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INDEX.

A.

PAGE

PAGE Corinna's Last Song.

716

Creole.

434

Abbot.

687

838

Cowper. By Henry T. Tuckerman.

Address. By A. B. Longstreet.

651

Culture of the Fine Arts. By J. K. Fisher.

842

Ambition.

284

An Infant's Spirit.

D.

Anburey's Travels in America. By C. Campbell. 710 Darkness.

305
Ancient Eloquence. By W. G. Howard.
703 Death Dreams of the Young Napoleon.

822
Arabella.
766 | Death is Wisdom.

106

Arabella Stuart.

717 Departed.

366

Arabian Literature, No. I.

457 Desultory Speculator, No. VI.

333

No. II.

563

No. VII.

514

No. III.

760

No. VIII.

700

Atoms.
575 Desultory Thoughts. By T. H. Shreeve.

608
Autobiography of an Irritable Man.

522 Death has Claimed his Fair Victim. By C.W. Everest 828
Autumn. By Charles Lanman.
723 Dialogue.

72

Autumn Reverie. By Mrs. E. J. Eames.

820 Diary of a Ruralizer.

367

B.
Dirge of the Mariner. By H. T. Tuckerman.

785

222
Bathos of Music.

Duellist.
563

665
Beauty of Bantam.

Dying Exile.

581
Beauty and Religion

601
Dying Poet.

469

Be True to Thyself. By R. W. Griswold.

713

E.

Biography of Col. C. M. Thruston,

163 Eagle on Mount Holyoke.

55

Bobolink.

521 Eagle and Swan. By Mrs. L. J. Pierson,

686

Bulwer.

405 Early Lays. By W. G. Simms. 36-290-444-836

Butterfly, Fly-Trap and Bard.
203 Edmund Spenser.

567
By the Rivers of Babylon. By G. B. Wallis. 706 Effects of Unbelief. By Mrs. E. J. Eames.

546

C.

Ellen Dale.

385

34

Canova. By M. Morgan, U. S. N.,-No. I.

Empire Star.

115

Emigrant Ship.

465

No. II.

329

Enamoured Flower.

736

Case of Camoens. By Mrs. Henrietta Shuck 822

326-328-416-469
Channing and the Edinburgh Review..

Epigram.

2

374

Change and Decay. By W, G. Howard.

Epistola Scotiana.

825

Characteristics of Lamb. By H. T, Tuckerman.

Essay on the Influence of Christianity on the Crimi-

652

nal Law of England.

129

Change of the Violet. By Miss A. M. F. Buchanan. 640

Ethan Allen,

460

Character of Queen Elizabeth.

53

720

Chippewa Widow,

Evening Walk in the City. By Charles Lanman.

450

402

Charles Tyrrel. By James.

Excerpts from Clarendon.

300

Christmas Ode.

Excerpts, &c.

514-519-549-572-574

2

Coffin.

129

F.

Commodore Nicolson.

470 Fables, Translated from Lessing.

530

Conscript's Grave.
368 Faded Stars.

49

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Fading of a Rose.

299 Literary Recreations. By Anagram Ferrun. No. I.

Fallen.

114

No. II.

Falls of the Saco.

88

No. III

Female Education.

451 Literary and Intellectual Distinction.

First Day of May.

385 Lord Byron.

First Tear.

829 Love and Care.

Flowers.

579 Lover's Drink Song.

Formation of Opinions.

699ud
Fragments of Verse.

736
From the French.

Mahomet's Paradise.
281

Milhatchee, The Enchanted Warrior.

G.

Memoir of M. Andryane.

Georgia Scenes and Sketches,

572 Message by the Winds.

German's Daughter.

737 Michal, Saul's Daughter.

Gertrude Hoffman.

417 Michigan. By Charles Lanman.

Girlhood.

296 Midnight Storm.

Gleanings from Early New England History,

46 Midsummer Fancies. By Geo. D. Strong.

Goldsmith. By H. T. Tuckerman.

267 Midnight Serenade.

Military Glory.

H.

Mirth and Sadness.

Hagar.

303 Moral and Mental Portraits.

Harriet Livermore.

675 Moral Influence of Authors. •

Historic Speculations. By C. of Richmond, Va. 606 Motherless Daughters. No. I.

History of an Adventurer. Part I. -

135

No. II.

Part II.

249

No. III.

Part III.

341 Mountain Top.

Home. By Luzerne Ray.

829 Mountains of Virginia.

Homines Apud Infernos.

55 Mr. Lindsay's Manuscript.

Hon. C. A. Murray-Letter.

571 Mrs. Shooter's Party.

Hope.

818 Murray's Travels.

Human Glory.

554 Music.

My Cousin Mary Bell.

I.

Mysteries of the Bible. By W. G. Howard,

Ianthe.

545 My Uncle's Unpublished Manuscripts. No. I.

I'll Think of Thee, Love.

135

No. II.

Imri. Part I.

12

No. III.

Part II.

326

No. IV.

Part III.

402

No. V.

Incident of the War of 1812-’14.

38

No. VI.

Inseriority of American Literature.

707

N.

Intercepted Correspondence. By A. D. G. No. I. 411

No. II. 600

Nameless Essay. By Charles Lanman.

No. III. 811 New Poem, in the Scottish Tongue.
Irving's Life of Columbus.

569 Night of the Coronation.

Isabel.

468

North-American Indians.

Northern Rambles.

677

Island and its Associations. By Edward Parmele.

I Would Not Live Alway.

85

Notices of New Works.

Nun's Work.

J.

0.

Jefferson.

6-12

Ode to Spring
Jerusalem.

387

Oh! Give Me Thy Heart.

Judgment.

581

Ohio.

L.

Oh! Life Has Nought.

Late Theodore Sedgwick.

On the Approach of Winter.
52

On the Death of Christ.
Leaf From Indian Island.

815
Learned Blacksmith.

201

Our Country's Flag. By J. W. Mathews.

Qur Navy. No. I.

Letter Congratulatory.

457

No. II.

Letter from an Indian Chief.

40

169

61

72

332

222

624

123

224
274
378
397
555

.

377
397

24

337

25

46
699
233
305
785

No. III.

Letters to My Sister. No. I.

407

No. II.

485

P.

No. III.

550 Past.

No. IV.

763 Pastor.

Lines.

456-514-567 Patriot's Chosen Sepulchre.

Lines. By Mrs. Mary E. Hewitt.

820 Percy Bysshe Shelley. By Mrs. Seba Smith.

Lines on the Death of Capt. M. M. Dox.

181 Pictures by the Sun.
Lines on an Eagle Soaring among the Mountains. 601 Pines.
Lines on the Sudden Death of a Very Dear Friend. 675 Poetical Specimens.
Lines to a Sister.

468 Poetic Musings. By R. H. Gould.

Listus Albidus.

491 Poetical Trifles.

842

181

245

717

193

192

641

595

200

520 Tasso.

Q.

PAGE

PAGE

Pool of Bethesda,

60 | Story of Caliph Stork.

207

Pope. By H. T. Tuckerran.
713 Summer Morning. By Charles Lanman.

609

Poet and the Sibil.

240 Summer-Day Dreams in the Country.

211

Power is Knowledge.

835 | Sunset Storm in Summer.

274

Paxer of Death.

51

Present and the Future.

68

T.

Prisoner on Parole. Part I.

245

Talk with the Winds.

281

Part II.

337

Tale of the Revolution.

681

Professional Indolence,

468
Prophetic Tapestry.
666 The Way He Won Her.

770
Thus would I Die.

233

Thoughts.

722

Qaakeress. No. I.

491 Thoughts and Reflections. No. I.

213

No. II.

660

No. II.

282

No. III.

830 Thoughts and Reflections.

280-464-503

Thoughts on Literature.

296

To

24-434-488

Rambling Sketches. By A Rustic. No. I.

384

To Antoinette.

838

No. II.

586 To My Brother in Town.

40

Readings.

819

To the Rose Geranium.

Reflections of a Reformed Drunkard.

325 To A Lady

61

Renains of Napoleon. By L. J. Cist.
680 To My Brother.

223

i Reminiscences of the British.

85 To * * *. By J. C. M'Cabe.

598

1 reply to some Remarks on Shelley.
826 To My Mother.

611

etorn.

364 To A Poetess. By T. H. Shreeve.

641

hapsodia Senecis.

724 To the Constellation Lyra. By Wm. Wallace. 676
Rights of Authors.
69 To Her of the Hazel-Eye. By L. J. Cist.

702
Roan Gelding.
292 To the Ocean.

248
To the Moon. By Egeria of Ohio.

622

S.

To Anna.

279

Sabbath in the Country.

576

To a Lady Convalescent.

328

Sabbath Recollections.

393

To My Wife.

383

San Marino. By H, T. Tuckerman.

To Mary.
41

387

Self Cultiration.

461

To a Beech Tree.

485

Sell Knowledge. By T. H. S.

To a Lark.

686

550

Serenade.

To Mrs. S. P. Q., on her Marriage.

248--569

578

Shadows.

Three Deaf Men.

463

224

Slavery and the Constitution.

89

Translation from Tyrtæus.

410

Shelley. By H. T. Tuckerman.

393
To a Withered Rose.

816
Short Chapters. By Patrick Pedant. No. I.

240

U.

No. II.

369

Should-Be State of Niagara. By W. B. Fairchild. 731 United States Navy.

489

Sinnabab. By William Falconer.

803 Usages, Customs, and Superstitions of the Inhabitants

Skeptie. By P. K. Kilbourn.

650

of the Black Mountain.

726

Skenando.

770
Sketches of Georgia.

775
Smithsonian Institute.

25
Smiles and Tears.

Versification of the Eighth Psalm.
433

341
Smatterers. By T. H. S.

Village Blacksmith. By H. W. Longfellow.

819
660

585
Songs of the Passions,

Virginia Dare. By Miss C. L. Tuthill.
Sonnets. By Park Benjamin.

Visit to Stratford Hall.

800
473
Sondets from the French of Scarron.

Vive La Bagatelle.
223

414
Sonnets.
68--207-229-284-470–769
Voice of Music. By Mrs. Mary E. Hewitt.

628

Voice of the Lord.

732

Songs.

53--213-414-416-568

Sonnet-Childhood.

737

Song of the Vine.

769

Song By a Gentleman of Richmond.
710 Wanderer's Mementos.

329
Song. By a Lady of Ohio.

585 Wants of Society, the True Patrons of Enterprise. 465
Song By a young Lady of 14, of Kentucky. 641 Waste of Intellect.

376

Song of New England.

763 / Where Art Thou.

785

“ Souvenirs de June Age."

219 White and Black Slavery.

193

South-West.

219 William O'Wisp.

211

Spanish Romance.

14 Winter.

60

Sparks That May Kindle, No. I.

204 Withered Leaves. By Miss Jane T. Lomax.

828

No. II.

813 Wortbies of Virginia. By Mrs. Seba Smith.

49

Spring.

267 Wreck of the Hesperus.

114

Stage.

846

Stanzas.

Y.

467

Stanzas. Written in Moments of Despondency. 416 Yellow Blossom of Glynn.

505

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EDITOR'S TABLE.

PAGE

304 304 779 780 781

229 777 780

231

304

PAGE
A.

M.
Address, delivered before the Philodemic Society of Marian. By Mrs. Hall.
Georgetown, D. C.

232 McDuffie's Eulogy on Hayne.

Minor's Address.
C.

Macauley's Miscellanies.
Chevalier's Letters.

781 | Menzel's German Literature. Classical Studies.

582

P. Charlottesville Advocate.

232 Chapin's Lectures-with Extracts.

304–388 Pathfinder. Chapin's Oration.

582 Pierpont's Poetical Works. D.

Pocahontas. Dramas, Discourses and other pieces.

R. Deferred Notices.

232

Rejected Addresses.
E.

S.
Editor's Address.

1

Sam Slick's Letter-Bag of the Great Western. Emily; or, Mistakes in Religion.

232

Specimens in Literature. Extracts. Excerpts.

762—777

Shelley's Essays, &c.
F.

Supplement.
Franklin's Life and Writings.

231

T. Force's Historical Tracts.

574

The Fruit of the Spirit.
I.

Triumph of Peace. Extracts.
Irving's Works; Extract.

471 | Token-1841.

Two Years Before the Mast.
L.

V.
Lieber's Legal and Political Hermeneutics.

304 Lieber's Political Ethics.

304 Voices of the Night and other Poems.

232 391 470 782

232 392 781 781

230

SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER.

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BY WILLIAM WALLACE.

to utter.

THE DYING EAGLE. more clearly than he. But in the somewhat pecu

liar plan of his work, and in the measures he meant

to adopt for its support, he discerned probabilities of Bird of the Storm!—why liest thou here

success which had not belonged to his precursors. With closing eye and drooping plume?

He made the venture-took his course—and has
Is it the coward pang of fear
Which chains thee to this earthly tomb?

pursued it, until this commencement of a sixth year; No: the red lightnings, in thy sphere

so that the MESSENGER may now be considered as Of tempest-midnight-cloud and gloom, established. He has no expressions of triumph now Scorched these bold wings, that dared to soar

The good, which his labors may have Where thunders burst before.

done—the varied talent, to which they may have Lord of the Air !-thy mighty heart

given scope and exercise—the virtuous principles No longer revels in that pride

they may have cherished—the soothing they may Which made the dark-plumed monarch dart

have administered to political or to sectional animoWhere whirlwinds rage and dash aside

sity—the scourgings they have caused to folly and The mountain-mist, that man's poor art Ever in vain attempts to stride.

vice-together with the praises they have wonOur eyes no more shall mark thy form,

shall not now form any part of his theme. There The rider of the storm.

are other topics, to which he anxiously invokes So sinks the glorions bird !-and so

public attention. The high of spirit ever fall!-

By failures of subscribers to pay what they owe They soar above-the envious blow

him, he has lost not less than three thousand dollars. Like thee, poor Eagle, strikes them all!

By the necessity to which mainly their tardiness Rest, warrior-bird ! Autumn will throt

has subjected him, of employing collectors at a Her dead leaves o'er thee--and thy pall,

ruinous commission of 12, 15, and 17 per cent., he Like mine as I would wish, shall be Of Nature's Ministry.

Louisville.

has lost some thousands more.

By the difference of exchange, alone, he has lost

at least two thousand more. And, since much of this THE NEW YEAR.

loss was upon arrears, which should have been paid

before these disastrous times came on,--so much, of When, nearly six years ago, the plan of this Maga- this also, is chargeable to the tardiness of subscribers. zine was formed, how few of its friends believed that He has not-he never had-any large property, it would live to this day! How surely did they or pecuniary resources except in his own skill as a presage not only a speedy death to the work, but printer; and he is of a delicate frame. Thus ruin to its undertaker!

situated, he may perhaps justifiably allude to his In truth, it seemed a rash and perilous enterprize. own energy and good management in having acThe editor's ALL, of fortune and of credit, was em-complished what he has done—not for the purbarked. Nay more-he devoted himself, in the ad- pose of self-glorification, but in order to ask, if he venture, to toils and cares, which by their minute - does not merit a better return, than the loss of so ness and complexity, their weight and unceasingness, many thousands ? threatened, as they have proved to be, worrying and The Messenger, indeed, is established: and the exhausting beyond all proportion to his humble lot new and costly dress of the present number evinand lowly pretensions.-All Southern experience, ces the editor's confidence, that he can sustain it. too, warned him of the hazard he was running. No But if he can, it will be solely through the literary periodical on our side of Mason's and Dix-success of this appeal. It will be, because former on's line, had been able to survive a sickly infancy, subscribers will make their patronage real and benesickly, in respect of pecuniary aliment, but not always ficial to him-instead of a mockery and a detriment. so, intellectually. A Review had existed for two or It will be, because new ones, attracted by the imthree years in South-Carolina, teeming with articles provements visible from time to time in both the of a power no where surpassed; or surpassed only garb and contents of liis Magazine,-animated by by the best of the Edinburg Review. Notwithstand- a wish to aid the sole effort that has given tokens ing its merits, the Southern Review ; alike with the of permanent success, in the cause of Southern various host of kindred attempts, had sunk into a pre- Literature,-and resolved to make their help solid mature grave. With such evidences of an ungenial and well-timed, not illusory and destructive,-will climate before his eyes, how could the Editor of come forward to the rescue. But for his confidence the Messenger hope to escape the universal doom? that all this will be, he could not apply the word

No one saw these discouraging circumstances'established,' to his work. He may be vainly and

1

VOL. VI.-1

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