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proach. He rode among the enemy's ranks, and bore down all before him. Say, goddess, whom he few first, and whom he flew last. First, Gondibert + ad, vanced against him, clad in heavy armour, and mounted on a staid sober gelding, not so famed for his: speed, as his docility in kneeling, whenever his rider would mount or alight. He had made a vow to Pallas, that he would never leave the field, till he bad {poiled Homer of his armour I; madman! who had never once Jeen the wearer, nor understood his strength. Him Homer. overthrew, horse and man, to the ground; there to be trampled and choked in the dirt. Then, with a long spear, he flew Denham, a stout modern; who, from his father's fide, derived his lineage from: Apollo, but his mother was of mortal race it. He fell, and bit the earth. The celestial part Apollo took, and made it a star; but the terrestrial lay wallowing upon the ground. Then Homer New Wesley şi with a kick of his horse's heel. He took Perrault by mighty force out of his saddle, then hurled him at Fontenelle, with the same blow dalhing out both their brains.

On the left wing of the horse, Virgil appeared in fhining armour, compleatly fitted to his body.

He was mounted on a dapple grey steed; the flownefs of whose pace was an effect of the highest mettle and vigour. He cast his eye on the adverse wing, with a desire to find an object worthy of his valour ; when, behold, upon a forrel gelding of a monstrous fize, appeared a foe issuing from among the thickest of the enemy's squadrons.: but his fpeed was less than his noise ; for his horse, old and lean, spent the dregs of his strength in a high trot; which, tho' it made sow advances, yet caused a loud clashing of his armour, terrible to hear. The two cavaliers had now approached within a throw of a lance; when the

stranger

P. 3

+ An heroic poem by Sir: William Davenant, in stanza's of four lines.

Vid. Homer. || Sir John Denham's poers are very unequal, extremely good, and very indifferent; so that his detractors said, he was not the seal author of Cooper's Hill.

f Mr. Wefley, who wrote the Life of Chrift in verse, bo.

The destined hour of fate bei dem and hands, and pens, by

Sota mouse under a canopy of state, borovic beau from within the pent-house of a ek and remote. Dryden, in a long harangue,

e good antient, called him father ; and, by rukty between them, Virgil consented (for the goddess thöhis was of gold, and cost a hundred beeves t, the mour became the modern yet worse than his own.

other's but of rufty iron. However, this glittering ar

the vanilhed in a mift ; and the hero pero

zard of his goddess his mother.

d; which, af

e renowned Drybegan; whereof, before I dar

carted, as one pofparticular description, I muft

intment together : for authors, petition for a b

iarge

for the head; which winder

part, even like the Laperform fo fideft over history. field of battle.

and the voice was fuited to the visage, observing G with a mi b:

genealogies, made it plainly appear, upon the for

nearly related. Then he humbly propounfeen, and caft a mitt before his eyes)

Then they agreed to exchange horses ; but, when it came to the trial, Dryden' was afraid, and utterly unable to

war they were

Dripidence

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mount.

Alter hiatus in MS.

Lucan appeared upon a fiery horfe, of admirable shape, bat head-Atrong, bearing the rider where he list, over the field. He made a mighty flaughter among the enemy's hørfe ; which destruction to stop, Blckmaré, a famous modern, (but one of the mercenaries) ftrenuously opposed himfelf ; and darted a javelin, with a strong hand, which, falling short of its mark, ftruck deep in the earth. Then Lucan threw a lance; but Æsculapius came unseen, and turned off the point. " | Brave modern (said Lacan) I perceive “ fome god protects you ;. for never did my arm fo de“ ceive me before. But what mortał can contend with a god! Therefore let us fight no longer, but prefent

" gifts * Vid. Homer. # His kill as a physician attoned for bis dulness as a poet.

Tts to each other.” Lucan then bestowed the modern

of spurs, and Bl-ckm-re gave Lucan a bridle.

BATTLE OF THE BOOKS,

enemr's razki, and

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at the goddefs Dulness took a cloud, formed

Thape of Horace, armed and mounted, and ed it in a flying posture before him. Glad was the cavalier te begin a combat with a flying foe, and pursued the image, threatening loud ; till at lait iz led him to the peaceful bower of his father Ogilby; by whom he was difarmed, and aligned to his repofe.

Then Pindar flew and and Oldham, and -, and Afra f the Amazon, light of foot ; never advancing in a direct line, but wheeling with incredible agility and force, he made a terrible slaughter among the enemy's ligbt-horse. Him when Cowley observed, his generous heart burnt within him, and he advanced against the fierce antient, imitating his address, and pace, and career, as well as the vigour of his horse, and his own skill, would allow. When the two cavaliers had approached within the length of three javelins, first Cowley threw a lance; which missed Pindar, and pafing into the enemy's ranks, fell ineffectual to the ground. Then Pindar darted a javelin, so large and weighty, that scarce a dozen cavalieri, as cavaliers are in our degenerate days, could raise it from the ground; yet be threw it with ease, and it went by an unerring hand finging thro' the air ; nor could the modern have avoided present death, if he had not luckily oppofed the field that had been given. him by Venus it. And now both heroes drew their fwords. But the modern was fo aghaft and disordered, that he knew not where he was ; his fhield dropt from his hands ; thrice he fied, and thrice he could not escape. At last he turned, and, lifting up his hands in the posture of a fuppliant, * Godlike Pindar (faid he) spare my “ life, and possess my horse with thefe arms, besides the

56 ransom

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Mrs. Afra Behn, author of many plays, novels, and poems.
His poem called the Miffrejs.

ftranger desired a parley, and lifting up the vizard of his helmet, a face hardly appeared from within ; which, after a pause, was known for that of the renowned Dryden. 'The brave antient suddenly ftarted, as one poffeffed with furprise and disappointment together : for the helmet was nine times too large for the head; which appeared fituate far in the hinder part, even like the Lady in a lobster, or like a mouse under a canopy of state, or like a shrivelled beau from within the pent-house of a modern periwig: and the voice was fuited to the visage, founding weak and remote. Dryden, in a long harangue, foothed up the good antient, called him father; and, by a large deduction of genealogies, made it plainly appear, that they were nearly related. Then he humbly propofed an exchange of armour, as a lasting mark of hospitality between them, Virgil consented (for the goddess Difidence came unseen, and cast a mitt before his eyes) tho' his was of gold, and cost a hundred beeves t, the other's but of rufty iron. However, this glittering armour became the modern yet worse than his own. Then they agreed to exchange horfes ; but, when it came to the trial, Dryden was afraid, and utterly unable to mount.

Alter hiatus in MS.

Lucan appeared upon a fiery horse, of admirable shape, but head-Arong, bearing the rider where he list, over the field. He made a mighty flaughter among the enemy's horse ; which destruction to stop, Blackmore, a famous modern, (but one of the mercenaries) ftrenuoully opposed hiinfelf ; and darted a javelin, with a strong hand, which, falling short of its mark, ftruck deep in the earth. Then Lucan threw a lance; but Æsculapius came unseen, and turned off the point. “ I Brave modern (faid Lacan) I perceive “ fome god protects you ; for never did my arm fo de“ ceive me before. But what mortal can contend with a god? Therefore let us fight no longer, but prefent

gifts Vid. Homer. # His kill as a phyfcian attoned for bis dulness as a poeta

“ gifts to each other.” Lucan then bestowed the modern a pair of jpurs, and Bl-ckm-re gave Lucan a bridle.

*

Pauca defunt. Creech : but the goddess Dulness took a cloud, formed into the shape of Horace, armed and mounted, and placed it in a flying posture before him. Glad was the cavalier to begin a combat with a flying foe, and pursued. the image, threatening loud ; till at lait ir led him to the peaceful bower of his father Ogilby; by whom he was difarmed, and affigned to his repofe. THEN Pindar flew, and and Oldham, and

and Afra † the Amazon, light of foot; never advancing in a direct line, but wheeling with incredible agility and force, he made a terrible slaughter among the enemy's light-horse. Him when Cowley observed, his. generous heart burnt within him, and he advanced a. gainst the fierce antient, imitating his address, and pace, and career, as well as the vigour of his horse, and his own skill, would allow. When the two cavaliers had approached within the length of three javelins, first Cow. ley threw a lance; which missed Pindar, and palling into the enemy's ranks, fell ineffectual to the ground. Then Pindar darted a javelin, so large and weighty, that scarce a dozen cavalieri, as cavaliers are in our degenerate days, could raise it from the ground; yet he threw it with ease, and it went by an unerring hand finging thro' the air nor could the modern have avoided present death, if he had not luckily oppofed the shield that had been given him by Venus il. And now. both heroes drew their fwords. But the modern was fo aghaft and disordered, that he knew not where he was; his Thield dropt from his hands ; thrice he fied, and thrice he could not escape. At last he turned, and, lifting up his hands in the posture of a fuppliant, Godlike Pindar (faid he) spare my life, and possess my horse with thefe arms, besides the

so ransom

Mrs. Afra Behn, author of many plays, novels, and poems.
His poem called the Mistress.

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