Page images
PDF
EPUB

Dec. 2.

Magazine, I shall be happy in having the river Avon, and 16 froin the Bristol communicated it.

channel, fitnated between two hills J. Hawker, Richmond Herald. (Claverton and Laufdowni), nearly two “ Fosil Crocodile, one of the greateft miles each in height; the component curiofitics in the Foffil world, which the parts of which hills, from thieir lummits latè years have produced. It is the skeleton to their bases, are Oolile, Free-fione, of a large crocodile almost entire, found blue and, white Lyas, Marl, a mall at a great depth under ground, bedded in portion of Iron-stone, and the lower Hone. This was in the poffeffion of Lin

bed red ground. kius, who wrote an accurate description of this curious Foffil. It was found in Mr. URBAN, the side of a large mountain in the midland part of Germany, and in a fratum of I HAVE derived great pleasure froin

reading the judicious vindication of black Foffil-ftone, fomewhat like our com

the Delegates of the Clarendon Press in mon flate, but of a coarfer texture; the fame with that in which the Foffil-fish in your Magazine for October lali, p. many parts of the world are found, The 916–922, by Oxonienfis. In pagig keleton had the back and ribs very plain,

he quotes a paffage, which is thus and was of a much deeper black than the privted in Ifaac Walton's own edition rest of the stone. The part of the stone of his Lives in 1664, 1670, and 1675 ; where the head lay, was not found ; this

Should be girt, a staff in their hand, being broken off juft at the shoulders, but to eat a lami." that irregularly, so that in one place a In Di. Zouch's edition of Walton's part of the back of the head was visible Lives, p. 304, the reading is shod, in its natural form ; the two shoulder- begirt, a Raff in their hands, to eat a bones were very fair, and three of the feet lamb."' were well preferved; the legs were of their Let it be remarked that the paslage natural shape and size, and the feet pre- is not in Walton's Life of Hooker. It ferved even to the extremities of the five is found in “ an excellent letter froin toes each."

Encyclopædia.

Mr. George Cranıner, to R. H. conThe greatest part of a Fofil Crocodile cerning the new Church discipline;" was discovered in the year 1805, by the which letter was reprinted by Walton, Rev. Peter Hawker, jun. of Wood- and placed at the end of the life of chester in the county of Gloucester, at Hooker. It appears froin the first eliWetton near Bath, bedded in lime and tion of this lelier, printed by itself in iron-stone 20 feet beneath the furface; 1642, previous to any of Wallou's

Toil is a ftratum about two feet publication, that Dr. Zouch's reading in depth, of a red caft. The following

is in perfect agreement with it, and is a detail of the dimensions : length therefore to be preferred. Indeed if the from the extreme part of the head to context be considered, it is the only one the end of the tail, 104 feet. Number that gives lente to the patlage. A. U. of vertebræ 70; those which have their spinal procefles perfect, 17. Os sacrin, Mr. URBAN, two in number, 9 inches each in cir.

I

BEG leave to say one word more cumference. Head, 3 feet 2 inches in

on the emigration of Swallows. lengte; depih twelve inches.

Os Though very improbable, yet fome frontis,from right to left, 8{ inches over. fpecies may feep ihe Winter' in EngOrbit of the eye, 8 inches long, and land; bui ihai the common Houle 6 wide. Number of teeth 120; those Swallows go to Africa, I have not the perfect measure 24 inches in length. least doubt. I have seen multitudes in Ribs many, very perfect. Two clavi- their passage across the Mediterranean ; cles, one quite perfect, 5 inches long feveral of which, fatigued and driven and 4 wide. Siernum, g inches in by the wind, I hat in my hands, length. Os huineri, both perfect, 7 When recovered, they all flew the laine inches long, five wide. Vertebræ of direction, to the Coast of Africa. the back, 9 inches in circumference ;

Yours, &c.

B. I. B. at the upper part of the tail 8 inches ; the centre 9 inches ; and the terminal *** The Letter to a young person of vertebræ 44 inches.

„Fortune, from a Man who paid his adSome Nautili, Cornu Ammoniæ, dresles to her, and has since married her, Trochi, Muscles, Peciens, Anomie, would afford little entertainment to our were also found in the same tione, beau. readers, and might give uneafiness to the tifully coated with crvlialized Pyriles. parties. If the Lover could not Spell, it The quarry is about half a mile from is evident he could put together.

Mr.

the upper

Jan 7.

[ocr errors]

mav

1

Mr. URBAN,

Jan. 3. await me in fome other quarter. We I HAVE in my pofleflion a large know who it is that hath promised of written

leave Holland and Germany in 1794, from “ to guide us with his counsel." He which I purpose occafionally to make knows how to over-rule our fhortfich lélections as, I think, may con. fighted views to those ends which tribute to the inforination or amuse be most conducive to his glory, the inent of your readers. Tain encouraged advantage of others, and our own to make choice of your Miscellany happiness: from the favourable reception given to Before I left London I had the fatis. the « Tour through the Neiherlands faction of engaging an afstant who in the Autumn of 1793."

had been strongly recommended to me Clericus LEICESTRIENSIS. as a man of unaffected piety. I was

pleased with his conversation ; he Letters from Holland and GERMANY ing, a liberal turn of mind, with soft

seemed to have a good tincture of learnin 1794.

and gentle maniers.

I shall be very LETTER Í.

happy to hear that he acquits himself

Rotterdam, to the fatisfaction of a Hock whole My dear friend,

April 11, 1794. fpiritual interests I am bound by every I liule thought, when I took up motive of gratitude to confult. He my pen to write to you from this place promises to infruct the children, and lait Autumin, that in little more than to be asliduous in visiting the people, half a year I fhould be writing to you after the example of St. Paul, from again from Rotterdam. However, so houfe to houfe. All this looks very it is ; and where I inay he fix months well; and, I Hatter myself, this new hence is more than I can pretend to connection will be attended with mus. ennjecture. The with nearest my cua! fatisfaion. heart is, that I may be iteering mý This important business being setcourse for England, and with the pro- tled, the next point to be adjusted was fpect of apending ihe Winter in L--- 00r route on the Continent.. The th-e, where, if it should fo please question was, which was the bef the All-wile Difpoferof Events, I should Ecole Militaire for the young foldier. be happy in remain for life; but Provis Mr. , after having Auctuated for dence ofien ihwarts our fondest mishes, fome rime between Brunswick and and never without fome wife and good Dresden, at length decided in favout ends in view ; at least I am sure I have of the latter place. I am glad of it, reafon to say fis when I take a retro as Upper Saxony is the very country I fpective view of my own life. I spent myfelf Mould have chosen, had I gone many happy days inter Silvas Acafolus cum folo. At Dresden I thali demi, and felt many a pang on being have free access to the Elector's noble obliged to quit the Thades of Alma Ma library, through our Minister at that ter ; bil, ere long, I became quite re Coori, and be within reach of the cele conciled to the change. Sweet is the brated University of Leiplic. I have memory of those days that were fpent letters of recommendation to fome very at Bed in literary leisure ; and though eminent Lutheran Divines from the I removed from ihence with great re Rev. Dr. Burckhardt, of the Savoy. I luctance to the retirement of a country am told, moreover, that the German curacy, inter Rusticanus verfans verfa- language is spoken in greater purity at túfque; I had, afterwards, fufficient Drelden than in any other part of the realon to conclude that the change Empire ; and that the inhabitants are was, wisely, ordered. You know with distinguished by urbanity and politeness. what grief and hearinels of heart I On Tuesday the First of April we took my leave of that beloved (pot. set out from London in a neat and What may be the consequence of ihis commodious carriage of our own, lait fep is known only to that good which we have bronght with us hither. and gracious Being who fixes the This vehicle will enable us not only to bounds of our habitation ; and if I am travel in style, comme Milords Anglois, never more to resume my station at but, what is of much more confe

--I confort myself with the hope quence, in the most comfortable manthat a field of greater usefulvess may net we could with, as we shall have Gent. Mag. January, 1807.

[ocr errors]

DO

a

may have been to blame, in not entering perhaps, we shall acquire more correct': so deeply into this subject as it deserves, notions on the subject if we inquire and in confining theinfelves to the what dress was intended for? And it muffs, hoops, ribbons, oi caps of is upon this important quesion, as their own times, without considering just now hinted, that considerable light these in connexion with the cause of has lately been thrown. all dress, and of all varieties of dress. There'ufed to be two opinions on They look

upon dress only in its con- this subject; the one, thai dress was nexion with the body; whereas it is intended for ornament, the other for well known that the connexion is warmth and decency. The first opimuch more intimate with the mind, nion, I think, must be given mp, unand that the body is a mere passive lels they who hold it will consent that agent appointed to exhibit the lymi. it should blended with the other. The toms and signals of what is passing second opinion is what we are most within. I am not surprized, there concerned in, and what molt now, ! fore, that men should have failed in think, appear to be one of those antireforming matters of this kind, who quated opinions which we derive froin have yiewed drels with the

eyes

of our ancestors, but are not confiftent milliner rather than those of a philoso- with that liberality of mind and free, pher, and have shown that they are dom of thinking which distinguish better qualified to triin a gown, than their posteriıy. Indeed, if we appeal to mend the wearer.

to facts only (and to what can we ap. i I do not profess, in this paper, la peal with more certainly d) this opinion enter upon the subject at full length; will appear to have very little foundabecause it would require, perhaps, the tion. If dress were intended for labour of a mau's life to reduce it to a warmth, would so many persons have fyltem, with the comfortable conclu, thrown it almost entirely off on the fion that much of that labour might approach of a severe winter ? Would be thrown away. I shall only, there. they have been content to perish in fore, in compliance with the wishes the extremes af frost and fashion, if of my correspondents, throw out a warmth had been any part of the use few hints in my delultory way, which of cloaths ? As lo decency, the opimay be hereafter improved by those nign of our ancestors may perhaps who have time and leilure.

have a better foundation ; but even Every fciençe must be liydied by re- with respect to that, the fashionable curring to certain firft principles, or world are by no meang agreed, and the general and acknowledged truths, from experiments of our milliners and man, which we may proceed to particular luamakers on the subject, have alarmed and practical applications. Il'is, there fome very well-ineaning people of the fore, with some fatisfaction, that I old school. They have, I must con. lately perceived an inclination to trace fess, carried the stripping fysiem much backward what may be termes the farther than it ought to be carried firft principles of dress. Indeed, we in this country, and must ere now cannot be supposed to argue well upon have been the deftruçlion of their own any subject without corred definitions, trade, if they had not made a finali and u jhout tracing the subject as far reserye of dress which they claim the back as poflible, and endeavouring 10 privilege of new-modelling at pleasure, profit by those who have gone before It has been a queftion with lone reus. In like manner, we shall certainly feeling persons, to what all this tend. underland one other better upon the ed? and numerouş invectives, in all fubject of drefs, if we are able to agree Mapes, essays, painphlets, and caricaas io what dress is, and what it was ture-prints, have been employed to rin intended for.

dicule the fashion. For my part, i Now, on these two questions, or, chole to contemplate the whole as the at least, on the second, a very coulin relult of an experiment tried in con. derable light was lately attempted to juvelion with our Parisian neighbours, be thrown. Dr. Johnson gives no in order to folve the question on the other definition of dress, than by these utility of dress, in the first infance, three words, cloaths, garment, 'habil; and then to determine the smallest which are by no means fasisfactory, quantity of dress necessary for a belle of because they tell us merely that dress the first fashion. That æconomy eniş cloaths, and cloaihs is drels. But tered at all into confideration, muft

, I

daring the whole time of the siege, and greater part of this class of corresponde feemed to take a patriotic pride in gra

ents choose to treat of the

female dress, tifying our curiosity. While I was by which I have been enabled, perfurveying the fortifications and the haps with tolerable certainty, to guess various scenes of action between the at the sex of the writers. By a few, French and the brave garrison, I re I am very tharply rebuked for almot peated to myself thofe- lines of Virgil, totally neglecting this department of

Juvat ire et Đorica caftra periodical lucubration, while others Defertosque videre locos, littusque re are humble enough to hope that I may lictum.

yet retrieve my character by a complete Hic Dolopum manus, hic fævus ten i reatile, or feries of papers on the fube debat Achilles;

ject. Claffibus hic locus ; hic acies certare Without divulging what my origin solebant.

pal intentions might be on this ima' On our return from Williamstadt we portant affair, 1 mult fay, that since orofled the Maele to Rotterdam by iny correlpondence relpecling Dress moon-light, and the effect produced began to increase, I was willing to try by the night scenery there was highly how far my correspondents would go kriking and pleasing.

We spent

of themselves; and whether it was the evening with an amiable English likely that their letters, when they family reliling here, by whofe holivia amounted 10 a heap, might not furnish talily we were amply recompensed for me with a complete series of arguthe frignes and privations of the day. ments pud and con, from which a body

We talk of leaving this place to ef laws could be extracted applicable morrow. You may expeét' to hear to every variety of fashion. But I have from me when we get to Utrecht. waited to no purpose; for my correį I am happy to infarin you that my spondents, having little concert among young friend and I agree very well 10 themfelves, are accustomed to send gether; his lemper and disposition ap me the fame hints, and the fame ada pear to be open and ingenuous,and Ieil vices, over and over again, from all tertain great hopes of his improvement. which I can only learn that fome He had laid a good foundation in the things wanı reformation, but nobody Latin language at W-, and he has knows how to fel about it. & relish for the beauties of fine writing.

I will allow that if Iain to be guided Early in the morning we devote fome by precedent only, no apology can be time to the Hisory of the Seven United fufficient for the apparent neglect witla Provinces, and when gliding in the which I have treated the important treckschuyte we have hitherto amuted subject of Dress ; for which of my preourselves with Pope's Imitations of deceffors would have reached his fixtyHorace, concerning which, if I am not fixth paper without having endeamisaken, it was observed by Lord voured to shorten a train, or to imChesterfield, that he thought Horace prore a trimming, to curl a ringlet, or was more obliged 10 Pope ihao Pope to to twift a fleeve? But it is this exHorace. Adieu; let me hear from cels of precedents which has frightyou frequeņıly, and believe me ened me from the undertaking. Where Yours ever.

so much hạs been said, what remains (To be continued.)

for me? Where no article has escaped

without an ample discussion, how can THE PROJECTOR, No LXVI. I hope for novelty; and what reason

“ If Beauty fail, have I to expect that my readers will Where are those ornaments, those pice be pieased with repetitions ? And, as attires

this subject has employed the pens of Which can reflect a luftre on that face, my predecessors for nearly a century, I Where me with light innate dildains to certainly did hope that in that time shine ?”

FERGUSON.

fome points might have been fettled, A MONG beimman have the besrand and recome remedior sapofe a proprietyever to receive from my correspondents, is a that in this I have been disappointed, very confiderable proportion which con- and that dress is one of those concerns Glts of hints which I am expected to im- which derive no benefit from expeprove and expand, concerning articles of rience. Dress. Į oblerye 100, that by far the Perhaps, however, my predecessors

may

[ocr errors]

may have been to blame, in not entering perhaps, we shall acquire more correct' so deeply into this subject as it delerves, notions on the fubject if we inquire and in confining theinfelves to the what dress was intended for And it' muffs, hoops, ribbons, or caps of is upon this important question, as their own times, without confidering just now hinted, that considerable light these in connexion with the cause of has lately been throwni. all dress, and of all varieties of drets. There used to be two opinions an They look upon dress anly in its con- this subject; the one, thai dress was nexion with the body; whereas it is intended for ornament, the other for well known that the connexion is warmth and decency. The first opimuch more intimate with the mind, nion, I think, must be given i, unand that the body is a mere passive lels they who hold it will content that agent appointed to exhibit the tym. it should blended with the other. The toms and signals of what is palling second opinion is what we are most within. I am not surprized, there concerned in, and what mutt now, ! fore, that men should have failed in thiuk, appear to be one of those antireforming matters of this kind, who quated opinions which we derive froin have viewed drels with the eyes of a our ancestors, but are not confiftent milliner rather than those of a philoso- with that liberality of mind and free pher, and have thown that they are dom of thinking which distinguish better qualified to triun a gown, than their posteriıy. Indeed, if we appeal to mend the wearer.

to facts only (and to what can we apo 1 I do not profess, in this paper, la peal with more certainty ?) this opinion enter upon the subject at full length; will appear to have very little foundabecause it would require, perhaps, the tion. . If dress were intended for : labour of a mau's life to reduce it to a 'warmth, would so many persons have fyltem, with the comfortable concla, thrown it almost entirely off on the fion that much of that labour might approach of a severe wimer? Would be thrown awayĮ shall only, there. they have been conient to perish in fore, in compliance with the wishes the extremes of front and fashion, if of my correlpondents, throw out a warmth had been any part of the use few hints in my deliłtory way, which of cloaths ? As lo decency, the opis may be hereafter improved by those nign of our ancesors may perhaps who have time and leisure.

have a better foundation ; but even Every science must be llydied by re- with respect to that, the fashionable curring to certain firkt principles, or world are by no meang agreed, and the general and acknowledged truths, from experiments of our milliners and man. which we may proceed to particular tuamakers on the subject, have alarmed and practical applications. liis, there fome very well-meaning people of the fore, with fome fatisfaction, that I old school. They have, I must con.. lately perceived an inclination to trace fefs, carried the stripping fysiem much backward what may be termed the farther than it ought to be carried first principles of dress. Indeed, we in this country, and must ere now cannot be supposed to argue well upon have been the destruction of their own any subject without correct definitions, trade, if they had not made a final! and wjhout tracing the subject as far reserve of dress which they claim the back as possible, and endeavouring 1o privilege of new-modelling at pleasure. profit by thofe who have gone before It has been a quefiion with lome reus. In like manner, we shall certainly decling persons, to what all this tendunderstand one other better upon the ed ? and numerouş invectives, in all subject of dress, if we are able to agree Mapes, essays, painphlets, and caricaas io what dress is, and what it was ture-prins, have been employed to rig intended for

dicule the fashion. For my pari, i Now, on these two questions, or, chole to contemplate the whole as ihe at least, on the second, a very couli- result of an experiment tried in con, derable light was lately attempted to juvelion with our Parifiąn neighbours, be thrown. Dr. Johnson gives no in order to solve the question on the other definition of dress, than by these utility of dress, in the first instance, three words, cloaths, garment, 'habil; and ihen to determine the smallest which are by no means fasisfactory, quantity of dress necessary for a belle of because they tell us merely that dress the firni fashion. That @conomy en. is cloaths, and cloaths is drets. But tered at all into confideration, muft, I

think,

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »