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" May we know what this new doctrine, whereof thou speakest, is? 20 For thou bringest certain strange things to our ears : we would know therefore what these things mean. 21 (For all the Athenians, and strangers which were there, spent their time in nothing... "
The Yale Literary Magazine - Page 173
1854
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Good Thoughts in Bad Times, Good Thoughts in Worse Times, Mixt ...

Thomas Fuller, William Pickering - 1841 - 358 pages
...will more admire that any was ever destroyed. XVIII. ALL TONGUE AND EARS. WE read, Acts, xvii. 21, All the Athenians, and strangers which were there,...in nothing else but either to tell or to hear some new thing. How cometh this transposition ? tell and hear ; it should be hear and tell ; they must hear...
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A Winter in the Azores: And a Summer at the Baths of the Furnas, Volume 1

Joseph Bullar, Henry Bullar - 1841
...or gods, the quiet Azoreans may be said to resemble the Athenians, of whom it is told, that " they spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing." The gardens in Fayal, so far as we saw them, though laid out in a formal French style,...
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Principles of Eloquence

John Siffrein Maury - 1842
...deep moral culture, that profound sense of the infinite and invisible, that consciousness of " For all the Athenians and strangers which were there spent...in nothing else but either to tell or to hear some new thing." Acts, xvii., 21. The whole passage, from the 16th verse to the close of the chapter,...
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Plain Sermons, Volume 4

1842
...Athenians needed this less than others, because, as St. Luke here tells us, the whole city, " and the strangers which were there, spent their time in nothing else, but either to see or hear some new thing." Curiosity, a passion for news, took up their minds more than any thing....
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The Bible Reader: Being a New Selection of Reading Lessons from the Holy ...

William Bentley Fowle - 1843 - 283 pages
...thou bringest certain strange things to our ears; we would know therefore what these things mean. (For all the Athenians and strangers which were there,...nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing.) Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious. For as I passed...
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Back to Virtue: Traditional Moral Wisdom for Modern Moral Confusion

Peter Kreeft - 1992 - 195 pages
...explain to his non-Greek audience this strange Greek behavior: "All the Athenians and the foreigners who were there spent their time in nothing else but either to tell or to hear some new thing" (17:21). The most important word in their language was logos, which meant (among other things)...
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The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations

Robert Andrews - 1993 - 1092 pages
...as Artist." pi. 2 (published in Intentions, 1891). Set- also Byron on HUMANKIND: KINDNESS. GOSSIP 1 way out of the difficulty? It but fastens and perpetuates...trouble which occasioned it. and increases the tota new thing. BIBLE: NEW TESTAMENT. St. Paul in Ads 17:21. 2 Not only idle, but tattlers also and busybodies,...
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Is America Committing Suicide?

Austin L. Sorenson - 1994 - 250 pages
...philosopher's paradise. Their craze then (as now) was for something new ["(For all the Athenians . . . spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing)" (Acts 17:21).] Said one, "The period between the birth of Pericles and the death of Aristotle...
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Acts 14-28: Torrance Edition

John Calvin - 1996 - 336 pages
...we would know therefore what these things mean. (Now all the Athenians and the strangers sojourning there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing.) (16-21) 16. His spirit was burning. Although, wherever he went, Paul strenuously carried...
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Polite Wisdom: Heathen Rhetoric in Milton's Areopagitica

Paul M. Dowling - 1995 - 113 pages
...Areopagus, Paul preached Christianity before Epicurean and Stoic philosophers, who (as Scripture says) "spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing." 4 But when the philosophers heard of Christ's resurrection from the dead, they mocked the...
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