fidelity, bers; some of these belonged to and so to prepare for the society of the neighbouring societies. There an innumerable company of angels, was a fmail disorganized Presbyteand to unite in the employment, rian church at Charleston--I be. delight and praise, of the general lieve there were not more than 70r assembly and church of the first- 8 members. There was, at the born-the fruits of it will be glori- same time, a church upon the same ous and happy.-

plan, consisting of a few more

members, but in a neglected and FOR THE CONNECTICUT Evan. unsocial state, in Palmyra. These GELICAL MAGAZINE. were, I believe, all the pedo-bap

tist churches in Ontario county, in Messrs. EDITORS,

“ There are now the following azine requests an answer to the following questions, viz.

churches upon the congregational 1. Did God from all eternity, plan; viz. One at Canandarqua, decree that a certain part of man consisting of about 20 members.

One at Bloomfield No. 11, con. kind, viz. the Elect should go to heaven do what they will ?

Gisting of about 20 members. The 2. Did God from all eternity

church at Bloomfield No. 10, 4th decree that the other part of man

range, is now composed of nearly

In the same town, kind, viz. the Rebrobates should 70 members. go tollell do what they can ?

No. 10, 5th range, there is a church 3. Can Godbe just in so doing?

formed of about 24 members. A: P.

Bristol, No. 9, a church was formed in May 1799, which now conlifts of 67 members. The church

in No. 8, has increased to 22. Religious Intelligence, A church was formed in Middle

town in January of the present The following Extra& from the year ; it contains 12 members.

Misionary Journal of the Rev. The church at Charlelton has been Seth Willision will

show the rapidity with which settlements have Mr. Rolph has been lately dirbeen formed and churches gather misled.

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revived out of its ruins and re-or-/ preaching of the gospel and the gaoized, upon the congregational admimftration of Christian ordiplatform, and now contains more than 20 members. The church at Palmyra has had considerable ad. Extrad of a letter from the Rev. ditions, but I cannot tell how David Huntington, Miffionary many.

to the northern counties of New • The local situation of these York and Vermont, dated churches is fuch that they all ad Hardwick, Feb. 5, 1801. join each other, except Palmyra, “ Ever since I began my mis which is severed from the rest by a fion, I have experienced much of fingle town. These churches the goodness of God, in the fpehave, during the present year, cial divine supports he hath given formed themselves into an Asso. | me, and in the success he hath afciacion for mutual assistance. The forded to my attempts to promote church at Bristol, No. 9, is fur. I his glorious cause. In many planished with a pastor, the Rev. Mr. ' ces the hearts of the people have Grover. The church at Bloom- been inclined to receive me with field, No. 11, have the Rev. cordiality, and to hear the word Reuben Parmele for their pastor. of God with great seriousness. la The church at Palmyra have the various parts of the state of NewRev. Mr. Fairbanks for their York and also of Vermont, the imuniter ; and the Rev. Mr. spirit of the Lord has been eviFW is ordained palor of the dently poured out, and the appearLerch in Canandarqua. These ances of reformation have been four minifters have all been settled and still are encouraging. Once fince the revival of religion began in particular, when I had much in the county, the winter before exhausted my strength in preachfalt. The Rev. Zadoc Hunn who ing, the young people were so resides in the county, occasionally deeply impreffed with a sense of preaches in the destitute settlements. eternal things, that they desired The revival of religion which took me to preach again in the evening, place in Ontario, the last year seems which I accordingly did ; and I to have produced most of these hap- trult the season was not loft. This py fruits.”

was in a place near the Province In other parts of his journal line, never before visited by MilMr. Williston mentions the forma- fionaries. The people have agreed tion of many churches in other to keep up public worship on the counties, and it appears that the fabbath and are many of them enreligious state of the country is on gaged in religion. the whole flourishing. It will be “ In many other places there a long time before the new settle are evident beginnings of a good ments at the westward can be sup-work; the harvest in these northplied with regular, fettled paftors, ern settlements is truly plenteous, and all who have at heart the in- but aias ! the labourers are few. tereft of the Redeemer's king. Faithful guides to fouls, who are dom will feel the importance of skilful in the word of righteoulcontributing generouQy to the fup- nefs, are greatly needed. Many port of Millionaries, that those enquire whether more Miffionaries new and scattered settlements may may be soon expected, and are not be wholly deprived of the anxious to have preachers among

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