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ought to be remembered that the appalling results of the drinking system are not wholly confined to the children in our schools; many a promising teacher has fallen a victim. A warm friend of Sunday schools states, as a solemn fact, that in a certain town in Lancashire no less than four 'unfortunate females' were seen together on the street, every one of whom had once been a teacher in a sabbath school! Male and female teachers! it is for you to say whether this mighty obstacle to your benevolent efforts is to continue.' If you do not destroy it, it will destroy all your hopes and frustrate all your efforts. Let no Sabbath pass without warnings and entreaties, even to tears,

society present to the young solemnly call upon all parents and Sunday school teachers to urge upon the rising generation the adoption of the practice of entire abstinence from all intoxicating liquors.-Moved by Mr. Thomas Hodgson, of the Wesley Place School; seconded by Mr. Wm. Pickwell, of the Wesleyan Association Sunday School; supported by Mr. James Holiins, superintendent of the Independent Sunday school.

2. That the committee be requested to take such steps as may be considered most prudent for bringing that subject under the notice of every Sunday school superintendent in York:-Moved by Mr. Thomas Monkhouse, su

against the seventh curse-in-perintendent of the Wesley Place toxication. Sunday School; seconded by Mr. T. B. Smithies, secretary of the Wesley Place Sunday school.

The speakers dwelt at some length on the fearful counteracting influences which the use of intoxicating liquors is exerting on the labour of sabbath school teachers, and urged upon all parents and teachers the adoption of the temperance pledge, in order that they might set the young an example which, if followed, would certainly save them from the evils of intemperance.

Warminster.-We are glad to announce, that the Independent Sunday school here has just made a collection on behalf of the distressed Irish, especially of the children in a Sunday school at Sligo. An example well worthy of imitation.

York: Sunday School Temperance Meeting.-On Monday, Jan. 11, a large and interesting meeting was held in the Lecture-hall, in this city, for the purpose of promoting the spread of temperance principles amongst the young.

James Backhouse, Esq., ably Occupied the chair. He stated, that during his travels in Van Dieman's Land, he had conversed with many of the convicts, who referred their ruin to the 'drinking custom' of the workshops in which they were apprenticed.

The following resolutions were submitted to the meeting, and unanimously passed:

1. That the fearful prevalence of intemperance in this country, and the numerous temptations which the drinking usage of

The secretary stated that the committee would supply Sunday school teachers with neat pocket pledge books for the use of their classes, considerable good having already resulted from this plan.

Edinburgh: Total Abstinence Society.-The weekly meeting was held on Tuesday evening, Jan. 19, Judge Marshall delivering a long and able address. The temperance reform was also brought under consideration by the learned gentleman, who clearly proved the inutility of human laws as a remedy for drunkenness. joined the society.

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UNCLE HARRY'S LETTERS.
No. X.-STORMS AT SEA.

Dear Young Friends,-Uncle Harry has not been in a storm on the ocean or on the land this year; but he has read so much about storms lately, that he will this month direct your attention a little to them.

"How the driving wind and rain Sweep across the boist'rous inain! Hark how the bellowing tempests

roar;

See the surges lash the shore;
Ships on raging billows toss'd,
Masts, and sails, and anchor lost!
Rocks destroy the rolling barque,
Night o'erwhelms, and oh, how dark!
'Tis thus stern Winter rules o'er
Nature's wide domain.

And thus Jehovah proves his universal reign.'

A storm at sea is a terrifying event! The wind roars the ocean rolls-sea-birds screamthe waves rise mountains highthe gulf yawns the ship pitches and tosses and the foaming surges threaten to bury the poor affrighted sailor! Poor mariner! we pity him. Let us imagine we see him on deck. How he wrings his hands, dreading every wave that rolls! how anxious and distressed is he! Then pray that the sailor may have in every storm that he meets with, the

Saviour for his guide and his captain, so that if buried from our sight beneath the bring waves, his spirit may rise upon "That heavenly shore, Where winds and waves distress no [more.

there for ever to adore that God who holdeth the waters in the hollow of his hand-and hath power over the waves, and can say to them, Thus far shall ye come and no farther; and here shall your proud waves be stayed.'

6

I have another kind of storm at sea of which to write-it is a thunder-storm. poor sailor boy out at sea, with Imagine some individuals beside himself-and perhaps not more than nineteen they seem a little world by themselves, not a soul to be own. seen, or a voice heard but their and gloomy-the winds begin to The clouds gather black blow-the waves rise like lofty vessel the lightnings flash, and turrets and break upon the the thunders roll in peals long and loud-sheets of flame cross ship trembles as though she the deck; and every part of the sits on every countenance. would go to pieces. Anxiety

At

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this moment the poor boy is ordered aloft to send down the main-top-gallant yard; he has scarcely reached it, when & cloud charged with electric fluid strikes the mast, and the sailor boy is thrown into the yawning ocean, and presently the ship itself is struck-she springs a leak-the pumps and every effort are used to save her and themselves-but in vain! She sinks and all perish at sea, far, far from land. This is a true picture of a thunderstorm at sea; though you must remember that the mast is not always struck, or the vessel always lost; for it often happens that the Almighty has pity upon the sailor, and saves him from the furious storm in order that be may praise Him for his goodness, who maketh the storm a calm, so that the waves there of are still.'

It would be impossible for me to tell you all the results of storms at sea; but I will set before you a picture that may be often witnessed in a sea-port town. Hundreds of men, women, and children, throng the postoffice waiting to receive the sad news the post will bring. Every countenance appears covered with distress. Mothers weeping for their children, because it is reported they are not. Shipowners pacing the streets to and fro with anxious looks The post arrives-all with saddened thoughts and deep anxiety rush to the postman, eager to know the results of the gale. The postman delivers letter after letter. See the readers. A merchant gets his letter-opens it, and reads: 'The Amity was seen at some distance riding near the sands, masts gone, and in a sinking state. She is wrecked-she foundered at her anchors-and all have perished.'

*

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Then there are some crying and weeping bitterly, and some even screaming and wringing their hands. Presently a poor woman receives a letter, written in a strange hand; she reads and swoons away. Children come clinging around her, and asking, 'What is the matter, mother?' Shall we never see our father any more?' and then they begin to weep. The mother recovering a little tells them, He is lost on the deep sea! what shall we do?'

6

We have the picture of a lighthouse at the commencement of my letter. It represents Eddystone lighthouse off the port at Plymouth, to warn the sailor of the Eddystone rock. The one now standing is the third that has been erected there. The first was washed away with all its inmates, Nov. 27, 1707, in a terrible storm which occurred at that time The second was burned in 1755; and the third was partly burned in 1770. It is now built of stone, and I think has stood the storms of seventytwo years.

My dear young friends, you are sailors, voyaging on the sea of life. Various are the storms by which your barques will be beset. Teachers will tell you at length about them. Seek to have hope for your anchorfaith for your polar star, by which to guide the vessel Christ for your captain-the Bible for your chart and Heaven the port to which you are bound. Teachers will be as floating lights to warn you of danger, as lighthouses to warn you off the rocks-such as pride, unbelief, carelessness, and selfwill. Besides you will find pointed out in your chart beacons of persons who fell into quicksands by their self-will, in wish

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Saviour for his guide and his: captain, so that if buried from our sight beneath the briny waves, his spirit may rise upon

"That heavenly shore, [more.' Where winds and waves distress no

there for ever to adore that God who holdeth the waters in the hollow of his hand-and hath power over the waves, and can say to them, Thus far shall ye come and no farther; and here shall your proud waves be stayed.'

6

I have another kind of storm at sea of which to write-it is a thunder-storm. Imagine some poor sailor boy out at sea, with perhaps not more than nineteen individuals beside himself-and they seem a little world by themselves, not a soul to be

the gulf yawns the ship pitches and tosses and the foaming surges threaten to bury the poor affrighted sailor! Poor mariner! we pity him. Let us imagine we see him on deck. How he wrings his hands, dreading every wave that rolls! how anxious and distressed is he! Then pray that the sailor may have in every storm that he meets with, the

the waves rise mountains high-seen, or a voice heard but their own. The clouds gather black and gloomy-the winds begin to blow-the waves rise like lofty turrets and break upon the vessel-the lightnings flash, and the thunders roll in peals long and loud-sheets of flame cross the deck; and every part of the ship trembles as though she would go to pieces. Anxiety sits on every countenance. At

this moment the poor boy is Then there are some crying ordered aloft to send down the and weeping bitterly, and some main-top-gallant yard; he has even screaming and wringing scarcely reached it, when & cloud their hands. Presently a poor charged with electric fluid strikes woman receives a letter, written the mast, and the sailor boy is in a strange hand; she reads and thrown into the yawning ocean, swoons away. Children come and presently the ship itself is clinging around her, and asking, struck-she springs a leak-theWhat is the matter, mother?' pumps and every effort are used Shall we never see our father to save her and themselves—but any more?" and then they begin in vain! She sinks and all perish to weep. The mother recovering at sea, far, far from land. a little tells them, 'He is lost is a true picture of a thunder- on the deep sea! what shall storm at sea; though you must we do ?' remember that the mast is not always struck, or the vessel always lost; for it often happens that the Almighty has pity upon the sailor, and saves him from the furious storm in order that he may praise Him for his goodness, who maketh the storm a calm, so that the waves there of are still.'

This

6

It would be impossible for me to tell you all the results of storms at sea; but I will set before you a picture that may be often witnessed in a sea-port town. Hundreds of men, women, and children, throng the postoffice waiting to receive the sad news the post will bring. Every countenance appears covered with distress. Mothers weeping for their children, because it is reported they are not. Shipowners pacing the streets to and fro with anxious looks The post arrives-all with saddened thoughts and deep anxiety rush to the postman, eager to know the results of the gale. The postman delivers letter after letter. See the readers. A merchant gets his letter opens it, and reads:

'The Amity was seen at some distance riding near the sands, masts gone, and in a sinking state. She is wrecked-she foundered at her anchors and all have perished.'

*

We have the picture of a lighthouse at the commencement of my letter. It represents Eddystone lighthouse off the port at Plymouth, to warn the sailor of the Eddystone rock. The one now standing is the third that has been erected there. The first was washed away with all its inmates, Nov. 27, 1707, in a terrible storm which occurred at that time The second was burned in 1755; and the third was partly burned in 1770. It is now built of stone, and I think has stood the storms of seventytwo years.

My dear young friends, you are sailors, voyaging on the sea of life. Various are the storms by which your barques will be beset. Teachers will tell you at length about them. Seek to have hope for your anchor— faith for your polar star, by which to guide the vesselChrist for your captain-the Bible for your chart and Heaven the port to which you are bound. Teachers will be as floating lights to warn you of danger, as lighthouses to warn you off the rocks-such as pride, unbelief, carelessness, and selfwill. Besides you will find pointed out in your chart beacons of persons who fell into quicksands by their self-will, in wish

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