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For I am proverbed with a grandsire phrase.

Acti. Sc. 4.

0, then I see, Queen Mab hath been with you,
She is the fairies' midwife; and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone
On the forefinger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep. Act i. Sc. 4.

True, I talk of dreams; Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy.

Act i. Sc. 4.

Her beauty hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear.

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Act i. Sc. 5.

Too early seen unknown, and known too late.

Act i. Sc. 5.

He jests at scars, that never felt a wound.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand !
0, that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

O Romeo, Romeo ! wherefore art thou Romeo ?

Act ii. Sc. 2. What's in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

Alack ! there lies more peril in thine eye,
Than twenty of their swords.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

At lovers' perjuries, They say, Jove laughs.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

Rom. Lady, by yonder blessed moon I swear, That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops,

Jul. O, swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon, That monthly changes in her circled orb, Lest that thy love prove likewise variable. Act ii. Sc. 2.

The god of my idolatry.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night, till it be morrow.

Act i. Sc. 2.

Nor aught so good, but, strained from that fair use, Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.

Act ii. Sc. 3. Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye.

Act ii. Sc. 3. Thy old groans ring yet in my ancient ears.

Act ii. Sc. 3. Stabbed with a white wench's black eye. Act ii. Sc. 4.

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Here comes the lady ;-0, so light a foot
Will ne'er wear out the everlasting flint. Act ii. Sc. 6.

A plague o' both the houses !

Act iii. Sc. 1.

Rom. Courage, man! the hurt cannot be much.

Mer. No, 't is not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church-door; but ’t is enough.

Act iii. Sc. 1.

When he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine, That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical.

Act iii. Sc. 2.

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O, that deceit should dwell In such a gorgeous palace !

Act iii. Sc. 2.

Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy.

Act iii. Sc. 3.

Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain-tops. Act iii. Sc. 5.

Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.

Act iii. Sc. 5.

Villain and he are many miles asunder.

Act iii. Sc. 5.

Not stepping o'er the bounds of modesty. Act iv. Sc. 2.

My bosom's lord sits lightly in his throne. Act v. Sc. I.

A beggarly account of empty boxes.

Act v. Sc. 1.

My poverty, but not my will, consents.

Act v. Sc. 1.

A feasting presence full of light.

Act v. Sc. 3.

Beauty's ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips, and in thy cheeks,
And death's pale flag is not advanced there.

Act v. Sc. 3.

Eyes, look

your

last! Arms, take your last embrace !

Act v. Sc. 3.

TIMON OF ATHENS.

Are not within the leaf of pity writ.

Act iv. Sc. 3.

I'll example you with thievery : The sun's a thief, and with his great attraction Robs the vast sea : the moon 's an arrant thief, And her pale fire she snatches from the sun : The sea's a thief, whose liquid surge resolves The moon into salt tears : the earth 's a thief, That feeds and breeds by a composture stolen From general excrement : each thing's a thief.

Activ. Sc. 3.

MACBETH.

i Witch. When shall we three meet again,

In thunder, lightning, or in rain ?

Act i. Sc. I.

Fair is foul, and foul is fair.

Act i. Sc. 1.

If you can look into the seeds of time,
And say, which grain will grow, and which will not.

Act i. Sc. 3.

The earth hath bubbles, as the water has,
And these are of them.

Act i. Sc. 3.

Stands not within the prospect of belief.

Act i. Sc. 3.

The insane root That takes the reason prisoner.

Act i. Sc. 3.

Two truths are told, As happy prologues to the swelling act Of the imperial theme.

Act i. Sc. 3.

And make my seated heart knock at my ribs.

Act i. Sc. 3.

Present fears Are less than horrible imaginings.

Act i. Sc. 3.

Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

Act i. Sc. 3.

Nothing in his life Became him like the leaving it; he died, As one that had been studied in his death To throw away the dearest thing he owed, As 't were a careless trifle.

Act i. Sc. 4.

There's no art To find the mind's construction in the face. Act i. Sc. 4.

Yet do I fear thy nature ;
It is too full of the milk of human kindness.

Act i. Sc. 5.

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